ENGLISH

Cinderella

TIẾNG VIỆT

Cô lọ lem


There was once a rich man whose wife lay sick, and when she felt her end drawing near she called to her only daughter to come near her bed, and said, "Dear child, be pious and good, and God will always take care of you, and I will look down upon you from heaven, and will be with you." And then she closed her eyes and expired. The maiden went every day to her mother's grave and wept, and was always pious and good. When the winter came the snow covered the grave with a white covering, and when the sun came in the early spring and melted it away, the man took to himself another wife.

The new wife brought two daughters home with her, and they were beautiful and fair in appearance, but at heart were, black and ugly. And then began very evil times for the poor step-daughter. "Is the stupid creature to sit in the same room with us?" said they; "those who eat food must earn it. Out upon her for a kitchen-maid!" They took away her pretty dresses, and put on her an old grey kirtle, and gave her wooden shoes to wear. "Just look now at the proud princess, how she is decked out!" cried they laughing, and then they sent her into the kitchen. There she was obliged to do heavy work from morning to night, get up early in the morning, draw water, make the fires, cook, and wash. Besides that, the sisters did their utmost to torment her, mocking her, and strewing peas and lentils among the ashes, and setting her to pick them up. In the evenings, when she was quite tired out with her hard day's work, she had no bed to lie on, but was obliged to rest on the hearth among the cinders. And as she always looked dusty and dirty, they named her Cinderella.

It happened one day that the father went to the fair, and he asked his two step-daughters what he should bring back for them. "Fine clothes!" said one. "Pearls and jewels!" said the other. "But what will you have, Cinderella?" said he. "The first twig, father, that strikes against your hat on the way home; that is what I should like you to bring me." So he bought for the two step-daughters fine clothes, pearls, and jewels, and on his way back, as he rode through a green lane, a hazel-twig struck against his hat; and he broke it off and carried it home with him. And when he reached home he gave to the step-daughters what they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the hazel-twig. She thanked him, and went to her mother's grave, and planted this twig there, weeping so bitterly that the tears fell upon it and watered it, and it flourished and became a fine tree. Cinderella went to see it three times a day, and wept and prayed, and each time a white bird rose up from the tree, and if she uttered any wish the bird brought her whatever she had wished for.

Now if came to pass that the king ordained a festival that should last for three days, and to which all the beautiful young women of that country were bidden, so that the king's son might choose a bride from among them. When the two stepdaughters heard that they too were bidden to appear, they felt very pleased, and they called Cinderella, and said, "Comb our hair, brush our shoes, and make our buckles fast, we are going to the wedding feast at the king's castle." Cinderella, when she heard this, could not help crying, for she too would have liked to go to the dance, and she begged her step-mother to allow her. "What, you Cinderella!" said she, "in all your dust and dirt, you want to go to the festival! you that have no dress and no shoes! you want to dance!" But as she persisted in asking, at last the step-mother said, "I have strewed a dish-full of lentils in the ashes, and if you can pick them all up again in two hours you may go with us." Then the maiden went to the backdoor that led into the garden, and called out, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

Then there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and after them some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes; and the doves nodded with their heads, and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. Before an hour was over all was done, and they flew away. Then the maiden brought the dish to her step-mother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go to the feast; but the step-mother said, "No, Cinderella, you have no proper clothes, and you do not know how to dance, and you would be laughed at!" And when Cinderella cried for disappointment, she added, "If you can pick two dishes full of lentils out of the ashes, nice and clean, you shall go with us," thinking to herself, "for that is not possible." When she had strewed two dishes full of lentils among the ashes the maiden went through the backdoor into the garden, and cried, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

So there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and then some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the other birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes, and the doves nodded with their heads and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. And before half-an-hour was over it was all done, and they flew away. Then the maiden took the dishes to the stepmother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go with them to the feast; but she said "All this is of no good to you; you cannot come with us, for you have no proper clothes, and cannot dance; you would put us to shame." Then she turned her back on poor Cinderella, and made haste to set out with her two proud daughters.

