ENGLISH

The fisherman and his wife

日本語

漁師とおかみ


There was once a fisherman and his wife who lived together in a hovel by the sea-shore, and the fisherman went out every day with his hook and line to catch fish, and he angled and angled.

One day he was sitting with his rod and looking into the clear water, and he sat and sat.

At last down went the line to the bottom of the water, and when he drew it up he found a great flounder on the hook. And the flounder said to him, "Fisherman, listen to me; let me go, I am not a real fish but an enchanted prince. What good shall I be to you if you land me? I shall not taste well; so put me back into the water again, and let me swim away."

"Well," said the fisherman, "no need of so many words about the matter, as you can speak I had much rather let you swim away."
Then he put him back into the clear water, and the flounder sank to the bottom, leaving a long streak of blood behind him. Then the fisherman got up and went home to his wife in their hovel.
"Well, husband," said the wife, "have you caught nothing to-day?"
"No," said the man "that is, I did catch a flounder, but as he said he was an enchanted prince, I let him go again."
"Then, did you wish for nothing?"said the wife.
"No," said the man; "what should I wish for?"
"Oh dear!" said the wife; "and it is so dreadful always to live in this evil-smelling hovel j you might as well have wished for a little cottage; go again and call him; tell him we want a little cottage, I daresay he will give it us; go, and be quick."
And when he went back, the sea was green and yellow, and not nearly so clear. So he stood and said,
"O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
Then the flounder came swimming up, and said,
"Now then, what does she want?"
"Oh," said the man, "you know when I caught you my wife says I ought to have wished for something. She does not want to live any longer in the hovel, and would rather have a cottage.
"Go home with you," said the flounder, "she has it already."
So the man went home, and found, instead of the hovel, a little cottage, and his wife was sitting on a bench before the door. And she took him by the hand, and said to him,
"Come in and see if this is not a great improvement."
So they went in, and there was a little house-place and a beautiful little bedroom, a kitchen and larder, with all sorts of furniture, and iron and brass ware of the very best. And at the back was a little yard with fowls and ducks, and a little garden full of green vegetables and fruit.
"Look," said the wife, "is not that nice?"
"Yes," said the man, "if this can only last we shall be very well contented."
"We will see about that," said the wife. And after a meal they went to bed.
So all went well for a week or fortnight, when the wife said,
"Look here, husband, the cottage is really too confined, and the yard and garden are so small; I think the flounder had better get us a larger house; I should like very much to live in a large stone castle; so go to your fish and he will send us a castle."
"0 my dear wife," said the man, "the cottage is good enough; what do we want a castle for?"
"We want one," said the wife; "go along with you; the flounder can give us one."
"Now, wife," said the man, "the flounder gave us the cottage; I do not like to go to him again, he may be angry."
"Go along," said the wife, "he might just as well give us it as not; do as I say!"
The man felt very reluctant and unwilling; and he said to himself,
"It is not the right thing to do;" nevertheless he went.
So when he came to the seaside, the water was purple and dark blue and grey and thick, and not green and yellow as before. And he stood and said,
"O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
"Now then, what does she want?"said the flounder.
"Oh," said the man, half frightened, "she wants to live in a large stone castle."
"Go home with you, she is already standing before the door," said the flounder.
Then the man went home, as he supposed, but when he got there, there stood in the place of the cottage a great castle of stone, and his wife was standing on the steps, about to go in; so she took him by the hand, and said,
"Let us enter."
With that he went in with her, and in the castle was a great hall with a marble- pavement, and there were a great many servants, who led them through large doors, and the passages were decked with tapestry, and the rooms with golden chairs and tables, and crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling; and all the rooms had carpets. And the tables were covered with eatables and the best wine for any one who wanted them. And at the back of the house was a great stable-yard for horses and cattle, and carriages of the finest; besides, there was a splendid large garden, with the most beautiful flowers and fine fruit trees, and a pleasance full half a mile long, with deer and oxen and sheep, and everything that heart could wish for.
