ENGLISH

Tom Thumb

日本語

おやゆびこぞう


There was once a poor countryman who used to sit in the chimney-corner all evening and poke the fire, while his wife sat at her spinning-wheel. And he used to say, "How dull it is without any children about us; our house is so quiet, and other people's houses so noisy and merry!" - "Yes," answered his wife, and sighed, "if we could only have one, and that one ever so little, no bigger than my thumb, how happy I should be! It would, indeed, be having our heart's desire." Now, it happened that after a while the woman had a child who was perfect in all his limbs, but no bigger than a thumb. Then the parents said, "He is just what we wished for, and we will love him very much," and they named him according to his stature, "Tom Thumb." And though they gave him plenty of nourishment, he grew no bigger, but remained exactly the same size as when he was first born; and he had very good faculties, and was very quick and prudent, so that all he did prospered.

One day his father made ready to go into the forest to cut wood, and he said, as if to himself, "Now, I wish there was some one to bring the cart to meet me." - "O father," cried Tom Thumb, "I can bring the cart, let me alone for that, and in proper time, too!" Then the father laughed, and said, "How will you manage that? You are much too little to hold the reins." - "That has nothing to do with it, father; while my mother goes on with her spinning I will sit in the horse's ear and tell him where to go." - "Well," answered the father, "we will try it for once." When it was time to set off, the mother went on spinning, after setting Tom Thumb in the horse's ear; and so he drove off, crying, "Gee-up, gee-wo!" So the horse went on quite as if his master were driving him, and drew the waggon along the right road to the wood. Now it happened just as they turned a corner, and the little fellow was calling out "Gee-up!" that two strange men passed by. "Look," said one of them, "how is this? There goes a waggon, and the driver is calling to the horse, and yet he is nowhere to be seen." - "It is very strange," said the other; "we will follow the waggon, and see where it belongs." And the wagon went right through the wood, up to the place where the wood had been hewed. When Tom Thumb caught sight of his father, he cried out, "Look, father, here am I with the wagon; now, take me down." The father held the horse with his left hand, and with the right he lifted down his little son out of the horse's ear, and Tom Thumb sat down on a stump, quite happy and content. When the two strangers saw him they were struck dumb with wonder. At last one of them, taking the other aside, said to him, "Look here, the little chap would make our fortune if we were to show him in the town for money. Suppose we buy him." So they went up to the woodcutter, and said, "Sell the little man to us; we will take care he shall come to no harm." - "No," answered the father; "he is the apple of my eye, and not for all the money in the world would I sell him." But Tom Thumb, when he heard what was going on, climbed up by his father's coat tails, and, perching himself on his shoulder, he whispered in his ear, "Father, you might as well let me go. I will soon come back again." Then the father gave him up to the two men for a large piece of money. They asked him where he would like to sit, "Oh, put me on the brim of your hat," said he. "There I can walk about and view the country, and be in no danger of falling off." So they did as he wished, and when Tom Thumb had taken leave of his father, they set off all together. And they travelled on until it grew dusk, and the little fellow asked to be set down a little while for a change, and after some difficulty they consented. So the man took him down from his hat, and set him in a field by the roadside, and he ran away directly, and, after creeping about among the furrows, he slipped suddenly into a mouse-hole, just what he was looking for. "Good evening, my masters, you can go home without me!"cried he to them, laughing. They ran up and felt about with their sticks in the mouse-hole, but in vain. Tom Thumb crept farther and farther in, and as it was growing dark, they had to make the best of their way home, full of vexation, and with empty purses.

