ENGLISH

Clever Else

日本語

知恵者エルゼ


There was once a man who had a daughter who was called Clever Else, and when she was grown up, her father said she must be married, and her mother said, "Yes, if we could only find some one that would consent to have." At last one came from a distance, and his name was Hans, and when he proposed to her, he made it a condition that Clever Else should be very careful as well. "Oh," said the father, "she does not want for brains." - "No, indeed," said the mother, "she can see the wind coming up the street and hear the flies cough." - "Well," said Hans, "if she does not turn out to be careful too, I will not have her." Now when they were all seated at table, and had well eaten, the mother said, "Else, go into the cellar and draw some beer." Then Clever Else took down the jug from the hook in the wall, and as she was on her way to the cellar she rattled the lid up and down so as to pass away the time. When she got there, she took a stool and stood it in front of the cask, so that she need not stoop and make her back ache with needless trouble. Then she put the jug under the tap and turned it, and while the beer was running, in order that her eyes should not be idle, she glanced hither and thither, and finally caught sight of a pickaxe that the workmen had left sticking in the ceiling just above her head. Then Clever Else began to cry, for she thought, "If I marry Hans, and we have a child, and it grows big, and we send it into the cellar to draw beer, that pickaxe might fall on his head and kill him." So there she sat and cried with all her might, lamenting the anticipated misfortune. All the while they were waiting upstairs for something to drink, and they waited in vain. At last the mistress said to the maid, "Go down to the cellar and see why Else does not come." So the maid went, and found her sitting in front of the cask crying with all her might. "What are you crying for?" said the maid. "Oh dear me," answered she, "how can I help crying? if I marry Hans, and we have a child, and it grows big, and we send it here to draw beer, perhaps the pickaxe may fall on its head and kill it." - "Our Else is clever indeed!" said the maid, and directly sat down to bewail the anticipated misfortune. After a while, when the people upstairs found that the maid did not return, and they were becoming more and more thirsty, the master said to the boy, "You go down into the cellar, and see what Else and the maid are doing." The boy did so, and there he found both Clever Else and the maid sitting crying together. Then he asked what was the matter. "Oh dear me," said Else, "how can we help crying? If I marry Hans, and we have a child, and it grows big, and we send it here to draw beer, the pickaxe might fall on its head and kill it." - "Our Else is clever indeed!" said the boy, and sitting down beside her, he began howling with a good will. Upstairs they were all waiting for him to come back, but as he did not come, the master said to the mistress, "You go down to the cellar and see what Else is doing." So the mistress went down and found all three in great lamentations, and when she asked the cause, then Else told her how the future possible child might be killed as soon as it was big enough to be sent to draw beer, by the pickaxe falling on it. Then the mother at once exclaimed, "Our Else is clever indeed!" and, sitting down, she wept with the rest. Upstairs the husband waited a little while, but as his wife did not return, and as his thirst constantly increased, he said, "I must go down to the cellar myself, and see what has become of Else." And when he came into the cellar, and found them all sitting and weeping together, he was told that it was all owing to the child that Else might possibly have, and the possibility of its being killed by the pickaxe so happening to fall just at the time the child might be sitting underneath it drawing beer; and when he heard all this, he cried, "How clever is our Else!" and sitting down, he joined his tears to theirs. The intended bridegroom stayed upstairs by himself a long time, but as nobody came back to him, he thought he would go himself and see what they were all about And there he found all five lamenting and crying most pitifully, each one louder than the other. "What misfortune has happened?" cried he. "O my dear Hans," said Else, "if we marry and have a child, and it grows big, and we send it down here to draw beer, perhaps that pickaxe which has been left sticking up there might fall down on the child's head and kill it; and how can we help crying at that!" - "Now," said Hans, "I cannot think that greater sense than that could be wanted in my household; so as you are so clever, Else, I will have you for my wife," and taking her by the hand he led her upstairs, and they had the wedding at once.