"There! "said the wife, "is not this beautiful?"
"Oh yes," said the man, "if it will only last we can live in this fine castle and be very well contented."
"We will see about that," said the wife, "in the meanwhile we will sleep upon it." With that they went to bed.
The next morning the wife was awake first, just at the break of day, and she looked out and saw from her bed the beautiful country lying all round. The man took no notice of it, so she poked him in the side with her elbow, and said,
"Husband, get up and just look out of the window. Look, just think if we could be king over all this country . Just go to your fish and tell him we should like to be king."
"Now, wife," said the man, "what should we be kings for? I don't want to be king."
"Well," said the wife, "if you don't want to be king, I will be king."
"Now, wife," said the man, "what do you want to be king for? I could not ask him such a thing."
"Why not?" said the wife, "you must go directly all the same; I must be king."
So the man went, very much put out that his wife should want to be king.
"It is not the right thing to do-not at all the right thing," thought the man. He did not at all want to go, and yet he went all the same.
And when he came to the sea the water was quite dark grey, and rushed far inland, and had an ill smell. And he stood and said,
'' O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
"Now then, what does she want?" said the fish. "Oh dear!"said the man, "she wants to be king."
"Go home with you, she is so already," said the fish.
So the man went back, and as he came to the palace he saw it was very much larger, and had great towers and splendid gateways; the herald stood before the door, and a number of soldiers with kettle-drums and trumpets.
And when he came inside everything was of marble and gold, and there were many curtains with great golden tassels. Then he went through the doors of the saloon to where the great throne-room was, and there was his wife sitting upon a throne of gold and diamonds, and she had a great golden crown on, and the sceptre in her hand was of pure gold and jewels, and on each side stood six pages in a row, each one a head shorter than the other. So the man went up to her and said,
"Well, wife, so now you are king!"
"Yes," said the wife, "now I am king."
So then he stood and looked at her, and when he had gazed at her for some time he said,
"Well, wife, this is fine for you to be king! now there is nothing more to wish for."
"O husband!" said the wife, seeming quite restless, "I am tired of this already. Go to your fish and tell him that now I am king I must be emperor."
"Now, wife," said the man, "what do you want to be emperor for?"
"Husband," said she, "go and tell the fish I want to be emperor.!'
"Oh dear!" said the man, "he could not do it-I cannot ask him such a thing. There is but one emperor at a time; the fish can't possibly make any one emperor-indeed he can't."
"Now, look here," said the wife, "I am king, and you are only my husband, so will you go at once? Go along! for if he was able to make me king he is able to make me emperor; and I will and must be emperor, so go along!"
So he was obliged to go; and as he went he felt very uncomfortable about it, and he thought to himself,
"It is not at all the right thing to do; to want to be emperor is really going too far; the flounder will soon be beginning to get tired of this."
With that he came to the sea, and the water was quite black and thick, and the foam flew, and the wind blew, and the man was terrified. But he stood and said,
"O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
"What is it now?" said the fish.
"Oh dear! "said the man, "my wife wants to be emperor."
"Go home with you," said the fish, "she is emperor already."
So the man went home, and found the castle adorned with polished marble and alabaster figures, and golden gates. The troops were being marshalled before the door, and they were blowing trumpets and beating drums and cymbals; and when he entered he saw barons and earls and dukes waiting about like servants; and the doors were of bright gold. And he saw his wife sitting upon a throne made of one entire piece of gold, and it was about two miles high; and she had a great golden crown on, which was about three yards high, set with brilliants and carbuncles; and in one hand she held the sceptre, and in the other the globe; and on both sides of her stood pages in two rows, all arranged according to their size, from the most enormous giant of two miles high to the tiniest dwarf of the size of my little finger; and before her stood earls and dukes in crowds. So the man went up to her and said,
"Well, wife, so now you are emperor."
"Yes," said she, "now I am emperor."
Then he went and sat down and had a good look at her, and then he said,
