ENGLISH

Cinderella

PORTUGUÊS

Cinderela


There was once a rich man whose wife lay sick, and when she felt her end drawing near she called to her only daughter to come near her bed, and said, "Dear child, be pious and good, and God will always take care of you, and I will look down upon you from heaven, and will be with you." And then she closed her eyes and expired. The maiden went every day to her mother's grave and wept, and was always pious and good. When the winter came the snow covered the grave with a white covering, and when the sun came in the early spring and melted it away, the man took to himself another wife.

The new wife brought two daughters home with her, and they were beautiful and fair in appearance, but at heart were, black and ugly. And then began very evil times for the poor step-daughter. "Is the stupid creature to sit in the same room with us?" said they; "those who eat food must earn it. Out upon her for a kitchen-maid!" They took away her pretty dresses, and put on her an old grey kirtle, and gave her wooden shoes to wear. "Just look now at the proud princess, how she is decked out!" cried they laughing, and then they sent her into the kitchen. There she was obliged to do heavy work from morning to night, get up early in the morning, draw water, make the fires, cook, and wash. Besides that, the sisters did their utmost to torment her, mocking her, and strewing peas and lentils among the ashes, and setting her to pick them up. In the evenings, when she was quite tired out with her hard day's work, she had no bed to lie on, but was obliged to rest on the hearth among the cinders. And as she always looked dusty and dirty, they named her Cinderella.

It happened one day that the father went to the fair, and he asked his two step-daughters what he should bring back for them. "Fine clothes!" said one. "Pearls and jewels!" said the other. "But what will you have, Cinderella?" said he. "The first twig, father, that strikes against your hat on the way home; that is what I should like you to bring me." So he bought for the two step-daughters fine clothes, pearls, and jewels, and on his way back, as he rode through a green lane, a hazel-twig struck against his hat; and he broke it off and carried it home with him. And when he reached home he gave to the step-daughters what they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the hazel-twig. She thanked him, and went to her mother's grave, and planted this twig there, weeping so bitterly that the tears fell upon it and watered it, and it flourished and became a fine tree. Cinderella went to see it three times a day, and wept and prayed, and each time a white bird rose up from the tree, and if she uttered any wish the bird brought her whatever she had wished for.

Now if came to pass that the king ordained a festival that should last for three days, and to which all the beautiful young women of that country were bidden, so that the king's son might choose a bride from among them. When the two stepdaughters heard that they too were bidden to appear, they felt very pleased, and they called Cinderella, and said, "Comb our hair, brush our shoes, and make our buckles fast, we are going to the wedding feast at the king's castle." Cinderella, when she heard this, could not help crying, for she too would have liked to go to the dance, and she begged her step-mother to allow her. "What, you Cinderella!" said she, "in all your dust and dirt, you want to go to the festival! you that have no dress and no shoes! you want to dance!" But as she persisted in asking, at last the step-mother said, "I have strewed a dish-full of lentils in the ashes, and if you can pick them all up again in two hours you may go with us." Then the maiden went to the backdoor that led into the garden, and called out, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

Then there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and after them some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes; and the doves nodded with their heads, and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. Before an hour was over all was done, and they flew away. Then the maiden brought the dish to her step-mother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go to the feast; but the step-mother said, "No, Cinderella, you have no proper clothes, and you do not know how to dance, and you would be laughed at!" And when Cinderella cried for disappointment, she added, "If you can pick two dishes full of lentils out of the ashes, nice and clean, you shall go with us," thinking to herself, "for that is not possible." When she had strewed two dishes full of lentils among the ashes the maiden went through the backdoor into the garden, and cried, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

So there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and then some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the other birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes, and the doves nodded with their heads and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. And before half-an-hour was over it was all done, and they flew away. Then the maiden took the dishes to the stepmother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go with them to the feast; but she said "All this is of no good to you; you cannot come with us, for you have no proper clothes, and cannot dance; you would put us to shame." Then she turned her back on poor Cinderella, and made haste to set out with her two proud daughters.

