ENGLISH

Fitcher's Bird

日本語

フィッチャーの鳥


There was once a wizard who used to take the form of a poor man, and went to houses and begged, and caught pretty girls. No one knew whither he carried them, for they were never seen more. One day he appeared before the door of a man who had three pretty daughters; he looked like a poor weak beggar, and carried a basket on his back, as if he meant to collect charitable gifts in it. He begged for a little food, and when the eldest daughter came out and was just reaching him a piece of bread, he did but touch her, and she was forced to jump into his basket. Thereupon he hurried away with long strides, and carried her away into a dark forest to his house, which stood in the midst of it. Everything in the house was magnificent; he gave her whatsoever she could possibly desire, and said: "My darling, thou wilt certainly be happy with me, for thou hast everything thy heart can wish for." This lasted a few days, and then he said: "I must journey forth, and leave thee alone for a short time; there are the keys of the house; thou mayst go everywhere and look at everything except into one room, which this little key here opens, and there I forbid thee to go on pain of death." He likewise gave her an egg and said: "Preserve the egg carefully for me, and carry it continually about with thee, for a great misfortune would arise from the loss of it." She took the keys and the egg, and promised to obey him in everything. When he was gone, she went all round the house from the bottom to the top, and examined everything. The rooms shone with silver and gold, and she thought she had never seen such great splendour. At length she came to the forbidden door; she wished to pass it by, but curiosity let her have no rest. She examined the key, it looked just like any other; she put it in the keyhole and turned it a little, and the door sprang open. But what did she see when she went in? A great bloody basin stood in the middle of the room, and therein lay human beings, dead and hewn to pieces, and hard by was a block of wood, and a gleaming axe lay upon it. She was so terribly alarmed that the egg which she held in her hand fell into the basin. She got it out and washed the blood off, but in vain, it appeared again in a moment. She washed and scrubbed, but she could not get it out.

It was not long before the man came back from his journey, and the first things which he asked for were the key and the egg. She gave them to him, but she trembled as she did so, and he saw at once by the red spots that she had been in the bloody chamber. "Since thou hast gone into the room against my will," said he, "thou shalt go back into it against thine own. Thy life is ended." He threw her down, dragged her thither by her hair, cut her head off on the block, and hewed her in pieces so that her blood ran on the ground. Then he threw her into the basin with the rest.

"Now I will fetch myself the second," said the wizard, and again he went to the house in the shape of a poor man, and begged. Then the second daughter brought him a piece of bread; he caught her like the first, by simply touching her, and carried her away. She did not fare better than her sister. She allowed herself to be led away by her curiosity, opened the door of the bloody chamber, looked in, and had to atone for it with her life on the wizard's return. Then he went and brought the third sister, but she was clever and crafty. When he had given her the keys and the egg, and had left her, she first put the egg away with great care, and then she examined the house, and at last went into the forbidden room. Alas, what did she behold! Both her sisters lay there in the basin, cruelly murdered, and cut in pieces. But she began to gather their limbs together and put them in order, head, body, arms and legs. And when nothing further was wanting the limbs began to move and unite themselves together, and both the maidens opened their eyes and were once more alive. Then they rejoiced and kissed and caressed each other. On his arrival, the man at once demanded the keys and the egg, and as he could perceive no trace of any blood on it, he said: "Thou hast stood the test, thou shalt be my bride." He now had no longer any power over her, and was forced to do whatsoever she desired. "Oh, very well," said she, "thou shalt first take a basketful of gold to my father and mother, and carry it thyself on thy back; in the meantime I will prepare for the wedding." Then she ran to her sisters, whom she had hidden in a little chamber, and said: "The moment has come when I can save you. The wretch shall himself carry you home again, but as soon as you are at home send help to me." She put both of them in a basket and covered them quite over with gold, so that nothing of them was to be seen, then she called in the wizard and said to him: "Now carry the basket away, but I shall look through my little window and watch to see if thou stoppest on the way to stand or to rest."

The wizard raised the basket on his back and went away with it, but it weighed him down so heavily that the perspiration streamed from his face. Then he sat down and wanted to rest awhile, but immediately one of the girls in the basket cried: "I am looking through my little window, and I see that thou art resting. Wilt thou go on at once?" He thought it was his bride who was calling that to him; and got up on his legs again. Once more he was going to sit down, but instantly she cried: "I am looking through my little window, and I see that thou art resting. Wilt thou go on directly?" And whenever he stood still, she cried this, and then he was forced to go onwards, until at last, groaning and out of breath, he took the basket with the gold and the two maidens into their parents' house.