"Well now, wife, there is nothing left to be, now you are emperor."
"What are you talking about, husband?" said she; "I am emperor, and next I will be pope! so go and tell the fish so."
"Oh dear!" said the man, "what is it that you don't want? You can never become pope; there is but one pope in Christendom, and the fish can't possibly do it."
"Husband," said she, "no more words about it; I must and will be pope; so go along to the fish."
"Now, wife," said the man, "how can I ask him such a thing? it is too bad-it is asking a little too much; and, besides, he could not do it."
"What rubbish!" said the wife; '' if he could make me emperor he can make me pope. Go along and ask him; I am emperor, and you are only my husband, so go you must."
So he went, feeling very frightened, and he shivered and shook, and his knees trembled; and there arose a great wind, and the clouds flew by, and it grew very dark, and the sea rose mountains high, and the ships were tossed about, and the sky was partly blue in the middle, but at the sides very dark and red, as in a great tempest. And he felt very desponding, and stood trembling and said,
"O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
"Well, what now?" said the fish.
"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to be pope."
"Go home with you, she is pope already," said the fish.
So he went home, and he found himself before a great church, with palaces all round. He had to make his way through a crowd of people; and when he got inside he found the place lighted up with thousands and thousands of lights; and his wife was clothed in a golden garment, and sat upon a very high throne, and had three golden crowns on, all in the greatest priestly pomp; and on both sides of her there stood two rows of lights of all sizes-from the size of the longest tower to the smallest rushlight, and all the emperors and kings were kneeling before her and kissing her foot.
"Well, wife," said the man, and sat and stared at her, "so you are pope."
"Yes," said she, "now I am pope!"
And he went on gazing at her till he felt dazzled, as if he were sitting in the sun. And after a little time he said,
"Well, now, wife, what is there left to be, now you are pope?"
And she sat up very stiff and straight, and said nothing.
And he said again, "Well, wife, I hope you are contented at last with being pope; you can be nothing more."
"We will see about that," said the wife. With that they both went to bed; but she was as far as ever from being contented, and she could not get to sleep for thinking of what she should like to be next.
The husband, however, slept as fast as a top after his busy day; but the wife tossed and turned from side to side the whole night through, thinking all the while what she could be next, but nothing would occur to her; and when she saw the red dawn she slipped off the bed, and sat before the window to see the sun rise, and as it came up she said,
"Ah, I have it! what if I should make the sun and moon to rise-husband!"she cried, and stuck her elbow in his ribs, "wake up, and go to your fish, and tell him T want power over the sun and moon."
The man was so fast asleep that when he started up he fell out of bed. Then he shook himself together, and opened his eyes and said,
"Oh,-wife, what did you say?"
"Husband," said she, "if I cannot get the power of making the sun and moon rise when I want them, I shall never have another quiet hour. Go to the fish and tell him so."
"O wife!" said the man, and fell on his knees to her, "the fish can really not do that for you. I grant you he could make you emperor and pope; do be contented with that, I beg of you."
And she became wild with impatience, and screamed out,
"I can wait no longer, go at once!"
And so off he went as well as he could for fright. And a dreadful storm arose, so that he could hardly keep his feet; and the houses and trees were blown down, and the mountains trembled, and rocks fell in the sea; the sky was quite black, and it thundered and lightened; and the waves, crowned with foam, ran mountains high. So he cried out, without being able to hear his own words,
"O man, O man!-if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea- Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
"Well, what now?" said the flounder.
"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to order about the sun and moon."
"Go home with you!"said the flounder, "you will find her in the old hovel."
And there they are sitting to this very day.
昔、海のすぐちかくの豚小屋に、漁師がおかみさんと一緒に住んでいました。漁師は毎日魚釣りにでかけ、釣って、釣って、ひたすら釣りました。あるとき、竿を垂れて座り、きれいな水を眺めながら、ひたすら座っていました。すると糸がグイッと下がってずっと下までおりました。糸を引き上げてみると大きなヒラメがかかっていました。するとヒラメが言いました。「聞いてください、漁師さん、お願いです。命を助けてください。私は本当はヒラメではなく、魔法にかけられた王子なのです。私を殺して何になりますか。私を食べてもおいしくないです。また水に戻して、放してください。」「まあ、いいだろ」と漁師は言いました。「そんなに言わなくてもいいよ。口をいう魚なんてどっちにしても放してやるさ。」そう言って漁師はヒラメをきれいな水に戻しました。ヒラメは後ろに長い血のすじを残して、底に行きました。

