Compare two languages:




ENGLISH

The almond tree

DEUTSCH

Von dem Machandelboom


Long time ago, perhaps as much as two thousand years, there was a rich man, and he had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other very much, and they had no children, though they wished greatly for some, and the wife prayed for one day and night. Now, in the courtyard in front of their house stood an almond tree; and one day in winter the wife was standing beneath it, and paring an apple, and as she pared it she cut her finger, and the blood fell upon the snow. "Ah," said the woman, sighing deeply, and looking down at the blood, "if only I could have a child as red as blood, and as white as snow!" And as she said these words, her heart suddenly grew light, and she felt sure she should have her wish. So she went back to the house, and when a month had passed the snow was gone; in two months everything was green; in three months the flowers sprang out of the earth; in four months the trees were in full leaf, and the branches were thickly entwined; the little birds began to sing, so that the woods echoed, and the blossoms fell from the trees; when the fifth month had passed the wife stood under the almond tree, and it smelt so sweet that her heart leaped within her, and she fell on her knees for joy; and when the sixth month had gone, the fruit was thick and fine, and she remained still; and the seventh month she gathered the almonds, and ate them eagerly, and was sick and sorrowful; and when the eighth month had passed she called to her husband, and said, weeping, "If I die, bury me under the almond tree." Then she was comforted and happy until the ninth month had passed, and then she bore a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she saw it her joy was so great that she died.

Her husband buried her under the almond tree, and he wept sore; time passed, and he became less sad; and after he had grieved a little more he left off, and then he took another wife.

His second wife bore him a daughter, and his first wife's child was a son, as red as blood and as white as snow. Whenever the wife looked at her daughter she felt great love for her, but whenever she looked at the little boy, evil thoughts came into her heart, of how she could get all her husband's money for her daughter, and how the boy stood in the way; and so she took great hatred to him, and drove him from one corner to another, and gave him a buffet here and a cuff there, so that the poor child was always in disgrace; when he came back after school hours there was no peace for him. Once, when the wife went into the room upstairs, her little daughter followed her, and said, "Mother, give me an apple." - "Yes, my child," said the mother, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, and the chest had a great heavy lid with a strong iron lock. "Mother," said the little girl, "shall not my brother have one too?" That was what the mother expected, and she said, "Yes, when he comes back from school." And when she saw from the window that he was coming, an evil thought crossed her mind, and she snatched the apple, and took it from her little daughter, saying, "You shall not have it before your brother." Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut to the lid. Then the little boy came in at the door, and she said to him in a kind tone, but with evil looks, "My son, will you have an apple?" - "Mother," said the boy, "how terrible you look! yes, give me an apple!" Then she spoke as kindly as before, holding up the cover of the chest, "Come here and take out one for yourself." And as the boy was stooping over the open chest, crash went the lid down, so that his head flew off among the red apples. But then the woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. And she went to the chest of drawers in her bedroom and took a white handkerchief out of the nearest drawer, and fitting the head to the neck, she bound them with the handkerchief, so that nothing should be seen, and set him on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

Then came little Marjory into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing before the fire stirring a pot of hot water. "Mother," said Marjory, "my brother is sitting before the door and he has an apple in his hand, and looks very pale; I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me; it seems very strange." - "Go again to him," said the mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marjory went again and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But as he took no notice, she gave him a box on the ear, and his head fell off, at which she was greatly terrified, and began to cry and scream, and ran to her mother, and said, "O mother.1 I have knocked my brother's head off!" and cried and screamed, and would not cease. "O Marjory!" said her mother, "what have you done? but keep quiet, that no one may see there is anything the matter; it can't be helped now; we will put him out of the way safely."