When Tom Thumb found they were gone, he crept out of his hiding-place underground. "It is dangerous work groping about these holes in the darkness," said he; "I might easily break my neck." But by good fortune he came upon an empty snail shell. "That's all right," said he. "Now I can get safely through the night;" and he settled himself down in it. Before he had time to get to sleep, he heard two men pass by, and one was saying to the other, "How can we manage to get hold of the rich parson's gold and silver?" - "I can tell you how," cried Tom Thumb. "How is this?" said one of the thieves, quite frightened, "I hear some one speak!" So they stood still and listened, and Tom Thumb spoke again. "Take me with you; I will show you how to do it!" - "Where are you, then?" asked they. "Look about on the ground and notice where the voice comes from," answered he. At last they found him, and lifted him up. "You little elf," said they, "how can you help us?" - "Look here," answered he, "I can easily creep between the iron bars of the parson's room and hand out to you whatever you would like to have." - "Very well," said they, ff we will try what you can do." So when they came to the parsonage-house, Tom Thumb crept into the room, but cried out with all his might, "Will you have all that is here?" So the thieves were terrified, and said, "Do speak more softly, lest any one should be awaked." But Tom Thumb made as if he did not hear them, and cried out again, "What would you like? will you have all that is here?" so that the cook, who was sleeping in a room hard by, heard it, and raised herself in bed and listened. The thieves, however, in their fear of being discovered, had run back part of the way, but they took courage again, thinking that it was only a jest of the little fellow's. So they came back and whispered to him to be serious, and to hand them out something. Then Tom Thumb called out once more as loud as he could, "Oh yes, I will give it all to you, only put out your hands." Then the listening maid heard him distinctly that time, and jumped out of bed, and burst open the door. The thieves ran off as if the wild huntsman were behind them; but the maid, as she could see nothing, went to fetch a light. And when she came back with one, Tom Thumb had taken himself off, without being seen by her, into the barn; and the maid, when she had looked in every hole and corner and found nothing, went back to bed at last, and thought that she must have been dreaming with her eyes and ears open.

So Tom Thumb crept among the hay, and found a comfortable nook to sleep in, where he intended to remain until it was day, and then to go home to his father and mother. But other things were to befall him; indeed, there is nothing but trouble and worry in this world! The maid got up at dawn of day to feed the cows. The first place she went to was the barn, where she took up an armful of hay, and it happened to be the very heap in which Tom Thumb lay asleep. And he was so fast asleep, that he was aware of nothing, and never waked until he was in the mouth of the cow, who had taken him up with the hay. "Oh dear," cried he, "how is it that I have got into a mill!" but he soon found out where he was, and he had to be very careful not to get between the cow's teeth, and at last he had to descend into the cow's stomach. "The windows were forgotten when this little room was built," said he, "and the sunshine cannot get in; there is no light to be had." His quarters were in every way unpleasant to him, and, what was the worst, new hay was constantly coming in, and the space was being filled up. At last he cried out in his extremity, as loud as he could, "No more hay for me! no more hay for me!" The maid was then milking the cow, and as she heard a voice, but could see no one, and as it was the same voice that she had heard in the night, she was so frightened that she fell off her stool, and spilt the milk. Then she ran in great haste to her master, crying, "Oh, master dear, the cow spoke!" - "You must be crazy," answered her master, and he went himself to the cow-house to see what was the matter. No sooner had he put his foot inside the door, than Tom Thumb cried out again, "No more hay for me! no more hay for me!" Then the parson himself was frightened, supposing that a bad spirit had entered into the cow, and he ordered her to be put to death. So she was killed, but the stomach, where Tom Thumb was lying, was thrown upon a dunghill. Tom Thumb had great trouble to work his way out of it, and he had just made a space big enough for his head to go through, when a new misfortune happened. A hungry wolf ran up and swallowed the whole stomach at one gulp. But Tom Thumb did not lose courage. "Perhaps," thought he, "the wolf will listen to reason," and he cried out from the inside of the wolf," My dear wolf, I can tell you where to get a splendid meal!" - "Where is it to be had?" asked the wolf. "In such and such a house, and you must creep into it through the drain, and there you will find cakes and bacon and broth, as much as you can eat," and he described to him his father's house. The wolf needed not to be told twice. He squeezed himself through the drain in the night, and feasted in the store-room to his heart's content. When, at last, he was satisfied, he wanted to go away again, but he had become so big, that to creep the same way back was impossible. This Tom Thumb had reckoned upon, and began to make a terrible din inside the wolf, crying and calling as loud as he could. "Will you be quiet?" said the wolf; "you will wake the folks up!" - "Look here," cried the little man, "you are very well satisfied, and now I will do something for my own enjoyment," and began again to make all the noise he could. At last the father and mother were awakened, and they ran to the room-door and peeped through the chink, and when they saw a wolf in occupation, they ran and fetched weapons - the man an axe, and the wife a scythe. "Stay behind," said the man, as they entered the room; "when I have given him a blow, and it does not seem to have killed him, then you must cut at him with your scythe." Then Tom Thumb heard his father's voice, and cried, "Dear father; I am here in the wolfs inside." Then the father called out full of joy, "Thank heaven that we have found our dear child!" and told his wife to keep the scythe out of the way, lest Tom Thumb should be hurt with it. Then he drew near and struck the wolf such a blow on the head that he fell down dead; and then" he fetched a knife and a pair of scissors, slit up the wolf's body, and let out the little fellow. "Oh, what anxiety we have felt about you!" said the father. "Yes, father, I have seen a good deal of the world, and I am very glad to breathe fresh air again." - "And where have you been all this time?" asked his father. "Oh, I have been in a mouse-hole and a snail's shell, in a cow's stomach and a wolfs inside: now, I think, I will stay at home." - "And we will not part with you for all the kingdoms of the world," cried the parents, as they kissed and hugged their dear little Tom Thumb. And they gave him something to eat and drink, and a new suit of clothes, as his old ones were soiled with travel.
昔、貧しいお百姓がいました。夜にお百姓がかまどのそばに座って火をかきおこし、おかみさんは座って糸を紡いでいました。その時、お百姓は、「子供がいないのはわびしいなあ。おれんちではとても静かで、よそんちでは賑やかでわいわいしてるもんなあ。」と言いました。「そうねぇ」とおかみさんは言ってため息をつきました。「たった一人でもいたら、その子がとても小さく親指くらいしかなくても、とても嬉しいし、それでも私たちはその子を心から可愛がるんだけどねぇ。」さて、おかみさんは具合が悪くなり、七か月経つと、子供を生みました。その子には手足はきちんとあったものの、親指くらいしか大きくありませんでした。それで二人は「おれらが望んだようになったんだ。これはおれたちの可愛い子供だよ。」と言いました。そしてその大きさから二人はその子を親指太郎と呼びました。二人は十分食べさせていましたが、子供は大きくならず最初のときのままでした。それでも利口そうにものを見て、まもなく賢く素早い子供だとわかりました。というのは親指太郎がやることは何でもうまくいったからです。

