ENGLISH

The robber bridegroom

日本語

強盗のおむこさん


There was once a miller who had a beautiful daughter, and when she was grown up he became anxious that she should be well married and taken care of; so he thought, "If a decent sort of man comes and asks her in marriage, I will give her to him." Soon after a suitor came forward who seemed very well to do, and as the miller knew nothing to his disadvantage, he promised him his daughter. But the girl did not seem to love him as a bride should love her bridegroom; she had no confidence in him; as often as she saw him or thought about him, she felt a chill at her heart. One day he said to her, "You are to be my bride, and yet you have never been to see me." The girl answered, "I do not know where your house is." Then he said, "My house is a long way in the wood." She began to make excuses, and said she could not find the way to it; but the bridegroom said, "You must come and pay me a visit next Sunday; I have already invited company, and I will strew ashes on the path through the wood, so that you will be sure to find it."

When Sunday came, and the girl set out on her way, she felt very uneasy without knowing exactly why; and she filled both pockets full of peas and lentils. There were ashes strewed on the path through the wood, but, nevertheless, at each step she cast to the right and left a few peas on the ground. So she went on the whole day until she came to the middle of the wood, where it was the darkest, and there stood a lonely house, not pleasant in her eyes, for it was dismal and unhomelike. She walked in, but there was no one there, and the greatest stillness reigned. Suddenly she heard a voice cry,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

The girl glanced round, and perceived that the voice came from a bird who was hanging in a cage by the wall. And again it cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

Then the pretty bride went on from one room into another through the whole house, but it was quite empty, and no soul to be found in it. At last she reached the cellar, and there sat a very old woman nodding her head. "Can you tell me," said the bride, "if my bridegroom lives here?" - "Oh, poor child," answered the old woman, "do you know what has happened to you? You are in a place of cutthroats. You thought you were a bride, and soon to be married, but death will be your spouse. Look here, I have a great kettle of water to set on, and when once they have you in their power they will cut you in pieces without mercy, cook you, and eat you, for they are cannibals. Unless I have pity on you, and save you, all is over with you!"

Then the old woman hid her behind a great cask, where she could not be seen. "Be as still as a mouse," said she; "do not move or go away, or else you are lost. At night, when the robbers are asleep, we will escape. I have been waiting a long time for an opportunity." No sooner was it settled than the wicked gang entered the house. They brought another young woman with them, dragging her along, and they were drunk, and would not listen to her cries and groans. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one of white wine, one of red, and one of yellow, and then they cut her in pieces. The poor bride all the while shaking and trembling when she saw what a fate the robbers had intended for her. One of them noticed on the little finger of their victim a golden ring, and as he could not draw it off easily, he took an axe and chopped it off, but the finger jumped away, and fell behind the cask on the bride's lap. The robber took up a light to look for it, but he could not find it. Then said one of the others, "Have you looked behind the great cask?" But the old woman cried, "Come to supper, and leave off looking till to-morrow; the finger cannot run away."

Then the robbers said the old woman was right, and they left off searching, and sat down to eat, and the old woman dropped some sleeping stuff into their wine, so that before long they stretched themselves on the cellar floor, sleeping and snoring. When the bride heard that, she came from behind the cask, and had to make her way among the sleepers lying all about on the ground, and she felt very much afraid lest she might awaken any of them. But by good luck she passed through, and the old woman with her, and they opened the door, and they made all haste to leave that house of murderers. The wind had carried away the ashes from the path, but the peas and lentils had budded and sprung up, and the moonshine upon them showed the way. And they went on through the night, till in the morning they reached the mill. Then the girl related to her father all that had happened to her.

When the wedding-day came, the friends and neighbours assembled, the miller having invited them, and the bridegroom also appeared. When they were all seated at table, each one had to tell a story. But the bride sat still, and said nothing, till at last the bridegroom said to her, "Now, sweetheart, do you know no story? Tell us something." She answered, "I will tell you my dream. I was going alone through a wood, and I came at last to a house in which there was no living soul, but by the wall was a bird in a cage, who cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For evil things do here betide."