When the father came home and sat down to table, he said, "Where is my son?" But the mother was filling a great dish full of black broth, and Marjory was crying bitterly, for she could not refrain. Then the father said again, "Where is my son?" - "Oh," said the mother, "he is gone into the country to his great-uncle's to stay for a little while." - "What should he go for?" said the father, "and without bidding me good-bye, too!" - "Oh, he wanted to go so much, and he asked me to let him stay there six weeks; he will be well taken care of." - "Dear me," said the father, "I am quite sad about it; it was not right of him to go without bidding me good-bye." With that he began to eat, saying, "Marjory, what are you crying for? Your brother will come back some time." After a while he said, "Well, wife, the food is very good; give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted, until he had eaten it all up, and be threw the bones under the table. Then Marjory went to her chest of drawers, and took one of her best handkerchiefs from the bottom drawer, and picked up all the bones from under the table and tied them up in her handkerchief, and went out at the door crying bitterly. She laid them in the green grass under the almond tree, and immediately her heart grew light again, and she wept no more. Then the almond tree began to wave to and fro, and the boughs drew together and then parted, just like a clapping of hands for joy; then a cloud rose from the tree, and in the midst of the cloud there burned a fire, and out of the fire a beautiful bird arose, and, singing most sweetly, soared high into the air; and when he had flown away, the almond tree remained as it was before, but the handkerchief full of bones was gone. Marjory felt quite glad and light-hearted, just as if her brother were still alive. So she went back merrily into the house and had her dinner. The bird, when it flew away, perched on the roof of a goldsmith's house, and began to sing,

''It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

The goldsmith was sitting in his shop making a golden chain, and when he heard the bird, who was sitting on his roof and singing, he started up to go and look, and as he passed over his threshold he lost one of his slippers; and he went into the middle of the street with a slipper on one foot and-only a sock on the other; with his apron on, and the gold chain in one hand and the pincers in the other; and so he stood in the sunshine looking up at the bird. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I do not sing for nothing twice; if you will give me that gold chain I will sing again." - "Very well," said the goldsmith, "here is the gold chain; now do as you said." Down came the bird and took the gold chain in his right claw, perched in front of the goldsmith, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

Then the bird flew to a shoemaker's, and perched on his roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

When the shoemaker heard, he ran out of his door in his shirt sleeves and looked up at the roof of his house, holding his hand to shade his eyes from the sun. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called in at his door, "Wife, come out directly; here is a bird singing beautifully; only listen." Then he called his daughter, all his children, and acquaintance, both young men and maidens, and they came up the street and gazed on the bird, and saw how beautiful it was with red and green feathers, and round its throat was as it were gold, and its eyes twinkled in its head like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing for nothing twice; you must give me something." - "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop; on the top shelf stands a pair of red shoes; bring them here." So the wife went and brought the shoes. "Now bird," said the man, "sing us that piece again." And the bird came down and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew up again to the roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I ciy,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished he flew away, with the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left claw, and he flew till he reached a mill, and the mill went "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And in the mill sat twenty millers-men hewing a millstone- "hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack," while the mill was going "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And the bird perched on a linden tree that stood in front of the mill, and sang, "It was my mother who murdered me; " Here one of the men looked up. "It was my father who ate of me;" Then two more looked up and listened. "It was my sister Marjory " Here four more looked up. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Now there were only eight left hewing. "And laid them under the almond tree." Now only five. "Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry," Now only one. "Oh what a beautiful bird am I!" At length the last one left off, and he only heard the end. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; let me hear it all; sing that again!" - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing it twice for nothing; if you will give me the millstone I will sing it again." - "Indeed," said the man, "if it belonged to me alone you should have it." - "All right," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers heaved up the stone with poles - "yo! heave-ho! yo! heave-ho!" and the bird stuck his head through the hole in the middle, and with the millstone round his neck he flew up to the tree and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished, he spread his wings,, having in the right claw the chain, and in the left claw the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew away to his father's house.