それから猟師は立ち上がって豚小屋のおかみさんのところに帰りました。「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました。「今日は何もとれなかったの?」「ああ」と亭主は言いました。「実はヒラメを釣ったんだがね、そいつが魔法にかけられた王子だというもんだから、逃がしてやったよ。」「先に願い事を言わなかったのかい?」とおかみさんは言いました。「ああ、言わなかった。」と亭主は言いました。「何を願うんだい?」「まあ」とおかみさんは言いました。「こんな豚小屋でいつまでも暮らさなくちゃならないなんてとんでもないわ。臭くて胸が悪くなる。小さな家を願ってもよかったわよ。戻ってヒラメを呼んでごらんよ。それで小さい家が欲しいって言ってよ。きっとやってくれるわ。」「ええと」と亭主は言いました。「なんでまたそこへ行かなくちゃならないんだい?」「何で?」とおかみさんは言いました。「あんたはヒラメをつかまえたんだよ。そんでまた放してやったんじゃないか。きっとやってくれるから。すぐ行ってよ。」

亭主はやはりあまり行きたくありませんでしたが、おかみさんと争いたくもなかったので、海に行きました。そこに着くと海はすっかり緑と黄色になっていて、もう穏やかではありませんでした。それで漁師は立ったままで、「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。するとヒラメが泳いでやってきて、「それでおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」と言いました。「それがね」と漁師は言いました。「おれはたしかにあんたをつかまえたよ。それでかみさんは本当はおれが願い事をすればよかったと言うんだ。かみさんはもう豚小屋に住みたくないんだ。小さい家が欲しいって言うんだ。」「それじゃ、帰りな。」とヒラメは言いました。「もうおかみさんには小さな家があるよ。」

漁師が家に帰ると、おかみさんはもう豚小屋にはいませんでした。その代わりに小さな家が立っていて、おかみさんは戸口の前のベンチに座っていました。おかみさんは亭主の手をとり、「中に入って。ほら、ね、ずっといいでしょ?」と言いました。それで二人は入りましたが、小さな玄関、かわいい小さな居間と寝室、台所、食料置き場があって、最高の家具も備え付けてあり、錫や真鍮でできた最も美しい調理器具など何でもそろっていました。小さな家の後ろには小さな裏庭もあり、めんどりやあひるがいて、花や果物のなる木がある小さな庭園もありました。「ほら、すてきじゃない?」とおかみさんは言いました。「そうだな」と亭主は言いました。「ずっとそのままにしておこう。もうすっかりいい暮らしができるな。」「それは考えておきましょう。」とおかみさんは言いました。それで食事をして寝ました。

一、二週間万事うまくいったあと、おかみさんが、「ねえ、あんた、この家は狭すぎるし、畑も庭も小さいわ。ヒラメはもっと大きい家をくれたってよかったのに。大きな石作りのお城に住みたいな。ヒラメのところに行って、お城をくれって言ってよ。」と言いました。「なあ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「この小さい家で十分だよ。何でお城に住むんだ?」「何だって?」とおかみさんは言いました。「いいから行って来なさいよ。ヒラメはいつだってやってくれるさ。」「だめだよ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「ヒラメはおれたちにこの家をくれたばかりじゃないか。そんなに早く戻りたくないよ。ヒラメは怒るだろうよ。」「行けってば。」とおかみさんは言いました。「ヒラメは簡単にできるんだし、喜んでやってくれるさ。いいから行けってば。」

亭主は気が重く、行きたくありませんでした。心の中で「こんなの、おかしいよな」といいましたがそれでもでかけました。海に来ると水はすっかり紫と紺と灰色で濁っていて、もう緑と黄色ではありませんでしたが、それでも穏やかでした。漁師はそこに立って、「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。するとヒラメが泳いでやってきて、「それで今度はおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」と言いました。「ああ」と漁師は、半分びくびくして言いました。「かみさんは大きな石作りのお城に住みたいんだ。」「では帰りな。おかみさんは戸口の前に立っているよ。」とヒラメは言いました。