And then again it said it. Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. Then I went through all the rooms, and they were all empty, and it was so lonely and wretched. At last I went down into the cellar, and there sat an old old woman, nodding her head. I asked her if my bridegroom lived in that house, and she answered, ' Ah, poor child, you have come into a place of cut-throats; your bridegroom does live here, but he will kill you and cut you in pieces, and then cook and eat you.' Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. But the old woman hid me behind a great cask, and no sooner had she done so than the robbers came home, dragging with them a young woman, and they gave her to drink wine thrice, white, red, and yellow. Sweetheart, the dream is not yet ended. And then they killed her, and cut her in pieces. Sweetheart, my dream is not yet ended. And one of the robbers saw a gold ring on the finger of the young woman, and as it was difficult to get off, he took an axe and chopped off the finger, which jumped upwards, and then fell behind the great cask on my lap. And here is the finger with the ring!" At these words she drew it forth, and showed it to the company.

The robber, who during the story had grown deadly white, sprang up, and would have escaped, but the folks held him fast, and delivered him up to justice. And he and his whole gang were, for their evil deeds, condemned and executed.
昔、粉屋がいました。この粉屋に美しい娘がいて、大人になったので、娘に準備してやり、よい結婚をさせたいと願いました。(もし良い人が来て娘を望んだら、その人に娘をやろう)と考えました。それからまもなく、娘を妻に欲しいという人がやってきて、とても金持ちのように見え、粉屋はその人に悪いところが見つからなかったので、娘を嫁にやると約束しました。しかしこの乙女は、一般の娘が婚約した男を好きなようには、この人を好きでなく、全く信頼しませんでした。この人を見たり考えたりするときはいつも虫唾が走りました。あるとき、男が娘に、「あなたは僕のいいなずけなのに、一度も家へきたことがありませんね。」と言いました。娘は、「あなたの家がどこかわかりませんもの。」と答えました。するといいなずけは、「僕の家はそこの暗い森にあります。」と言いました。娘は行かなくてすむような言い逃れをして、「そこの道がわかりませんわ。」と言いました。いいなずけは「次の日曜日にそこに僕を訪ねてきてください。もうお客たちを呼んでありますから。森の道がわかるように灰をまいておきますよ。」と言いました。

日曜になり、娘が行かなければならなくなると、自分でもどうしてなのかはっきりわかりませんでしたが、とても不安になり、道に印をつけるため、両方のポケットにエンドウ豆とレンズ豆を詰めました。森の入口に灰がまかれていて、これをたどっていきましたが、一歩ごとに地面に2,3のエンドウ豆を落としていきました。ほぼ一日じゅう歩いて、とうとう森の真ん中に着きました。そこは最も暗い所で、たった一軒の家がぽつんとあり、娘はその家が好きではありませんでした。というのはとても暗く陰気に見えたからです。中に入りましたが、誰も家の中にいなくて、シーンとした静けさが支配していました。

突然、「戻れ、戻れ、若い乙女、あなたが入ってるのは人殺しの家だよ」と叫ぶ声が聞こえ、娘は見上げて、その声が壁にかかっている鳥から出ているのがわかりました。その鳥は、「戻れ、戻れ、若い乙女、あなたが入ってるのは人殺しの家だよ」とまた叫びました。

それから、若い乙女はさらに進んで部屋から部屋へ行き、家じゅうを歩きましたが、家は全く空っぽで、人は一人も見られませんでした。とうとう穴倉に来てみると、頭が絶えず揺れているとても年とった老婆がいました。「私のいいなずけがここに住んでいるかどうか、わかりませんか?」と娘は言いました。

「ああ、可哀そうに」と老婆は答えました。「まったくあんた、どこへ来るんだよ。あんたは強盗の巣にいるんだよ。あんたはじき結婚する嫁だと思ってるんだろうが、死んで結婚式をすることになるよ。ほら、水が入っているそこの大釜を、わたしゃ、火にかけさせられてるんじゃが、やつらはあんたをつかまえると、情け容赦なく細切れにして、煮て、食べてしまうよ。あいつらは人食いだからね。あんたを可哀そうに思って助けてやらなんだら、あんたはお終いだねえ。」

そう言って老婆は、娘がみつからない大樽のかげに連れて行き、「ねずみみたいにじっとしてるんだよ、音を立てたり、動いたりしてはだめだ。そうしないとあんたはお終いだからね。夜に強盗たちが眠ったら逃げるよ。わたしゃ、ずっとその機会を待っていたんじゃ。」と言いました。娘が隠れるとすぐに、罪深い連中が帰ってきました。強盗たちは別の若い娘を引きずって一緒に連れてきました。みんな酔っぱらっていて、その娘が泣き喚いても全く注意を払いませんでした。