ある日、お百姓は森へ木を切りにいく支度をしていました。独り言のように「誰か荷馬車を連れてきてくれたらいいのになあ」と言うと、「ああ、お父さん」と親指太郎が叫びました。「僕がすぐ荷馬車をつれていくよ。任せてくれ。決められた時間に森に着けるからさ。」お百姓はにこにこして言いました。「どうやってできるんだい?。お前は手綱をとって馬を御すには小さすぎるよ。」「そんなのはいいよ、お父さん。お母さんが車に馬をつないでくれさえすれば、僕は馬の耳に入ってどう行くか指令するよ」「そうだな」と父親は答えました。「一度やってみるか。」

時間になると母親は馬を車につなぎ、親指太郎を馬の耳に入れると、親指太郎は、「はいし、はいし」と叫びました。すると馬は主人と一緒にいるようにきちんと進んで、荷馬車は森へ行く正しい道を進みました。ちょうど角を曲がっていて親指太郎が「はいしはいし」と叫んでいるとき、たまたま二人の男がやってきました。「うわっ」と一人が言いました。「こりゃ何だ?荷馬車が来るけど、御者が馬に話してるのに姿が見えないぞ。」「あれはおかしいな。」ともう一人が言いました。「荷馬車のあとをつけてどこに止まるか見てみよう。」

ところで荷馬車はまっすぐ森へ入り、まさに木が切られていた場所へ行きました。親指太郎は父親を見ると、「ほらね、お父さん、荷馬車を連れてきたよ。さあ僕を下ろして。」と叫びました。父親は左手で馬をおさえ、右手で耳から小さい息子をとり出しました。親指太郎はすっかりご機嫌で一本のわらの上に座りました。しかし二人のよそ者は親指太郎を見て、呆気にとられあいた口がふさがりませんでした。しばらくして一人がもう一人を脇へ連れて行き、「おい、あのチビを大きな町で見世物にしたら一財産稼げるぞ。あのチビを買おう。」と言いました。二人はお百姓のところへ行き、「私たちにその小さい子を売ってください。よく面倒をみますから。」と言いました。「とんでもない!」と父親は答えました。「この子は目の中に入れても痛くないほどかわいがっているんです。世界中のお金を集めたってわしから買えませんよ。」

ところが、親指太郎はその取引を聞いて父親の上着のひだを這い上り、肩に来て耳にささやきました。「お父さん、僕を売って。すぐにまた戻ってくるから。」それで父親はかなりたくさんのお金を貰い、息子を二人の男にゆずりました。「どこに座る?」と二人は親指太郎に言いました。「ああ、帽子のつばに僕をのせてください。そうしたら僕は前へ行ったり後ろへ行ったりして、辺りを見れますから。それでも落ちませんよ。」二人は親指太郎の望む通りにしました。