And as there was no one left in the house, Cinderella went to her mother's grave, under the hazel bush, and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and a pair of slippers embroidered with silk and silver. , And in all haste she put on the dress and went to the festival. But her step-mother and sisters did not know her, and thought she must be a foreign princess, she looked so beautiful in her golden dress. Of Cinderella they never thought at all, and supposed that she was sitting at home, arid picking the lentils out of the ashes. The King's son came to meet her, and took her by the hand and danced with her, and he refused to stand up with any one else, so that he might not be obliged to let go her hand; and when any one came to claim it he answered, "She is my partner."

And when the evening came she wanted to go home, but the prince said he would go with her to take care of her, for he wanted to see where the beautiful maiden lived. But she escaped him, and jumped up into the pigeon-house. Then the prince waited until the father came, and told him the strange maiden had jumped into the pigeon-house. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for axes and hatchets, and had the pigeon-house cut down, but there was no one in it. And when they entered the house there sat Cinderella in her dirty clothes among the cinders, and a little oil-lamp burnt dimly in the chimney; for Cinderella had been very quick, and had jumped out of the pigeon-house again, and had run to the hazel bush; and there she had taken off her beautiful dress and had laid it on the grave, and the bird had carried it away again, and then she had put on her little gray kirtle again, and had sat down in. the kitchen among the cinders.

The next day, when the festival began anew, and the parents and step-sisters had gone to it, Cinderella went to the hazel bush and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a still more splendid dress than on the day before. And when she appeared in it among the guests every one was astonished at her beauty. The prince had been waiting until she came, and he took her hand and danced with her alone. And when any one else came to invite her he said, "She is my partner." And when the evening came she wanted to go home, and the prince followed her, for he wanted to see to what house she belonged; but she broke away from him, and ran into the garden at the back of the house. There stood a fine large tree, bearing splendid pears; she leapt as lightly as a squirrel among the branches, and the prince did not know what had become of her. So he waited until the father came, and then he told him that the strange maiden had rushed from him, and that he thought she had gone up into the pear-tree. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for an axe, and felled the tree, but there was no one in it. And when they went into the kitchen there sat Cinderella among the cinders, as usual, for she had got down the other side of the tree, and had taken back her beautiful clothes to the bird on the hazel bush, and had put on her old grey kirtle again.

On the third day, when the parents and the step-children had set off, Cinderella went again to her mother's grave, and said to the tree,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a dress, the like of which had never been seen for splendour and brilliancy, and slippers that were of gold. And when she appeared in this dress at the feast nobody knew what to say for wonderment. The prince danced with her alone, and if any one else asked her he answered, "She is my partner."

And when it was evening Cinderella wanted to go home, and the prince was about to go with her, when she ran past him so quickly that he could not follow her. But he had laid a plan, and had caused all the steps to be spread with pitch, so that as she rushed down them the left shoe of the maiden remained sticking in it. The prince picked it up, and saw that it was of gold, and very small and slender. The next morning he went to the father and told him that none should be his bride save the one whose foot the golden shoe should fit. Then the two sisters were very glad, because they had pretty feet. The eldest went to her room to try on the shoe, and her mother stood by. But she could not get her great toe into it, for the shoe was too small; then her mother handed her a knife, and said, "Cut the toe off, for when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut her toe off, squeezed her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince. Then he took her with him on his horse as his bride, and rode off. They had to pass by the grave, and there sat the two pigeons on the hazel bush, and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her shoe, and saw the blood flowing. And he turned his horse round and took the false bride home again, saying she was not the right one, and that the other sister must try on the shoe. So she went into her room to do so, and got her toes comfortably in, but her heel was too large. Then her mother handed her the knife, saying, "Cut a piece off your heel; when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut a piece off her heel, and thrust her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince, who took his bride before him on his horse and rode off. When they passed by the hazel bush the two pigeons sat there and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her foot, and saw how the blood was flowing from the shoe, and staining the white stocking. And he turned his horse round and brought the false bride home again. "This is not the right one," said he, "have you no other daughter?" - "No," said the man, "only my dead wife left behind her a little stunted Cinderella; it is impossible that she can be the bride." But the King's son ordered her to be sent for, but the mother said, "Oh no! she is much too dirty, I could not let her be seen." But he would have her fetched, and so Cinderella had to appear. First she washed her face and hands quite clean, and went in and curtseyed to the prince, who held out to her the golden shoe. Then she sat down on a stool, drew her foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and slipped it into the golden one, which fitted it perfectly. And when she stood up, and the prince looked in her face, he knew again the beautiful maiden that had danced with him, and he cried, "This is the right bride!" The step-mother and the two sisters were thunderstruck, and grew pale with anger; but he put Cinderella before him on his horse and rode off. And as they passed the hazel bush, the two white pigeons cried,