And as there was no one left in the house, Cinderella went to her mother's grave, under the hazel bush, and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and a pair of slippers embroidered with silk and silver. , And in all haste she put on the dress and went to the festival. But her step-mother and sisters did not know her, and thought she must be a foreign princess, she looked so beautiful in her golden dress. Of Cinderella they never thought at all, and supposed that she was sitting at home, arid picking the lentils out of the ashes. The King's son came to meet her, and took her by the hand and danced with her, and he refused to stand up with any one else, so that he might not be obliged to let go her hand; and when any one came to claim it he answered, "She is my partner."

And when the evening came she wanted to go home, but the prince said he would go with her to take care of her, for he wanted to see where the beautiful maiden lived. But she escaped him, and jumped up into the pigeon-house. Then the prince waited until the father came, and told him the strange maiden had jumped into the pigeon-house. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for axes and hatchets, and had the pigeon-house cut down, but there was no one in it. And when they entered the house there sat Cinderella in her dirty clothes among the cinders, and a little oil-lamp burnt dimly in the chimney; for Cinderella had been very quick, and had jumped out of the pigeon-house again, and had run to the hazel bush; and there she had taken off her beautiful dress and had laid it on the grave, and the bird had carried it away again, and then she had put on her little gray kirtle again, and had sat down in. the kitchen among the cinders.

The next day, when the festival began anew, and the parents and step-sisters had gone to it, Cinderella went to the hazel bush and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a still more splendid dress than on the day before. And when she appeared in it among the guests every one was astonished at her beauty. The prince had been waiting until she came, and he took her hand and danced with her alone. And when any one else came to invite her he said, "She is my partner." And when the evening came she wanted to go home, and the prince followed her, for he wanted to see to what house she belonged; but she broke away from him, and ran into the garden at the back of the house. There stood a fine large tree, bearing splendid pears; she leapt as lightly as a squirrel among the branches, and the prince did not know what had become of her. So he waited until the father came, and then he told him that the strange maiden had rushed from him, and that he thought she had gone up into the pear-tree. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for an axe, and felled the tree, but there was no one in it. And when they went into the kitchen there sat Cinderella among the cinders, as usual, for she had got down the other side of the tree, and had taken back her beautiful clothes to the bird on the hazel bush, and had put on her old grey kirtle again.

On the third day, when the parents and the step-children had set off, Cinderella went again to her mother's grave, and said to the tree,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a dress, the like of which had never been seen for splendour and brilliancy, and slippers that were of gold. And when she appeared in this dress at the feast nobody knew what to say for wonderment. The prince danced with her alone, and if any one else asked her he answered, "She is my partner."

And when it was evening Cinderella wanted to go home, and the prince was about to go with her, when she ran past him so quickly that he could not follow her. But he had laid a plan, and had caused all the steps to be spread with pitch, so that as she rushed down them the left shoe of the maiden remained sticking in it. The prince picked it up, and saw that it was of gold, and very small and slender. The next morning he went to the father and told him that none should be his bride save the one whose foot the golden shoe should fit. Then the two sisters were very glad, because they had pretty feet. The eldest went to her room to try on the shoe, and her mother stood by. But she could not get her great toe into it, for the shoe was too small; then her mother handed her a knife, and said, "Cut the toe off, for when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut her toe off, squeezed her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince. Then he took her with him on his horse as his bride, and rode off. They had to pass by the grave, and there sat the two pigeons on the hazel bush, and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her shoe, and saw the blood flowing. And he turned his horse round and took the false bride home again, saying she was not the right one, and that the other sister must try on the shoe. So she went into her room to do so, and got her toes comfortably in, but her heel was too large. Then her mother handed her the knife, saying, "Cut a piece off your heel; when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut a piece off her heel, and thrust her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince, who took his bride before him on his horse and rode off. When they passed by the hazel bush the two pigeons sat there and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her foot, and saw how the blood was flowing from the shoe, and staining the white stocking. And he turned his horse round and brought the false bride home again. "This is not the right one," said he, "have you no other daughter?" - "No," said the man, "only my dead wife left behind her a little stunted Cinderella; it is impossible that she can be the bride." But the King's son ordered her to be sent for, but the mother said, "Oh no! she is much too dirty, I could not let her be seen." But he would have her fetched, and so Cinderella had to appear. First she washed her face and hands quite clean, and went in and curtseyed to the prince, who held out to her the golden shoe. Then she sat down on a stool, drew her foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and slipped it into the golden one, which fitted it perfectly. And when she stood up, and the prince looked in her face, he knew again the beautiful maiden that had danced with him, and he cried, "This is the right bride!" The step-mother and the two sisters were thunderstruck, and grew pale with anger; but he put Cinderella before him on his horse and rode off. And as they passed the hazel bush, the two white pigeons cried,