親指太郎が父親に別れを告げた後、二人は親指太郎と出かけていきました。夕暮れになるまで歩くと、親指太郎が、「下ろして。用を足すから。」と言いました。「いいからそこにいろよ。」と親指太郎がのっている帽子の男が言いました。「おれにはどっちでもいいんだ。鳥だって時々おれの上にふんを落とすし。」「だめだよ」と親指太郎は言いました。「僕は礼儀作法を知ってるよ。早く下ろして。」男は帽子を脱ぎ、親指太郎を道端の地面に置きました。親指太郎は芝土の間を少し跳んだり這ったりしていましたが、突然、見つけておいたネズミ穴にスッと入ってしまいました。「さよなら、だんなさん、僕抜きで帰ってね。」と親指太郎は言って嘲りました。二人はそちらへ走っていき、ネズミの穴へ杖を差し込みましたが無駄でした。親指太郎はもっとずっと奥へ這っていき、すぐすっかり暗くなってしまったので、二人は怒りながら空っぽの財布をかかえて家に帰るしかありませんでした。

親指太郎は二人が行ってしまったとわかると、地中の通路から這い戻りました。「暗い時に地面を歩くのはとても危ない。」と言いました。「首や足が簡単に折れるからね。」幸いにも空っぽのカタツムリの殻につまずきました。「ありがたい」と言いました。「この中で無事に泊れるよ。」そして中に入りました。それからまもなく、ちょうど眠りかけた時、二人の男が通りかかるのが聞こえ、一人が「あの金持ちの牧師からどうやって金や銀をとろうか?」と言っていました。「僕が教えてやるよ」と親指太郎は二人の話しに割りこんで、叫びました。「ありゃ何だ?」とギョッとして泥棒の一人が言いました。「誰か話してるのが聞こえたぞ。」二人は耳をすまして立ち止まりました。親指太郎はまた「一緒に連れていってくれ。手伝ってやるよ。」と言いました。「だけどどこにいるんだ?」「地面を見てごらんよ、僕の声がきこえるところを見て。」と太郎は答えました。

そこで泥棒たちはとうとう太郎を見つけ、持ち上げました。「この小鬼、どうやっておれたちを手伝うんだ?」と二人は言いました。「いいかい」と太郎は言いました。「僕が鉄の棒のあいだから忍び込んで、あんたたちが欲しいものを何でも手渡すんだ。」「じゃあ来いよ。」と二人は言いました。「腕のほどをみようじゃないか。」

牧師の家に着くと、親指太郎は部屋に忍び込みましたが、すぐにありったけの大声で「ここにあるものみんな欲しいかい?」と叫びました。
泥棒たちはびっくりして、「だけど、小さい声で言えよ、誰も目を覚まさないようにな。」と言いました。
しかし、親指太郎はこれがわからない振りをして、もう一度「何が欲しいんだ?」と叫びました。「ここにあるものみんな欲しいのかい?」

隣の部屋で眠っていた料理人に、これが聞こえ、ベッドで起きあがり耳をすましました。一方泥棒たちはギョギョッとして少し離れたところまで逃げてしまいましたが、そのうちまた勇気を出して、「チビのいたずらめ、おれたちをからかってやがるんだ」と考えました。二人は戻ってきて、太郎にささやきました。「おい、まじめにやれ。何かとってよこせ。」
すると太郎はまたありったけの大声で叫びました。「本当に何でも渡すよ。手を中に入れてよ。」
耳をすましていた女中にこれがとてもはっきり聞こえたので、ベッドから跳び下り、戸に走って行きました。泥棒たちは恐れをなして亡霊の軍勢が追いかけてきてるかのように逃げましたが、女中には何も見えなくて、明かりをつけに行きました。

ろうそくをもって女中が戻って来たとき、親指太郎はみつからないで納屋に行きました。女中はすみずみを調べて何も見つからなかったので、(結局寝ぼけていただけだったんだわ)と思ってまたベッドに戻って寝ました。親指太郎は干し草の間に登り眠るのに最高の場所を見つけました。そこで夜明けまで休み、それから両親のところへ帰ろうと思いました。

しかし、他の災難が太郎を待ちうけていました。本当に、この世には心配事や難儀がたくさんあるものです。夜が明けると、女中は雌牛にえさをやるためにベッドから起きました。そのまま歩いて納屋に入り、腕いっぱいに干し草をかかえましたが、それは可哀そうにもちょうど親指太郎が中で眠っていた干し草でした。ところが、太郎はぐっすり眠っていたので何も知らず、干し草と一緒に牛の口に入ってしまってからはじめて目が覚めました。