At home, however, the bride prepared the marriage-feast, and sent invitations to the friends of the wizard. Then she took a skull with grinning teeth, put some ornaments on it and a wreath of flowers, carried it upstairs to the garret-window, and let it look out from thence. When all was ready, she got into a barrel of honey, and then cut the feather-bed open and rolled herself in it, until she looked like a wondrous bird, and no one could recognize her. Then she went out of the house, and on her way she met some of the wedding-guests, who asked:

"O, Fitcher's bird, how com'st thou here?"
"I come from Fitcher's house quite near."
"And what may the young bride be doing?"
"From cellar to garret she's swept all clean,
And now from the window she's peeping, I ween."

At last she met the bridegroom, who was coming slowly back. He, like the others, asked:

"O, Fitcher's bird, how com'st thou here?"
"I come from Fitcher's house quite near."
"And what may the young bride be doing?
"From cellar to garret she's swept all clean,
And now from the window she's peeping, I ween."

The bridegroom looked up, saw the decked-out skull, thought it was his bride, and nodded to her, greeting her kindly. But when he and his guests had all gone into the house, the brothers and kinsmen of the bride, who had been sent to rescue her, arrived. They locked all the doors of the house, that no one might escape, set fire to it, and the wizard and all his crew had to burn.
昔、貧しい男のなりをして物乞いをして家々を訪ね、きれいな娘をさらう魔法使いがいました。男がどこへ娘たちを連れて行ったのか誰もわかりませんでした。というのは娘たちは二度と見つからなかったからです。ある日、男はきれいな娘が三人いる男の家の前に現れました。男は貧しい体の弱そうな乞食のようにみせて、中に施しのものを集めているかのように背中にかごを背負っていました。男は、少し食べ物をください、と言い、一番上の娘が出てきて、パンを一切れ渡そうとしました。そのとき男はただ娘に触れただけで、娘はかごに跳びこまされました。すぐに男は大股で急いで去り、娘を暗い森の真ん中に立っている自分の家に運んで行きました。家の中の何でも豪華でした。男は娘に欲しいものは何でも与え、「ねえ、君、君は僕のところできっと幸せだろう。君が望むものを何でももらえるんだからね。」と言いました。こうして2,3日経つと、男は、「僕は旅にでかけなくてはならない。ちょっとの間君をひとりにしておく。さあ、家の鍵だよ。どこへ行ってもいいし、何でも見ていいよ。ただ一つの部屋はだめだ。そこはこの小さい鍵で開くんだが、そこにいくと君の命をとることにするからね。」と言いました。男は卵も一個渡して、「その卵を大事にとっておいて、いつも持って歩いてほしい。それを失くしたら、大きな災難がふりかかるんだから。」と言いました。

娘は鍵と卵を受け取り、何でも男のいうことに従うと約束しました。男がいなくなると、娘は下から上まで家をぐるっと回り何でも調べてみました。どの部屋も金銀で輝き、娘はこんなに華やかで美しいのは見たことがないと思いました。とうとう禁じられた部屋の戸に来て、娘は通りすぎようとしました。しかし、見たくて見たくてたまりませんでした。鍵をよく見ても他の鍵と同じように見えました。

娘が鍵穴に鍵を入れ、少し回すと戸はパッと開きました。しかし、部屋に入った時娘は何を見たでしょうか?部屋の真ん中に大きな血だらけの鉢があり、その中には死んでばらばらに切られた人間が何人も入っていました。すぐ近くには台木があり、その上に光っている斧が置いてありました。娘はひどく驚き、手に持っていた卵を鉢に落としてしまいました。卵を取り出し血を拭いとりましたが無駄で、血はすぐに出てきてしまいました。洗ってもこすってもとることができませんでした。

まもなく男が旅から戻り、早速鍵と卵を返せと言いました。娘は男に渡しましたが、渡しながら震えていました。男は、赤いしみを見てすぐに、娘が血の部屋に入ったことを知りました。「君はわたしの意思に背きあの部屋に入ったのだから、君の意思に背いてそこに戻ることになる。お前はおしまいだ。」と男は言いました。男は娘を投げ倒し、髪をつかんでひきずり、台木の上で頭を切り落とし、ばらばらに切ったので血が床に流れました。それから鉢に投げ入れて他の死体と一緒にしました。