"There they go, there they go!
No blood on her shoe;
The shoe's not too small,
The right bride is she after all."

And when they had thus cried, they came flying after and perched on Cinderella's shoulders, one on the right, the other on the left, and so remained.

And when her wedding with the prince was appointed to be held the false sisters came, hoping to curry favour, and to take part in the festivities. So as the bridal procession went to the church, the eldest walked on the right side and the younger on the left, and the pigeons picked out an eye of each of them. And as they returned the elder was on the left side and the younger on the right, and the pigeons picked out the other eye of each of them. And so they were condemned to go blind for the rest of their days because of their wickedness and falsehood.
Era uma vez um homem muito rico, cuja mulher adoeceu. Esta, quando sentiu o fim aproximar-se, chamou a sua única filha à cabeceira e disse-lhe com muito amor:
-Amada filha, continua sempre boa e piedosa. O amor de Deus há de acompanhar-te sempre. Lá do céu velarei sempre por ti.
E dito isto, fechou os olhos e morreu.
A menina ia todos os dias para junto do túmulo da mãe chorar e regar a terra com suas lágrimas. E continuou boa e piedosa. Quando o inverno chegou, a neve fria e gelada da Europa cobriu o túmulo com um manto branco de neve. Quando o sol da primavera o derreteu, o seu pai casou-se com uma mulher ambiciosa e cruel que já tinha duas filhas parecidas com ela em tudo.

Mal se cruzou com elas a pobre órfã percebeu que nada de bom podia esperar delas, pois logo que a viram disseram-lhe com desprezo:
- O que é que esta moleca faz aqui? Vai para a cozinha, que é lá o teu lugar!!!
E a madrasta acrescentou:
- Têm razão, filhas. Ela será nossa empregada e terá que ganhar o pão com o seu trabalho diário.
Tiraram-lhe os seus lindos vestidos, vestiram-lhe um vestido muito velho e deram-lhe tamancos de madeira para calçar.
- E agora já para a cozinha! - disseram elas, rindo.