A little while after they were married, Hans said to his wife, "I am going out to work, in order to get money; you go into the field and cut the corn, so that we may have bread." - "Very well, I will do so, dear Hans," said she. And after Hans was gone she cooked herself some nice stew, and took it with her into the field. And when she got there, she said to herself, "Now, what shall I do? shall I reap first, or eat first? All right, I will eat first." Then she ate her fill of stew, and when she could eat no more, she said to herself, "Now, what shall I do? shall I reap first, or sleep first? All right, I will sleep first." Then she lay down in the corn and went to sleep. And Hans got home, and waited there a long while, and Else did not come, so he said to himself, "My clever Else is so industrious that she never thinks of coming home and eating." But when evening drew near and still she did not come, Hans set out to see how much corn she had cut; but she had cut no corn at all, but there she was lying in it asleep. Then Hans made haste home, and fetched a bird-net with little bells and threw it over her; and still she went on sleeping. And he ran home again and locked himself in, and sat him down on his bench to work. At last, when it was beginning to grow dark, Clever Else woke, and when she got up and shook herself, the bells jingled at each movement that she made. Then she grew frightened, and began to doubt whether she were really Clever Else or not, and said to herself, "Am I, or am I not?" And, not knowing what answer to make, she stood for a long while considering; at last she thought, "I will go home to Hans and ask him if I am I or not; he is sure to know." So she ran up to the door of her house, but it was locked; then she knocked at the window, and cried, "Hans, is Else within?" - "Yes," answered Hans, "she is in." Then she was in a greater fright than ever, and crying, "Oh dear, then I am not I," she went to inquire at another door, but the people hearing the jingling of the bells would not open to her, and she could get in nowhere. So she ran away beyond the village, and since then no one has seen her.
昔、"賢いエルシー"と呼ばれた娘がいる男がいました。娘が大人になったとき、父親が「娘を結婚させよう」と言い、母親は「ええ、もらってくれるだれか来てくれるといいんですが」といいました。とうとう一人の男が遠くからやってきて、妻にほしいと申し込みましたが、男はハンスと言い、賢いエルシーが本当に頭がよくなければいけないという条件をつけました。「ああ」と父親は言いました。「娘にはたくさん分別がありますよ。」そして母親は、「まあ、あの子は風が通りを吹いてくるのが見えるし、ハエが咳き込んでいるのがきこえますよ。」と言いました。

「なるほど」とハンスは言いました。「もし本当に頭がよくなければ、もらいませんよ。」みんなが夕食の席について食べ終わったとき、母親が、「エルシー、地下室へ行ってビールをとっておいで」と言いました。すると、賢いエルシーは壁からジョッキをとり、地下室へ入って、退屈しのぎにふたをパパパッとたたきながら歩いていきました。下に下りると、椅子をもってきて、かがんで腰が痛くなったり思わぬ怪我をしないために、樽の前に置きました。それから自分の前にジョッキを置き、樽の栓を回しました。ビールが樽から出ている間、エルシーは目を遊ばせておかないで壁を見上げました。あちらこちら眺めまわした後、ちょうど自分の頭の上に、職人がうっかり置き忘れたつるはしが見えました。

すると賢いエルシーは泣きだして、「ハンスと結婚して、子供が生まれ、その子が大きくなって、ここの地下室へビールをとりに行かせる、するとあのつるはしが子供の頭に落ちて、子供は死ぬわ。」と言いました。それから、目前にある災難を嘆いて、座ったままわんわん泣き叫びました。

上にいる人たちは飲み物を待っていましたが賢いエルシーはまだ来ませんでした。それで母親が女中に、「ちょっと地下室へ下りて行ってエルシーがどこにいるか見ておくれ。」と言いました。女中が行ってみるとエルシーは樽の前に座り大声で泣き叫んでいました。「エルシー、どうして泣いてるの?」と女中は聞きました。「ああ」とエルシーは答えました。「泣かないでいられないわ。ハンスと結婚して、子供が生まれ、その子が大きくなって、ここでビールをとる、たぶんあのつるはしが子供の頭に落ちて、子供は死ぬわ。」すると女中は「なんて賢いエルシーでしょう。」と言って、エルシーのそばに座り、その災難を嘆いて大声で泣き始めました。しばらくして、女中が戻ってこないので、上の人たちはビールが早く欲しくて、父親が下男に「地下室に下りていって、エルシーと女中がどこにいるか見てきてくれ。」と言いました。

下男が下りて行くと、賢いエルシーと女中の二人とも座って一緒に泣いていました。それで下男は聞きました。「どうして泣いているんだい?」「ああ」とエルシーは答えました。「泣かないでいられないわ。ハンスと結婚して、子供が生まれ、その子が大きくなって、ここでビールをとる、あのつるはしが子供の頭に落ちて、子供は死ぬわ。」すると下男は「なんて賢いエルシーなんだろう。」と言って、エルシーのそばに座り、これも大声で泣き始めました。上では下男を待ちましたがまだ戻って来なかったので、父親は母親に、「地下室へ下りて行ってエルシーがどこにいるか見てきてくれ。」と言いました。