"There they go, there they go!
No blood on her shoe;
The shoe's not too small,
The right bride is she after all."

And when they had thus cried, they came flying after and perched on Cinderella's shoulders, one on the right, the other on the left, and so remained.

And when her wedding with the prince was appointed to be held the false sisters came, hoping to curry favour, and to take part in the festivities. So as the bridal procession went to the church, the eldest walked on the right side and the younger on the left, and the pigeons picked out an eye of each of them. And as they returned the elder was on the left side and the younger on the right, and the pigeons picked out the other eye of each of them. And so they were condemned to go blind for the rest of their days because of their wickedness and falsehood.
Ngày xưa có một người đàn ông giàu có, vợ ông ta ốm nặng. Khi bà cảm thấy mình sắp gần đất xa trời, bà gọi người con gái duy nhất của mình lại bên giường và dặn dò:
- Con yêu dấu của mẹ, con phải chăm chỉ nết na nhé, mẹ sẽ luôn luôn ở bên con, phù hộ cho con.
Nói xong bà nhắm mắt qua đời. Ngày ngày cô bé đến bên mộ mẹ ngồi khóc. Cô chăm chỉ, nết na ai cũng yêu mến. Mùa đông tới, tuyết phủ đầy trên mộ người mẹ nom như một tấm khăn trắng. Và khi ánh nắng trời xuân cuốn đi chiếc khăn tuyết ấy, người bố lấy vợ hai.
Người dì ghẻ mang theo hai người con gái riêng của mình. Hai đứa này mặt mày tuy sáng sủa, kháu khỉnh nhưng bụng dạ lại xấu xa đen tối. Từ đó trở đi, cô bé mồ côi sống một cuộc đời khốn khổ.
Dì ghẻ cùng hai con riêng hùa nhau nói:
- Không thể để con ngan ngu ngốc kia ngồi lỳ trong nhà mãi thế được! Muốn ăn bánh phải kiếm lấy mà ăn. Ra ngay, con làm bếp!
Chúng lột sạch quần áo đẹp của cô, mặc vào cho cô bé một chiếc áo choàng cũ kỹ màu xám và đưa cho cô một đôi guốc mộc.
- Hãy nhìn cô công chúa đài các thay hình đổi dạng kìa!
Cả ba mẹ con reo lên nhạo báng và dẫn cô xuống bếp. Cô phải làm lụng vất vả từ sáng đến tối, tờ mờ sáng đã phải dậy, nào là đi lấy nước, nhóm bếp, thổi cơm, giặt giũ. Thế chưa đủ, hai đứa con dì ghẻ còn nghĩ mọi cách để hành hạ cô, hành hạ chán chúng chế giễu rồi đổ đậu Hà Lan lẫn với đậu biển xuống tro bắt cô ngồi nhặt riêng ra. Đến tối, sau một ngày làm lụng vất vả đã mệt lử, cô cũng không được nằm giường, mà phải nằm ngủ ngay trên đống tro cạnh bếp. Và vì lúc nào cô cũng ở bên tro bụi nên nom lem luốc, hai đứa con dì ghẻ gọi cô là "Lo Lem."