それで漁師は立ち去り、前の小さな家に帰るつもりでいましたが、そこに着いてみると、大きな石作りの宮殿がありました。おかみさんは階段に立って中に入ろうとしていて、亭主の手をとり、「入って」と言いました。それで亭主はおかみさんと一緒に入りました。お城の中に大理石を敷いた大広間があり、たくさんの部屋には純金の椅子やテーブルが並べられ、水晶のシャンデリアが天井から下がっていました。部屋や寝室にはどこもカーペットがしいてあり、最上の食べ物やワインがどのテーブルにもどっさりのっていて、重さでテーブルがくずれそうなくらいでした。家の後ろにも、大きな中庭があり、たくさんの馬や牛の小屋やとてもりっぱな馬車が並んでいました。とても美しい花々や実のなる木々があるすばらしい大きな庭園もあれば、半マイルもある公園があり、雄鹿や小鹿やうさぎなど欲しいなと思う動物がいました。「ねっ」とおかみさんは言いました。「すばらしくない?」「本当にな」と亭主は言いました。「今度はずっとこのままにしておこう。この美しい城で暮らして満足しよう。」「それは考えておきましょう。」とおかみさんは言いました。「まあ眠ってみてね。」それで二人は寝ました。

次の朝、おかみさんは先に目を覚まし、丁度夜明けで、ベッドから、目の前に広がる美しい土地が見えました。亭主はまだ伸びをしていたので、おかみさんはひじでわき腹をつつき、「起きて。あんた、窓から外を覗いてごらんな。見てごらん。私たち、あの土地みんなを治める王様になれないのかな?ヒラメのところに行って。王様になろうよ。」と言いました。「あのなあ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「何で王様にならなくちゃいけないんだよ。おれは王様になんかなりたくないよ。」「じゃあ」とおかみさんは言いました。「あんたがならないんなら、私がなるわ。ヒラメのところに行って。私は王様になるんだから。」「なあ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「お前はどうして王様になりたいんだ?おれはそんなことヒラメに言いたくないよ。」「いいじゃないのさ?」とおかみさんは言いました。「さっさと行って。私は王様にならなくちゃいけないの!」

それで亭主はでかけましたが、おかみさんが王様になりたいのですっかり落ち込んでいました。(こんなのおかしいよ、こんなのおかしいよ)と考えました。行きたくありませんでしたがやはり行きました。海に着くと、すっかり黒っぽい灰色になっていて、水が下から上がってきて、腐ったにおいがしました。それで亭主はそのそばに行って立ち、「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。「それで今度はおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」とヒラメが言いました。「ああ」と亭主は言いました。「王様になりたがっているんだ。」

「おかみさんのところにお帰り。もう王様だよ。」それで亭主は行き、宮殿に着くと、お城はさらに大きくなっていて、大きな塔と素晴らしい飾りがついて、戸口には門番が立っていました。それにたくさんの兵士がいて太鼓やラッパをもっていました。亭主が家の中にはいってみると、何でも本物の大理石と金でできていて、びろうどのカバーと大きな金の房がついていました。それから広間の戸が開けられ、豪華な宮廷があり、おかみさんが、金の大きな王冠を頭にのせ、純金と宝石でできた(しゃく)を手に持ち、金とダイヤでできた高い玉座に座っていました。両側には侍女が列を作り、それぞれが頭一つ前の人より背が低くなっていました。それで、亭主はおかみさんの前に行って立ち、「なんとまあ、お前、もう王様なんだね。」と言いました。「そうよ」とおかみさんは言いました。「もう王様よ。」それで立ったままおかみさんを見て、しばらくながめたあと、亭主は言いました。「お前は王様なんだから、他はみんなそのままにしておこうな。もう何も欲しいものはないよな。」