E, a partir desse dia, a menina passou a trabalhar arduamente, desde que o sol nascia até altas horas da noite: ia buscar água ao poço, acendia a lareira, cozinhava, lavava a roupa, costurava, esfregava o chão...
À noite, extenuada de trabalho, não tinha uma cama para descansar. Deitava-se perto da lareira, junto ao borralho (cinzas), razão pela qual puseram-lhe o apelido de Gata Borralheira.
Os dias se passavam e a sorte da menina não se alterava. Pelo contrário, as exigências da madrasta e das suas filhas eram cada vez maiores.
Um dia, o pai ia para a cidade e perguntou às duas enteadas o que queriam que ele lhes trouxesse.
- Lindos vestidos - disse uma.
- Jóias - disse a outra.
- E tu, filhinha, Gata Borralheira, o que queres? - perguntou-lhe o pai.
- Um ramo verde da primeira árvore que encontrares no caminho de volta.
Terminada a compra, ele comprou os vestidos para as enteadas e as jóias que tinham pedido e no caminho de regresso cortou para a filha um ramo da primeira árvore que encontrou. De uma Oliveira.
Ao chegar em casa, deu às enteadas o que lhe tinham pedido e entregou à filha um galho de oliveira, árvore que produz azitonas. Ela correu para junto do túmulo da mãe, enterrou o ramo na terra e chorou tanto que as lágrimas o regaram. Começou a crescer e tornou-se uma bela árvore.
A menina continuou a visitar o túmulo da mãe todos os dias e certa vez ouviu uma bonita pomba branca dizer-lhe:
- Não chores mais, minha querida. Lembra-te que, a partir de agora, cumprirei todos os teus desejos.
Pouco depois o rei anunciou a todo o reino que ia dar uma festa durante três dias para a qual estavam convidadas todas as jovens que queriam casar-se, a fim de que o príncipe herdeiro pudesse escolher a sua futura esposa.
Imediatamente as duas filhas da madrasta chamaram a Gata Borralheira e disseram-lhe:
- Penteia-nos e veste-nos, pois temos que ir ao baile do príncipe para que ele possa escolher qual de nós duas será a sua esposa.
A Gata Borralheira obedeceu humildemente. Mas quando viu as duas luxuosamente vestidas, desatou a chorar e suplicou à madrasta que também a deixasse ir ao baile.
- Ao baile, tu??? - respondeu ela - Já te olhaste ao espelho?
A madrasta, face à insistência da Gata Borralheira, acrescentou, ao mesmo tempo que atirava um pote de lentilhas para as cinzas:
- Está bem! Se separares as lentilhas em duas horas, irás conosco.
A menina saiu para o jardim a chorar e lembrando-se do que a pomba lhe tinha dito, expressou o seu primeiro desejo:
- Dócil pombinha, rolinhas e todos os passarinhos do céu, venham ajudar-me a separar as lentilhas.
- Os grãos bons no prato, e os maus no papo.

Duas pombinhas brancas, seguidas de duas rolinhas e de uma nuvem de passarinhos entraram pela janela da cozinha, e começaram a bicar as lentilhas. E muito antes de terminarem as duas horas concedidas, separaram as lentilhas. Entusiasmada, a menina foi mostrar à madrasta o prato com as lentilhas escolhidas. - Muito bem. – disse a madrasta, com ironia - Mas que vestido vais usar? E além disso, tu não sabes, dançar. Será melhor ficares em casa.
Desconsolada, a Gata Borralheira começou a chorar, ajoelhou-se aos pés da madrasta e voltou a suplicar-lhe que a deixasse ir ao baile.
- Está bem. - disse ela com cinismo - Dou-te outra oportunidade.
E voltou a espalhar dois potes de lentilhas sobre as cinzas.
- Se conseguires escolher as lentilhas numa hora, irás ao baile.
A doce menina saiu a correr para o jardim e gritou:
- Dóceis pombinhos, rolinhas e todos os passarinhos do céu, venham ajudar-me a separar as lentilhas.
- Os grãos bons no prato, e os ruins no papo.
De novo, duas pombas brancas entraram pela janela da cozinha, depois as pequenas rolas e um bando de passarinhos, e pic-pic-pic escolheram-nas e voaram para sair por onde entraram.
A menina logo correu e mostrou à madrasta as lentilhas escolhidas, mas de nada lhe serviu.
- Deixa-me em paz com as tuas lentilhas! Vaias ficar em casa e pronto! Ponto final! E cest fini. pronuncia-se: Cé finí).
Virou-lhe as costas e chamou as filhas.

Quando já não havia ninguém em casa, a Gata Borralheira foi junto ao túmulo da mãe, debaixo da oliveira, e gritou:
- Árvorezinha. Toca a abanar e a sacudir. Atira ouro e prata para eu me vestir.
A pomba que lhe tinha oferecido ajuda, apareceu sobre um ramo e, estendendo as asas, transformou os seus farrapos num lindíssimo vestido de baile e os seus tamancos em luxuosos sapatos bordados a ouro e prata.
Quando entrou no salão de baile, todos os presentes se admiraram perante tamanha beleza. Mas as mais surpreendidas foram as duas filhas da madrasta que estavam convencidas que seriam as mais belas da festa. Porém, nem elas, nem a madrasta ou o pai reconheceram a Gata Borralheira.
O príncipe ficou fascinado ao vê-la. Tomou-a pela mão e os dois começaram o baile. Durante toda a noite esteve ao seu lado e não permitiu que mais ninguém dançasse com ela.