Có lần đi chợ phiên, người cha hỏi hai con dì ghẻ muốn mua quà gì. Đứa thứ nhất nói:
- Quần áo đẹp.
Đứa thứ hai nói:
- Ngọc và đá quý.
Cha lại hỏi:
- Còn con, Lọ Lem, con muốn cái gì nào?
- Thưa cha, trên đường về, cành cây nào va vào mũ cha thì cha bẻ cho con.
Người cha mua về cho hai con dì ghẻ quần áo đẹp, ngọc trai và đá quý. Trên đường về, khi ông cưỡi ngựa đi qua một bụi cây xanh, có cành cây dẻ va vào người ông và làm lật mũ rơi xuống đất. Ông bẻ cành ấy mang về. Về tới nhà, ông chia quà cho hai con dì ghẻ những thứ chúng xin và đưa cho Lọ Lem cành hạt dẻ. Lọ Lem cám ơn cha, đến bên mộ mẹ, trồng cành dẻ bên mộ và ngồi khóc thảm thiết, nước mắt chảy xuống tưới ướt cành cây mới trồng. Cành nảy rễ, đâm chồi và chẳng bao lâu sau đã thành một cây cao to. Ngày nào Lọ Lem cũng ra viếng mộ mẹ ba lần, ngồi khóc khấn mẹ, và lần nào cũng có một con chim trắng bay tới đậu trên cành cây. Hễ Lọ Lem ngỏ ý mong ước xin gì thì chim liền thả những thứ ấy xuống cho cô.
Một hôm nhà vua mở hội ba ngày liền, và cho mời tất cả các hoa khôi trong nước tới dự để hoàng tử kén vợ.
Hai đứa con dì ghẻ nghe nói là mình cũng được mời tới dự thì mừng mừng rỡ rỡ, gọi Lọ Lem đến bảo:
- Mau chải đầu, đánh giày cho chúng tao, buộc dây giày cho chặt để chúng tao đi dự hội ở cung vua.
Lọ Lem làm xong những việc đó rồi ngồi khóc, vì cô cũng muốn đi nhảy. Cô xin dì ghẻ cho đi. Dì ghẻ nói:
- Đồ Lọ Lem, người toàn bụi với bẩn mà cũng đòi đi dự hội! Giày, quần áo không có mà cũng đòi đi nhảy.
Lọ Lem khẩn khoản xin thì dì ghẻ nói:
- Tao mới đổ một đấu đậu biển lẫn với tro, nếu mày nhặt trong hai tiếng đồng hồ mà xong thì cho mày đi.
Cô bé đi qua cửa sau, ra vườn gọi:
- Hỡi chim câu hiền lành, hỡi chim gáy, hỡi tất cả các chim trên trời, hãy bay lại đây nhặt giúp em:
Đậu ngon thì bỏ vào niêu,
Đậu xấu thì bỏ vào diều chim ơi.
Lập tức có đôi chim bồ câu trắng bay qua cửa sổ bếp sà xuống, tiếp theo là chim gáy, rồi tất cả chim trên trời đều sà xuống quanh đống tro. Chim câu gù gù rồi bắt đầu mổ lia lịa píc, píc, píc, nhặt những hạt tốt bỏ vào nồi. Chưa đầy một tiếng đồng hồ chim đã nhặt xong. Làm xong chim lại cất cánh bay đi. Cô gái mang đậu cho dì ghẻ, bụng mừng thầm tin rằng thế nào mình cũng được phép đi dự dạ hội.
Nhưng dì ghẻ bảo:
- Không được đi đâu cả. Lọ Lem! Mày làm gì có quần áo nhảy mà đi nhảy, người ta sẽ nhạo báng mày cho coi.
Khi thấy cô gái khóc, dì ghẻ bảo:
- Nếu mày nhặt hai đấu đậu biển khỏi tro trong một tiếng đồng hồ thì cho phép mày đi cùng.
Khi đó dì ghẻ nghĩ:
- Chắc chắn chẳng bao giờ nó nhặt xong.