「違うよ、あんた」とおかみさんは、すっかりむしゃくしゃして言いました。「時間の経つのが遅くて遅くて。もう我慢ならないよ。ヒラメのところへ行って。わたしゃ王様だけど皇帝にもならなくちゃ。」「なんと!お前なあ、なんで皇帝になりたいんだ?」「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました、「ヒラメのところへ行って。皇帝になるんだから。」「ああ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「ヒラメはお前を皇帝にできないよ。それを魚に言ってはいけないよ。皇帝は国に一人しかいないんだ。皇帝にヒラメはできないよ。できないにきまってる。」「何だって?」とおかみさんは言いました。「私は王様だよ。あんたはただの亭主じゃないか。今すぐ行くのよ。さっさと行って。王様にできるんなら皇帝にできるさ。皇帝になるの。すぐ行って。」それで亭主は行くしかありませんでした。

ところが、亭主は歩きながら、悩んでいて、「こんなの無事に済むわけない、こんなの無事に済むわけない、皇帝なんて恥知らずもいいところだ。ヒラメもとうとう嫌になるさ」と思っていました。そう考えながら、海につきました。海はすっかり黒く濁っていて、下からぼこぼこ沸き上がって泡が立っていました。その海の上を肌を突き刺すような冷たい風が吹いて泡が固まりました。亭主は恐ろしく思いました。それからそばに行って立ち、「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。「それで今度はおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」とヒラメが言いました。「ああ」と亭主は言いました。「皇帝になりたがっているんだ。」 「おかみさんのところにお帰り。もう皇帝だよ。」

それで亭主は行き、そこに着くと、宮殿はつやつや光った大理石でできており、雪花石膏の像が立ち、金の飾りがいろいろついていました。兵士たちが入口の前でラッパを吹いたりシンバルや太鼓をたたいたりして行進していました。家の中には男爵、伯爵、公爵が家来として行き来していました。それから亭主に戸をあけてくれましたが、その戸は純金でできていて、高さがたっぷり2マイルはありました。おかみさんは、3ヤードの高さのダイヤやザクロ石をちりばめた大きな冠をかぶり、片手に笏を、もう一方の手には宝珠をもっていました。それで両側には二列の親衛兵が並び、だんだん前の人より背が低くなっていったので、一番大きい2マイルの巨人から、一番小さい私の小指くらいしかない小人までいました。その前に大勢の王子や公爵がいました。

それで亭主は行ってその人たちの間に立ち、言いました。「お前、もう皇帝なのか?」「そうよ」とおかみさんは言いました。「私は皇帝よ。」それで立ったままおかみさんをよく見て、しばらくながめたあと、亭主は言いました。「なあ、お前、満足してくれ、もうお前は皇帝なんだからな。」「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました。「どうしてそこにつっ立ってるの?今私は皇帝よ。だけど私は法王にもなるの。ヒラメのところに行って。」「えっ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「それは望めないよ。お前は法王になれない。法王はキリスト教徒全部の中でたった一人だけだ。ヒラメはお前を法王にはできないよ。」「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました。「わたしゃ、法王になるんだよ。すぐ行っといで。今日すぐに法王になるんだから。」「だめだ、お前」と亭主は言いました。「そんなことヒラメに言いたくないよ。そんなのよくないよ。あんまりだ。ヒラメはお前を法王にできないさ。」「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました。「馬鹿なことを言うんじゃないの!皇帝を作れるんなら、法王だって作れるわ。すぐ行って。私は皇帝よ。あんたはただの亭主じゃない。すぐに行け。」

それで亭主はこわくなりでかけましたが、もうすっかり気が抜けてぼうっとなり、体が震え、膝や脚はがくがくしていました。暴風が陸地に吹きあれ、雲が飛んで、夕方にかけて辺りは暗くなり、葉っぱが木々から落ち、水は沸きかえっているように上がってごうごう唸り、岸にはね返りました。遠くに何隻か見える船が波間に揺れ、難破して大砲を撃っていました。それでも空の真ん中にはまだ、ひどい嵐のようにまわりは赤かったけれども、小さい青空がありました。それで、絶望感でいっぱいになりながら、亭主はひどくおびえて行って立ち、言いました。「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。「それで今度はおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」とヒラメが言いました。「ああ」と亭主は言いました。「法王になりたがっているんだ。」「おかみさんのところにお帰り。もう法王だよ。」とヒラメは言いました。