「さあ今度は二番目の娘を連れてこよう。」と魔法使いは言いました。また貧しい男の姿をしてその家にいき、物乞いをしました。すると二番目の娘が一切れのパンを持ってきました。男は最初の娘のように、娘にただ触れてつかまえ、連れ去りました。二番目の娘も姉と同じ運命をたどりました。見たい気持ちに負けて、血の部屋の戸を開け、覗き込み、魔法使いが戻ったとき命で償いました。それから男は出かけて三番目の娘を連れてきました。しかし、娘は賢く抜け目がありませんでした。男が鍵と卵を渡し、行ってしまうと、娘はとても用心深く卵をしまって、それから家を見て回り、しまいに禁じられた部屋に入りました。ああ、娘は何を見たことか。姉たち二人が残酷に殺されバラバラに切られてそこの鉢に入っていました。しかし、娘は手足を集め始め、頭、胴体、腕、脚をきちんとそろえました。そしてあと何も足りないものがなくなると、手足が動き始め、一緒にくっついて、二人の娘は目を開き、もう一度生き返りました。それから三人は喜び、キスし、抱き合いました。

帰ってくるとすぐ、男は鍵と卵を寄こせと言い、血の跡が何もないのがわかると、「お前は試験に合格した。私の花嫁になってもらおう。」と言いました。今度は男はもう娘をどうすることもできなくなり、娘の望むことを何でもするしかなくなりました。「まあ、いいわ。」と娘は言いました。「まず私の父と母にかごいっぱいの金を持って自分で背中にかついで行ってね。その間に私は結婚式の支度をするわ。」それから娘は小さな部屋に隠しておいた姉たちのところに走って行き、「姉さんたちを助けられる時が来たわ。あいつにまた姉さんたちを連れて行かせるのよ。だけど家へ着いたらすぐ私に助けを寄こしてよ。」と言いました。娘は二人をかごに入れ、その上をすっかり金でおおいました。それで二人は何も見えませんでした。それから魔法使いを呼び入れ、「さあかごを持って行って。だけど私は小さな窓からあなたが途中で立ち止まったり休んだりしないか見ていますからね。」と言いました。

魔法使いはかごを背中にあげ、背負ってでかけましたが、とても重かったので汗が顔から流れました。それで男は座って少し休もうとしました。しかし、すぐにかごの中にいる娘の一人が、「窓からみているのよ。あなたが休んでいるのが見えるわ。すぐに歩いていってよ。」と叫びました。男は話しているのが花嫁だと思い、また立ちあがりました。もう一度男は座ろうとしましたが、すぐに娘は「窓からみているのよ。あなたが休んでいるのが見えるわ。すぐに歩いていってよ。」と叫びました。そして男が立ち止まるたびに、娘はこう叫び、男は歩き続けるしかなく、とうとう息を切らしてあえぎながら、金と二人の娘が入っているかごを両親の家に運び入れました。

ところで、家では花嫁が結婚式の支度をして、魔法使いの友達に招待状を送りました。それから歯をむきだしている頭蓋骨をとってきて、それに飾り付けをし花束をもたせ、二階の屋根裏部屋の窓に運び、そこから外を覗くようにさせました。全部の用意ができると、娘は蜂蜜の樽に入り、羽根布団を切り開いてその中で転がりました。それでとうとう娘は不思議な鳥のように見え、誰も娘だとわかりませんでした。それから娘は家から出ていきました。途中で結婚式のお客に何人か会い、その人たちは尋ねました。「ああ、フィッチャーの鳥さん、どこからここにきたんですか?」「すぐ近くのフィッチャーさんの家からきたのよ。」「若い花嫁は何をしているだろうか?」「地下室から屋根裏部屋まですっかりきれいに掃除して、今は窓から覗いていると思うわ。」

最後に娘はゆっくり戻ってくる花婿に会いました。花婿も、他の人たちのように尋ねました。「ああ、フィッチャーの鳥さん、どこからここにきたんですか?」「すぐ近くのフィッチャーさんの家からきたのよ。」「若い花嫁は何をしているだろうか?」「地下室から屋根裏部屋まですっかりきれいに掃除して、今は窓から覗いていると思うわ。」

花婿は上を見上げ、飾り立てた頭蓋骨を見て花嫁だと思い、やさしく挨拶を送って頭蓋骨に頷きました。しかし、花婿とお客たちが家の中へ入ってしまったとき、娘を助けに送られた花嫁の兄たちや親せきの人たちが着きました。みんなは、誰も逃げないように家の戸を全部閉め切って、火をつけました。それで魔法使いとその仲間はみんな焼け死んでしまいました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.