母親が下りて行くと、三人とも大泣きの真っ最中だったので、どうしたのか尋ねました。するとエルシーは母親にもまた、将来生まれてくる子供が、大きくなってビールを汲むことになりつるはしが落ちて死ぬだろう、と話しました。すると母親もまた「なんて賢いエルシーなんでしょう。」と言って、座り、一緒に泣きました。

上にいる父親は少し待っていましたが、妻が戻らなくてますます喉が渇いてきたので、「おれが自分で地下室へ入ってエルシーがどこにいるか見るしかないな」と言いました。しかし、地下室に入るとみんな一緒に座って泣いていたので、理由をきいて、エルシーの子供が理由だ、エルシーがたぶんいつか子供を生み、その子がつるはしが落ちるときたまたまその下にいてビールを汲んでいれば、つるはしに殺されてしまう、と聞くと、父親は「ああ、なんて賢いエルシーだ」と叫び、座って、これもまたみんなと一緒に泣きました。

花婿は長い間一人で上にいましたが、誰も戻って来ないので、「きっと下で僕をまっているんだ。僕もそこに行ってみんなどうしているか見て来なくては」と思いました。花婿が下りて行くと、五人みんなが座ってとても悲しそうに、どの人も他に負けないくらい大声で泣き叫んでいました。「どんな不幸があったんですか?」と花婿は尋ねました。エルシーは「ああ、ハンスさん、私たちが結婚し、子供が生まれ、大きくなって、たぶんここへ飲み物をとりにやらせ、するとあそこの上に置き忘れているつるはしがひょっとして落ちてこどもの頭を打ち砕くでしょう。泣かずにいられませんわ。」と言いました。「それじゃあ」とハンスは言いました。「これでうちの所帯には十分だとわかったよ。あんたはそんなに賢いエルシーだから、嫁にもらおう。」ハンスはエルシーの手をとり、一緒に上へ連れて行き、結婚しました。

結婚した後しばらくしてハンスは「エルシー、おれは働きに出て、おれたちの金を稼いでくるよ。パンが食べれるように、畑へ行って麦を刈ってくれ。」と言いました。「いいわよ、あなた、やっとくわ。」ハンスが行ってしまうと、エルシーはおいしいおかゆを作り、それを畑へ持って行きました。畑へ着くと、心の中で「どうしようか、先に麦を刈ろうか、先に食べようか、うん、先に食べようっと。」とかんがえました。それからおかゆを食べ、お腹がいっぱいになると、もう一度、「どうしようか、先に麦を刈ろうか、先に眠ろうか、先に眠ることにするわ。」と言いました。それから麦の間に寝転がり、眠りました。

ハンスはもうとっくに家に帰っていましたが、エルシーがこなかったので、「なんて賢いエルシーを嫁にしたんだろう。とても一生懸命働いて飯を食いに帰ってもこないや。」と言いました。しかし、夕方になってもまだ帰って来ないので、ハンスはエルシーがどれだけ刈ったか見に出かけていきました。しかし、何も刈られていなくてエルシーは麦の間で眠りこけていました。

するとハンスは急いで家に帰り、小さな鈴がたくさんついている鳥網をもっていき、エルシーのまわりに吊るしました。エルシーはそれでも眠り続けました。それからハンスは走って家に帰り、戸締りをして、椅子に腰かけて仕事をしました。とうとう、真っ暗になってから賢いエルシーは目を覚まし、起きあがると自分のまわりでチリンチリンと鈴の音が聞こえ、一歩歩くたびに鳴りました。するとエルシーは驚いて、自分が本当に賢いエルシーなのかわからなくなり、「私なの?私じゃないの?」と言いました。しかし、これに何と答えるかわからなくて、しばらく考えて立っていましたが、とうとう、「家へ帰って私か私じゃないかきいてみよう。きっとみんなは知ってるわ。」と思いました。エルシーは走って自分の家の戸口へ行きましたが閉まっていました。それで窓をたたいて、「ハンス、エルシーは中にいるの?」と叫びました。「ああ、中にいるよ。」とハンスは答えました。これをきいてエルシーはぎょっとして、「ああ、どうしよう、じゃあ私じゃないんだわ」と言いました。それから別の家に行きましたが、鈴がチリンチリン鳴る音を聞くと戸を開けようとしませんでした。それでエルシーはどこにも入れませんでした。それからエルシーは村から走って出て行き、そのあとは誰もエルシーを見た人はいません。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.