Chegado o momento de se despedirem, o príncipe ofereceu-se para acompanhá-la, pois ardia de desejo por saber quem era aquela jovem e onde morava. Mas ela deu uma desculpa para se retirar por momentos e aproveitou para abandonar o palácio a correr e deixar em baixo de uma árvore o seu formoso vestido e os sapatos.
A pomba, que estava à sua espera, pegou neles com as suas patinhas e desapareceu na escuridão da noite. Ela vestiu o vestido cinzento, o avental e os tamancos e, como de costume, deitou-se junto à chaminé e adormeceu. No dia seguinte, quando se aproximou a hora do início do segundo baile, esperou até ouvir partir a carruagem e correu para junto da árvore:
- Árvorezinha. Toca a abanar e a sacudir. Atira ouro e prata para me vestir.

E de novo apareceu a pomba e a vestiu com um vestido ainda mais lindo que o da noite anterior e calçou-lhe uns sapatos que pareciam de ouro puro.A sua aparição no palácio causou sensação maior ainda do que da primeira vez. O próprio príncipe, que a esperava impaciente, sentiu-se ainda mais deslumbrado. Pegou-lhe na mão e, de novo, dançou com ela toda a noite.

Ao chegar a hora da despedida, o príncipe voltou a oferecer-se para acompanhá-la, mas ela insistiu que preferia voltar sozinha para casa. Mas desta vez o príncipe seguiu-a. De repente, parecia que tinha sido engolida pelo chão. Em vez de entrar em casa, a jovem Gata Borralheira, de vergonha, escondeu-se atrás de uma frondosa oliveira que havia no jardim. O príncipe continuou a procurá-la pelas redondezas, até que decepcionado regressou ao palácio.
A Gata Borralheira abandonou então o seu esconderijo, e quando a madrasta e as filhas chegaram ela já tinha tirado as vestes faustosas (bonitas) e posto os seus trapos velhos.
No terceiro dia, quando o pai fustigou o cavalo e a carruagem se afastou com a sua a esposa e filhas, a menina aproximou-se de novo da árvore e disse:
- Árvorezinha. Toca a abanar e a sacudir. Atira ouro e prata para me vestir.
E a pomba, uma vez mais, trouxe-lhe um vestido de sonho, de seda com aplicações de suntuoso chale e uns sapatos bordados a ouro para os seus pequeninos e delicados pés. E depois, colocou-lhe sobre os ombros uma capa de veludo dourado.
Quando entrou no salão de baile, a belíssima Gata Borralheira foi recebida com uma exclamação de assombro por parte de todos os presentes.
O príncipe apressou-se a beijar-lhe a mão e a abrir o baile, não se separando dela toda a noite.
Pouco antes da meia-noite, a jovem despediu-se do príncipe e pôs-se a correr. O príncipe não conseguiu alcançá-la mas encontrou na escadaria uns sapatinhos dourados que ela tinha perdido durante a sua precipitada fuga. Apanhou-o e apertou-o contra o coração.