強盗たちは娘に、グラスになみなみと注いだワインを3杯、一杯は白、一杯は赤、一杯は黄色のワインを飲ませました。このため娘の心臓は二つに破裂しました。そうして、娘の優美な衣服をはぎとり、テーブルに娘を載せ、美しい体を細切れにし、それに塩を振りかけました。樽のかげの可哀そうな花嫁はぶるぶる震えていました。というのは強盗たちが自分をどんな目にあわせようとしていたかとてもよくわかったからです。強盗の一人が殺された娘の指にはまっている金の指輪に気がつき、その指輪がすぐに外れなかったので、斧をとって指を切りとりました。しかし、指は空に跳ね上がって樽を越え、まっすぐ花嫁の胸の中に落ちました。その強盗はろうそくを持ち、指を捜そうとしましたが見つけられませんでした。それで、別の強盗が、「お前、大樽の後ろを捜したかい?」と言いました。しかし、老婆が「さあ、お食べな。捜すのは明日までおいときな。指はあんたから逃げないさね。」と言いました。

すると強盗たちは、「お婆のいう通りだ。」と言って、捜すのを止め、座って食べました。老婆がワインに眠り薬を入れておいたので、強盗たちはまもなく穴倉で寝そべって眠りいびきをかきました。花嫁はそれを聞くと、大樽の後ろから出てきて、下に列になって寝転んで眠っている強盗たちをまたがなければならず、一人でも目覚めさせやしないかと恐怖でいっぱいでした。しかし、神様が助けてくださり、娘は無事に乗り切りました。老婆が娘と一緒に上へあがり、戸をあけ、二人はありったけの速さで人殺しの巣から逃げました。風がまかれた灰を飛ばしてしまっていましたが、エンドウ豆とレンズ豆が芽を出し育っていて、月の明かりで道がわかりました。二人は一晩じゅう歩き、やがて朝に水車小屋に着きました。それから娘は父親に出来事を全くありのままに話してきかせました。

結婚式が祝われる日が来ると、花婿が現れ、粉屋は親戚や友達をみんな招いていました。みんなが食卓についたとき、一人一人が何か話をするように言われました。花嫁はじっと座って何も言いませんでした。すると、花婿が花嫁に、「さあ、君、何も知らないのかい?他の人たちのように何か僕たちに話しなさいよ。」と言いました。花嫁は答えました。「では私は夢の話をします。私は一人で森を歩いていました。そして最後に一軒の家に着きました。そこには誰もいませんでしたが、壁にかごに入っている鳥がいて、、『戻れ、戻れ、若い乙女、あなたが入ってるのは人殺しの家だよ』と叫びました。これを鳥はもう一回叫びました。あなた、これはただ夢に見たことですよ。」

「それから私は全部の部屋に行きました。みんな空っぽでした。そして何かとても恐ろしい感じがしました。とうとう私は穴倉に下りて行きました。そこに、頭がゆらゆらしているとてもとても年とったおばあさんがいました。私は『この家に私の花婿が住んでいますか?』とおばあさんに尋ねました。おばあさんは『ああ、可哀そうに。あんたは強盗の巣に入ったんだよ。確かにあんたの婿はここに住んでるけど、あんたを細切れにして殺し、煮て食べるんだよ。』と答えました。あなた、これはただ夢に見たんですよ。だけど、おばあさんは私を大樽の後ろに隠しました。それで隠れるとすぐ、強盗たちが帰ってきて、一人の娘を一緒に引っ張って来ました。その娘に白と赤と黄色の三種類のワインを飲ませて、娘の心臓は二つに破れました。あなた、これはただ夢に見たことですよ。そうして強盗たちは娘のきれいなドレスをひきはがし、テーブルの上で娘のきれいな体を切り刻んで、塩をかけました。あなた、これはただ夢に見たことですよ。強盗の一人が娘の小さな指にまだ指輪があるとわかって、指輪が抜きにくかったので、斧をとって指を切り離しました。だけど指は跳ね上がって大樽の後ろに跳び、私の胸に落ちました。それで指輪のついた指がありますわ。」こう言って娘は指をとりだし、そこにいる人たちにみせました。

強盗は、この話の間に灰のように青ざめ、跳びあがって逃げようとしましたが、お客たちがきつくおさえつけ、警察にひきわたしました。それから花婿とその仲間の強盗たちはみんなその忌まわしい行いで死刑にされました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.