Sau khi dì ghẻ đổ đậu lẫn trong đống tro, cô gái đi qua cửa sau ra vườn và lại gọi:
- Hỡi chim câu hiền lành, hỡi chim gáy, hỡi tất cả các chim trên trời, hãy bay lại đây nhặt giúp em:
Đậu ngon thì bỏ vào niêu,
Đậu xấu thì bỏ vào diều chim đi.
Lập tức có chim bồ câu trắng bay qua cửa sổ bếp sà xuống, tiếp theo là chim gáy, rồi tất cả chim trên trời đều sà xuống quanh đống tro. Chim câu gù gù rồi bắt đầu mổ lia lịa píc, píc, píc; rồi những chim khác cũng thay nhau mổ píc, píc, píc nhặt những hạt tốt bỏ vào nồi. Chưa đầy nửa tiếng đồng hồ chim đã nhặt xong và cất cánh bay đi. Rồi cô gái mang đậu cho dì ghẻ xem, bụng mừng thầm tin rằng lần này thế nào mình cũng được phép đi dự dạ hội. Nhưng dì ghẻ bảo:
- Tốn công vô ích con ạ! Mày không đi cùng được đâu, vì mày làm gì có quần áo nhảy mà đi nhảy. Chả nhẽ bắt chúng tao bẽ mặt vì mày hay sao?
Nói rồi mụ quay lưng, cùng hai đứa con kiêu ngạo vội vã ra đi.
Khi không còn một ai ở nhà, Lọ Lem ra mộ mẹ, đứng dưới gốc cây dẻ gọi:
Cây ơi, cây hãy rung đi,
Thả xuống áo bạc áo vàng cho em.
Chim thả xuống cho cô một bộ quần áo thêu vàng, thêu bạc và một đôi hài lụa thêu chỉ bạc. Cô vội mặc quần áo vào đi dự hội. Dì ghẻ và hai con gái không nhận được ra cô, cứ tưởng đó là nàng công chúa ở một nước xa lạ nào tới, vì cô mặc áo vàng trông đẹp quá. Mấy mẹ con không ngờ đó lại là Lọ Lem, đinh ninh là cô đang ở nhà và giờ này đang lúi húi nhặt đậu khỏi tro. Hoàng tử đi lại phía cô, cầm tay cô nhảy. Hoàng tử không muốn nhảy với ai nữa nên không chịu rời tay cô ra. Nếu có ai đến mời cô nhảy thì chàng nói:
- Đây là vũ nữ của tôi!
Đến tối cô muốn về nhà thì hoàng tử nói:
- Để tôi đi cùng, tôi muốn đưa cô về.
Chàng rất muốn biết cô thiếu nữ xinh đẹp này là con cái nhà ai. Gần đến nhà, cô gỡ tay hoàng tử ra và nhảy lên chuồng chim bồ câu. Hoàng tử chờ đợi mãi, khi người cha đến chàng kể với ông về việc cô gái lạ mặt đã nhảy vào chuồng bồ câu. Ông cụ nghĩ:
- Phải chăng đó là Lọ Lem?
Rồi cụ lấy rìu và câu liêm chẻ đôi chuồng bồ câu ra. Nhưng chẳng có ai ở trong đó cả. Khi họ về tới thì thấy Lọ Lem mặc quần áo nhem nhuốc đang nằm trên đống tro, bên ống khói lò sưởi có một ngọn đèn dầu cháy tù mù. Thì ra Lọ Lem đã nhảy nhanh như cắt từ chuồng bồ câu xuống, chạy lại phía cây dẻ cởi quần áo đẹp đẽ ra để trên mộ. Chim sà xuống tha những thứ đó đi. Rồi cô lại mặc chiếc áo choàng màu xám vào, nằm trên đống tro trong bếp như cũ.
Hôm sau, hội lại mở. Khi cha mẹ và hai em đi rồi. Lọ Lem lại đến gốc cây dẻ gọi:
Cây ơi, cây hãy rung đi,
Thả xuống áo bạc, áo vàng cho em.
Chim lại thả xuống cho em một bộ quần áo lộng lẫy hơn hôm trước. Cô mặc bộ quần áo ấy đi. Khi cô xuất hiện trong buổi dạ hội, cô đẹp rực rỡ làm mọi người ngẩn người ra ngắm. Hoàng tử đã đợi cô từ lâu liền cầm tay cô và chỉ nhảy với một mình cô thôi. Các người khác đến mời cô nhảy thì hoàng tử nói:
- Đây là vũ nữ của tôi!
Đến tối, cô xin về, hoàng tử đi theo xem nhà cô ở đâu. Đến nơi, cô vội lên hoàng tử chạy ra vườn sau nhà. Ở đó có một cây lê quả sai chi chít nom thật ngon lành. Cô trèo nhanh như sóc lẩn giữa các cành. Hoàng tử không biết cô trốn ở đâu, chàng đợi khi người cha đến thì nói:
- Cô gái lạ mặt đã chạy trốn. Ta đoán, có lẽ cô ấy nhảy lên cây lê rồi.
Người cha nghĩ:
- Phải chăng đó là Lọ Lem?
Ông cho mang rìu đến, đẵn cây xuống, nhưng chẳng thấy có ai trên cây. Khi cả nhà vào bếp thì thấy Lọ Lem nằm trên đống tro như mọi ngày. Thì ra cô đã nhảy từ phía bên kia cây xuống, đem trả quần áo đẹp cho chim trên cây dẻ và mặc chiếc áo choàng màu xám vào.
Đến ngày thứ ba, cha mẹ và các em vừa đi khỏi, Lọ Lem lại ra mộ mẹ và nói với cây:
Cây ơi, cây hãy rung đi,
Thả xuống áo bạc, áo vàng cho em.
Chim liền thả xuống một bộ quần áo đẹp chưa từng có và một đôi hài toàn bằng vàng. Với bộ quần áo ấy cô đến dạ hội, mọi người hết sức ngạc nhiên há hốc mồm ra nhìn. Hoàng tử chỉ nhảy với cô, có ai mời cô nhảy thì chàng nói:
- Đây là vũ nữ của tôi!
Khi trời tối, Lọ Lem muốn về. Hoàng tử định đưa về nhưng cô lẩn nhanh như chạch làm hoàng tử không theo kịp. Hoàng tử nghĩ ra một kế, chàng cho đổ nhựa thông lên thang, vì thế khi cô nhảy lên thang, chiếc giày bên trái bị dính lại. Hoàng tử cầm lên ngắm thì thấy chiếc hài nhỏ nhắn, xinh đẹp toàn bằng vàng.
Hôm sau hoàng tử mang hài đến tìm người cha và bảo:
- Ta chỉ lấy người đó làm vợ, người chân đi vừa chiếc hài này.
Hai cô con gái dì ghẻ mừng lắm, vì hai cô đều có đôi bàn chân đẹp. Cô cả mang giày vào buồng thử trước mặt mẹ. Nhưng cô không đút ngón chân cái vào được vì hài nhỏ quá.
Bà mẹ liền đưa cho cô một con dao và bảo:
- Cứ chặt phăng ngón cái đi. Khi con đã là hoàng hậu rồi thì cần gì phải đi bộ nữa.
Cô ta liền chặt đứt ngón chân cái, cố nhét chân vào hài rồi cắn răng chịu đau đến ra mắt hoàng tử. Hoàng tử nhận cô làm cô dâu và bế cô lên ngựa cùng về. Dọc đường, hai người phải đi qua mộ, có đôi chim câu đậu trên cây dẻ hót lên:
Rúc-di-cúc, rúc-di-cúc.
Máu thấm trên hài,
Do chân dài quá,
Chính cô dâu thật,