In the parlour sat the father, the mother, and Marjory at the table; the father said, "How light-hearted and cheerful I feel." - "Nay," said the mother, "I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming." But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof "Oh," said the father, "I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend." - "Nay," said the wife, "I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veins," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang, '' It was my mother who murdered me; " And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning. "It was my father who ate of me;'' "O mother!" said the-father, "there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon. ''It was my sister Marjory " Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said, "I must go out to see the bird." - "Oh do not go!" said the wife, "I feel as if the house were on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, "Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me." Then his wife was so terrified that she fell all along on the floor, and her cap came off. Then the bird began again to sing, "It was my mother who murdered me;" - "Oh," groaned the mother, "that I were a thousand fathoms under ground, so as not to be obliged to hear it." - "It was my father who ate of me;" Then the woman lay as if she were dead. "It was my sister Marjory " - "Oh," said Marjory, "I will go out, too, and see if the bird will give me anything." And so she went. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Then he threw the shoes down to her. "And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And poor Marjory all at once felt happy and joyful, and put on her red shoes, and danced and jumped for joy. "Oh dear," said she, "I felt so sad before I went outside, and now my heart is so light! He is a charming bird to have given me a pair of red shoes." But the mother's hair stood on end, and looked like flame, and she said, "Even if the world is coming to an end, I must go out for a little relief." Just as she came outside the door, crash went the millstone on her head, and crushed her flat. The father and daughter rushed out, and saw smoke and flames of fire rise up; but when that had gone by, there stood the little brother; and he took his father and Marjory by the hand, and they felt very happy and content, and went indoors, and sat to the table, and had their dinner.
Das ist nun lange her, wohl an die zweitausend Jahre, da war einmal ein reicher Mann, der hatte eine schöne fromme Frau, und sie hatten sich beide sehr lieb, hatten aber keine Kinder. Sie wünschten sich aber sehr welche, und die Frau betete darum soviel Tag und Nacht; aber sie kriegten und kriegten keine. Vor ihrem Hause war ein Hof, darauf stand ein Machandelbaum. Unter dem stand die Frau einstmals im Winter und schälte sich einen Apfel, und als sie sich den Apfel so schälte, da schnitt sie sich in den Finger, und das Blut fiel in den Schnee. "Ach," sagte die Frau und seufzte so recht tief auf, und sah das Blut vor sich an, und war so recht wehmütig: "Hätte ich doch ein Kind, so rot wie Blut und so weiss wie Schnee." Und als sie das sagte, da wurde ihr so recht fröhlich zumute: Ihr war so recht, als sollte es etwas werden. Dann ging sie nach Hause, und es ging ein Monat hin, da verging der Schnee; und nach zwei Monaten, da wurde alles grün; nach drei Monaten, da kamen die Blumen aus der Erde; und nach vier Monaten, da schossen alle Bäume ins Holz, und die grünen Zweige waren alle miteinander verwachsen. Da sangen die Vöglein, dass der ganze Wald erschallte, und die Blüten fielen von den Bäumen, da war der fünfte Monat vergangen, und sie stand immer unter dem Machandelbaum, der roch so schön. Da sprang ihr das Herz vor Freude, und sie fiel auf die Knie und konnte sich gar nicht lassen. Und als der sechste Monat vorbei war, da wurden die Früchte dick und stark, und sie wurde ganz still. Und im siebenten Monat, da griff sie nach den Machandelbeeren und ass sie so begehrlich; und da wurde sie traurig und krank. Da ging der achte Monat hin, und sie rief ihren Mann und weinte und sagte: "Wenn ich sterbe, so begrabe mich unter dem Machandelbaum." Da wurde sie ganz getrost und freute sich, bis der neunte Monat vorbei war: da kriegte sie ein Kind so weiss wie der Schnee und so rot wie Blut, und als sie das sah, da freute sie sich so, dass sie starb.

Da begrub ihr Mann sie unter dem Machandelbaum, und er fing an, so sehr zu weinen; eine Zeitlang dauerte das, dann flossen die Tränen schon sachter, und als er noch etwas geweint hatte, da hörte er auf, und dann nahm er sich wieder eine Frau.

Mit der zweiten Frau hatte er eine Tochter; das Kind aber von der ersten Frau war ein kleiner Sohn, und war so rot wie Blut und so weiss wie Schnee. Wenn die Frau ihre Tochter so ansah, so hatte sie sie sehr lieb; aber dann sah sie den kleinen Jungen an, und das ging ihr so durchs Herz, und es dünkte sie, als stünde er ihr überall im Wege, und sie dachte dann immer, wie sie ihrer Tochter all das Vermögen zuwenden wollte, und der Böse gab es ihr ein, dass sie dem kleinen Jungen ganz gram wurde, und sie stiess ihn aus einer Ecke in die andere, und puffte ihn hier und knuffte ihn dort, so dass das arme Kind immer in Angst war. Wenn er dann aus der Schule kam, so hatte er keinen Platz, wo man ihn in Ruhe gelassen hätte.