「わあ、大変!」と太郎は叫びました。「どうして布叩き機に入ったんだ?」しかし、すぐに自分がどこにいるかわかりました。それで、牛の歯につぶされてばらばらにならないように気をつけなければなりませんでしたが、次は干し草と一緒に胃に滑り落とされました。「この小さな部屋に窓は忘れられてるよ。」と親指太郎は言いました。「陽がささないし、ろうそくも持ってこないしな。」太郎がいるところはとくに気持ち悪く、最悪なのは戸口からどんどん干し草が入り続けて、空いてる場所がどんどんすくなくなってくることでした。とうとう苦しくなって太郎は、「もう飼葉を入れるな!もう飼葉を入れるな!」と大声で叫びました。ちょうどそのとき女中がその牛の乳しぼりをしていて、だれか話すのが聞こえたのに誰も見えなくて、それが夜に聞こえた声と同じ声だとわかりました。それで仰天して椅子から滑り落ち、ミルクがこぼれてしまいました。

大急ぎで主人のところに走って行き、「大変です、だんなさま、牛が喋っています。」と言いました。「お前は気が狂ってるんだ。」と牧師は答えましたが、どうなっているのか確かめに自分でも牛小屋に行きました。ところが、牧師が足を中に踏み入れるか踏み入れないうちに、太郎は「飼葉をもう入れるな、飼葉をもう入れるな!」と叫びました。それで牧師自身も驚いて、(悪魔が牛にのり移ったんだ)と思って、牛を殺すよう命じました。

牛は殺されましたが、太郎が入っていた胃袋は堆肥の山に放り投げられました。親指太郎は胃袋から抜け出ようととても苦労してもがいていました。ところが、自分のまわりにやっといくらか空きを作って、ちょうど頭を出そうとした時に、新しい災難がおこりました。腹をすかした狼がそこへ走ってきて、胃袋をまるごと一飲みにしてしまったのです。親指太郎はくじけませんでした。(ひょっとすると狼は僕の話をきいてくれるかもしれないぞ)と考えました。それで狼のお腹から呼びかけました。「狼くん、すばらしい御馳走のあるところを知ってるよ」

「どこだい?」と狼は言いました。「これこれ、こういう家だよ。台所の流しから入りこまなくちゃいけないんだ。ケーキやベーコン、ソーセージをたらふく食べられるよ。」それで太郎は正確に父親の家を説明しました。狼は二回言われるまでもなく、夜になると流しから体を押し込み、食料品置き場で思う存分食べました。お腹がいっぱいになると狼はまた出ようとしましたが、あまりにふくれていたので同じところから出れませんでした。親指太郎はこれを計算に入れておいたので、狼の体の中で大騒ぎをはじめ、暴れまくり大声で喚き散らしました。「静かにしてくれ。」と狼は言いました。「人を起こしちゃうじゃないか。」「かまうもんか。」と親指太郎は答えました。「お前はたっぷり食べた、僕も楽しくするんだ」そしてまた力いっぱい叫び始めました。

それでとうとう父親と母親が目を覚まし、その部屋へ駆けていって戸の隙間から中を覗きました。狼が中にいるのがわかると二人は逃げて、父親は斧をもち、母親は草刈りがまを持って戻りました。部屋に入る時、「後ろにいろよ。」と男は言いました。「おれが殴ってそれでやつが死ななかったら、お前が鎌で切り倒してやつの体をばらばらに切るんだ。」すると親指太郎に両親の声が聞こえたので、「お父さん、僕ここだよ。狼の体の中なんだ」と叫びました。父親は大喜びで「有り難い、かわいい子がまた戻ったよ」と言って、子供が怪我をしないように鎌をしまえ、とおかみさんに告げました。そのあと、父親は腕を振り上げ、狼の頭を力いっぱい殴ったので、狼は死んで倒れました。それから二人はナイフや鋏をもってきて狼の体を切り開き、おちびちゃんをとり出しました。

「ああ」と父親は言いました。「お前のためにどんなに悲しかったことか。」「うん、おとうさん。僕ずいぶん世間を歩き回ったよ。ふうっ、僕はまた新鮮な空気を吸えるよ。」「じゃあ、どこへ行ってたんだ?」「あのね、おとうさん。ネズミの穴にいたり、牛のお腹にいたりして、それから狼のたいこ腹にいたんだ。もうこれからはお父さんたちといるよ。」「そうだね。おれたちも二度とお前を売らないよ。世界中の金を積まれたってごめんだね。」と両親は言って、かわいい息子を抱きしめキスしました。二人は親指太郎に飲み物と食べ物を与え、新しい服を作らせました。というのは旅をしているあいだに服はぼろぼろになってしまったからです。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.