それで亭主は帰り、そこに着くと、宮殿にかこまれた大きな教会のようなものが見えました。亭主は人がきをかき分けて進みました。ところで、中は何千何万というろうそくで明るく照らされていました。おかみさんは金を身にまとい、ずっと高い玉座に座り、三つの大きな冠をかぶり、まわりは宗教的な荘厳さにつつまれていました。両側には一列のろうそくがたっていて、一番大きいのはとても高い塔くらいあり、一番小さいのは台所のろうそくくらいでした。皇帝や王様たちがおかみさんの前に膝まづいて靴に口づけしていました。「お前」と亭主は言い、注意しておかみさんを見ました。「もう法王なのか?」「そうよ」とおかみさんは言いました。「私は法王よ。」それで亭主は立ったまま、おかみさんを眺めましたが、まるでまばゆい太陽を見ているようでした。こうして短い間おかみさんを立って見た後、「あのなあ、お前、お前が法王なら、こうしておこうな。」と言いました。しかしおかみさんは柱のようにこわばってみえ、ちっとも動かないで生きているように見えませんでした。それで亭主は「お前、もう法王なんだから、満足してくれ。もうこれ以上のものになれないよ。」と言いました。「考えてみるわ。」とおかみさんは言いました。

それで二人は寝ましたが、おかみさんは満足していませんでした。他になるものが残っていないかとずっと考え、欲張っていたので眠れませんでした。亭主の方はぐっすり眠りました。というのは日中たくさん走り回っていたからです。しかしおかみさんは全く眠れなくて、一晩じゅうあちこち寝返りをうって、もっとなれるものが残ってないのか考えてばかりいましたが、他に何も思い浮かびませんでした。

とうとう太陽が昇り始め、おかみさんは夜明けの赤い空をみると、ベッドに起きあがり、じっとそれを眺めました。そのとき、窓から、太陽がこんなふうに昇っていくのが見え、「私も太陽や月に昇る命令をだせないかしら?」と言いました。「ねえ、あんた」とおかみさんはひじで亭主のわき腹をつつき言いました。「目を覚ましてよ。ヒラメのところに行って。私は神様と同じになりたいんだから。」亭主はまだ半分眠っていましたが、あまりにぎょっとしてベッドから転げ落ちました。

何か聞き間違いをしたんだと思い、目をこすり、言いました。「お前、何を言ってるんだい?」「あんた」とおかみさんは言いました。「太陽や月に昇る命令をだせなくて、太陽や月が昇るのを眺めなくちゃいけないのは我慢できないのよ。自分で昇らせなければ一時も幸せだって思えない。」それから亭主をとても恐ろしい目で見たので、亭主はぞっとしました。おかみさんは「直ぐに行ってよ。神様みたいになるんだから。」と言いました。「ああ、お前なあ」と亭主はおかみさんの前に膝まづきながら言いました。「ヒラメはそんなことできないさ。皇帝や法王はできるよ。お願いだよ。今のままでいてくれ。法王でいろよ。」するとおかみさんはひどく怒り、髪の毛を振り乱し、自分の胴着をバリっと破り広げ、亭主を足で蹴り、喚きました。「がまんできない、もう我慢できないんだよ。さっとと行け」

それで亭主はズボンを履き狂ったように走っていきました。しかし、外は大嵐が荒れ狂っていて、風がものすごく、ほとんど立っていられませんでした。家や木が吹き倒され、山々は揺れ、岩が海に転げ落ちました。空は真っ暗で雷が鳴り稲妻が走りました。海は教会の塔や山ほど高く黒いうねりになっておしよせ、上は白い泡になっていました。それで亭主は叫びましたが、自分の言葉がきこえませんでした。「ヒラメ、海のヒラメ、お願いだ、聞いてくれ、うちのかみさんのイザベルがおれのいうことをきかないから。」と言いました。「それで今度はおかみさんは何を望んでいるんだい?」とヒラメが言いました。「ああ」と亭主は言いました。「神様と同じになりたがっているんだ。」「おかみさんのところにお帰り。また豚小屋に戻っているよ。」そしてそこに二人は今も住んでいます。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.