Vẫn ở trong nhà.
Hoàng tử liếc nhìn xuống chân cô thấy máu vẫn còn đang chảy ra, chàng liền quay ngựa lại, đưa cô dâu giả về nhà trả lại cho cha mẹ cô và nói:
- Đây không phải là cô dâu thật.
Rồi chàng đưa hài cho cô em thử. Cô em vào buồng thử hài thì may sao các ngón đều lọt cả, nhưng phải cái gót lại to quá. Bà mẹ đưa cô một con dao và bảo:
- Cứ chặt phăng đi một miếng gót chân. Khi con đã là hoàng hậu thì chẳng bao giờ phải đi chân đất nữa.
Cô ta chặt một miếng gót chân, cô đút chân vào hài, cắn răng chịu đau, ra gặp hoàng tử.
Hoàng tử nhận cô làm cô dâu và bế cô lên ngựa cùng về. Dọc đường, hai người phải đi qua mộ, có đôi chim câu đậu trên cây dẻ hót lên:
Rúc-di-cúc, rúc-di-cúc.
Máu thấm trên hài,
Do chân dài quá,
Chính cô dâu thật,
Vẫn ở trong nhà.
Hoàng tử nhìn xuống chân cô thấy máu vẫn còn đang chảy ra, chàng liền quay ngựa lại, đưa cô dâu giả về nhà trả lại cho cha mẹ cô và nói:
- Đây cũng không phải là cô dâu thật. Gia đình còn có con gái nào khác không?
Người cha đáp:
- Thưa hoàng tử không ạ. Người vợ cả của tôi khi qua đời có để lại một đứa con gái người xanh xao, nhem nhuốc. Thứ nó thì chả làm cô dâu được.
Hoàng tử bảo ông cứ gọi cô gái ấy ra. Dì ghẻ nói chen vào:
- Thưa hoàng tử, không thể thế được. Nó dơ bẩn lắm không thể cho nó ra mắt hoàng tử được.
Hoàng tử khăng khăng nhất định đòi gọi Lọ Lem lên kỳ được. Cô rửa mặt mũi tay chân, đến cúi chào hoàng tử. Hoàng tử đưa cho cô chiếc hài vàng. Cô ngồi lên ghế đẩu, rút bàn chân ra khỏi chiếc guốc nặng chình chịch, cho chân vào chiếc hài thì vừa như in. Khi cô đứng dậy, hoàng tử nhìn thấy mặt nhận ngay ra cô gái xinh đẹp đã nhảy với mình bèn reo lên:
- Cô dâu thật đây rồi!
Dì ghẻ và hai cô con gái mặt tái đi vì hoảng sợ và tức giận. Hoàng tử bế Lọ Lem lên ngựa đi. Khi hai người cưỡi ngựa qua cây dẻ, đôi chim câu hót:
Rúc-di-cúc, rúc-di-cúc
Hài không có máu,
Chân vừa như in,
Đúng cô dâu thật,
Hoàng tử dẫn về.
Hót xong, đôi chim câu bay tới đậu trên hai vai Lọ Lem, con đậu bên trái, con đậu bên phải.
Khi đám cưới của hoàng tử được tổ chức thì hai cô chị cũng đến phỉnh nịnh để mong hưởng phú quý. Lúc đoàn đón dâu đến thì cô chị cả đi bên phải, cô em đi bên trái. Chim câu mổ mỗi cô mất một mắt. Sau đó khi họ trở về thì cô chị đi bên trái, cô em đi bên phải, chim câu lại mổ mỗi cô mất một mắt nữa. Cả hai chị em suốt đời mù lòa, vì bị trừng phạt do tội ác và giả dối.

Dịch: Lương Văn Hồng, © Lương Văn Hồng




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.