Na manhã seguinte, mandou os seus mensageiros difundirem por todo o reino que se casaria com aquela que conseguisse calçar o precioso sapato.
Depois de todas as princesas, duquesas e condessas o terem inutilmente experimentado, ordenou aos seus emissários que o sapato fosse provado por todas as jovens, qualquer que fosse a sua condição social e financeira.
Quando chegaram à casa onde vivia a Gata Borralheira, a irmã mais velha insistiu que devia ser ela a primeira a experimentar e, acompanhada pela mãe que já a imaginava rainha, subiu ao quarto, convencida que lhe servia. Mas o seu pé era demasiado grande. Então a mãe, furiosa, obrigou-a a calçá-lo à força, dizendo-lhe:
- Embora te aperte agora, não te preocupes. Pensa que em breve serás rainha e não terás que andar a pé nunca mais.
A jovem disfarçou a dor que sentia e subiu para a carruagem, apresentando-se diante do filho do rei.
Embora ele tenha notado de imediato que aquela não era a bela desconhecida que conhecera no baile, teve que considerá-la como sua prometida. Montou-a no seu cavalo e foram juntos dar um passeio. Mas, ao passar diante de uma frondosa árvore, viu sobre os seus ramos duas pombas brancas que o advertiram:
- Olha para o pé da donzela, e verás que o sapato não é dela...
O príncipe desmontou e tirou-lhe o sapato. E ao ver como o pé estava roxo e inchado, percebeu que tinha sido enganado. Voltou à casa e ordenou que a outra irmã experimentasse o sapato.
A irmã mais nova subiu ao quarto, acompanhada da mãe, e tentou calçá-lo. Mas o seu pé também era demasiado grande.
E a mãe obrigou-a a calçá-lo à força, dizendo-lhe:
- Embora te aperte agora, não te preocupes. Pensa que em breve serás rainha e não terás que andar a pé nunca mais.
A filha obedeceu, enfiou o pé no sapato e, dissimulando a dor, apresentou-se ao príncipe que, apesar de ver que ela não era a bela desconhecida do baile, teve que considerá-la como sua prometida. Montou-a no seu cavalo e levou-a a passear pelo mesmo sítio onde levara a sua irmã. Ao passar diante da árvore onde estavam as duas pombas, ouviu-as de novo adverti-lo:
- Olha para o pé da donzela, e verás que o sapato não é dela...
O príncipe tirou-lhe o sapato e ao ver que tinha o pé ainda mais inchado que a irmã, percebeu que também ela o tinha enganado.
- Aqui vos trago esta impostora. E dai graças a Deus por não ordenar que sejam castigadas. Mas se ainda tendes outra filha, estou disposto a dar-vos nova oportunidade e eu mesmo lhe calçarei o sapato.
- Não. Não temos mais filhas - disse a madrasta.
Mas o pai acrescentou:
- Bem, a verdade é que tenho uma filha do meu primeiro casamento, aa qual vive conosco. É ela que faz a limpeza da casa e por isso anda sempre suja. É a Gata Borralheira.
- As minhas ordens dizem que todas as jovens sem exceção devem experimentar o sapato. Tragam-na à minha presença. Eu mesmo lho calçarei.
A Gata Borralheira tirou um dos pesados tamancos e calçou o sapato sem o menor esforço. Coube-lhe perfeitamente.
O príncipe, maravilhado, olhou bem para ela e reconheceu a formosa donzela com quem tinha dançado.
- A minha amada desconhecida! - exclamou ele - Só tu serás minha dona e senhora.
O príncipe, radiante de felicidade, sentou-a ao seu lado no cavalo e tomou o mesmo caminho por onde tinha ido com as duas impostoras. Pouco depois, ao aproximar-se da árvore onde estavam as pombas, ouviu-as dizer:
- Continua, Príncipe , a tua cavalgada, pois a dona do sapato já foi encontrada.
As pombas pousaram sobre os ombros da jovem e os seus farrapos transformaram-se no deslumbrante vestido que ela tinha levado ao último baile.
Chegaram ao palácio e de imediato foi celebrado o casamento. Quando os habitantes do reino souberam da forma como o maado e desnaturado pai, a madrasta e as duas filhas tinham tratado aquela que agora era a sua adorada princesa, começaram a desprezá-los de tal modo que eles tiveram que abandonar o país.
A princesa, fiel à promessa feita à mãe, continuou a ser piedosa e bondosa como sempre e continuou a visitar o seu túmulo e a orar debaixo da árvore, testemunha de tantas dores e alegrias.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.