Einmal war die Frau in die Kammer hoch gegangen; da kam die kleine Tochter auch herauf und sagte: "Mutter, gib mir einen Apfel." - "Ja, mein Kind," sagte die Frau und gab ihr einen schönen Apfel aus der Kiste; die Kiste aber hatte einen grossen schweren Deckel mit einem grossen scharfen eisernen Schloss. "Mutter," sagte die kleine Tochter, "soll der Bruder nicht auch einen haben?" Das verdross die Frau, doch sagte sie: "Ja, wenn er aus der Schule kommt." Und als sie ihn vom Fenster aus gewahr wurde, so war das gerade, als ob der Böse in sie gefahren wäre, und sie griff zu und nahm ihrer Tochter den Apfel wieder weg und sagte; "Du sollst ihn nicht eher haben als der Bruder." Da warf sie den Apfel in die Kiste und machte die Kiste zu. Da kam der kleine Junge in die Tür; da gab ihr der Böse ein, dass sie freundlich zu ihm sagte: "Mein Sohn, willst du einen Apfel haben?" und sah ihn so jähzornig an. "Mutter," sagte der kleine Junge, "was siehst du so grässlich aus! Ja, gib mir einen Apfel!" - "Da war ihr, als sollte sie ihm zureden. "Komm mit mir," sagte sie und machte den Deckel auf, "hol dir einen Apfel heraus!" Und als der kleine Junge sich hineinbückte, da riet ihr der Böse; bratsch! Schlug sie den Deckel zu, dass der Kopf flog und unter die roten Äpfel fiel. Da überlief sie die Angst, und sie dachte: "Könnt ich das von mir bringen!" Da ging sie hinunter in ihre Stube zu ihrer Kommode und holte aus der obersten Schublade ein weisses Tuch und setzt den Kopf wieder auf den Hals und band das Halstuch so um, dass man nichts sehen konnte und setzt ihn vor die Türe auf einen Stuhl und gab ihm den Apfel in die Hand.

Darnach kam Marlenchen zu ihrer Mutter in die Küche. Die stand beim Feuer und hatte einen Topf mit heissem Wasser vor sich, den rührte sie immer um. "Mutter," sagte Marlenchen, "der Bruder sitzt vor der Türe und sieht ganz weiss aus und hat einen Apfel in der Hand. Ich hab ihn gebeten, er soll mir den Apfel geben, aber er antwortet mir nicht; das war mir ganz unheimlich." - "Geh noch einmal hin," sagte die Mutter, "und wenn er dir nicht antwortet, dann gib ihm eins hinter die Ohren." Da ging Marlenchen hin und sagte: "Bruder, gib mir den Apfel!" Aber er schwieg still; da gab sie ihm eins hinter die Ohren. Da fiel der Kopf herunter; darüber erschrak sie und fing an zu weinen und zu schreien und lief zu ihrer Mutter und sagte: "Ach, Mutter, ich hab meinem Bruder den Kopf abgeschlagen," und weinte und weinte und wollte sich nicht zufrieden geben. "Marlenchen," sagte die Mutter, "was hast du getan! Aber schweig nur still, dass es kein Mensch merkt; das ist nun doch nicht zu ändern, wir wollen ihn in Sauer kochen." Da nahm die Mutter den kleinen Jungen und hackte ihn in Stücke, tat sie in den Topf und kochte ihn in Sauer. Marlenchen aber stand dabei und weinte und weinte, und die Tränen fielen alle in den Topf, und sie brauchten kein Salz.

Da kam der Vater nach Hause und setzte sich zu Tisch und sagte: "Wo ist denn mein Sohn?" Da trug die Mutter eine grosse, grosse Schüssel mit Schwarzsauer auf, und Marlenchen weinte und konnte sich nicht halten. Da sagte der Vater wieder: "Wo ist denn mein Sohn?" - "Ach," sagte die Mutter, "er ist über Land gegangen, zu den Verwandten seiner Mutter; er wollte dort eine Weile bleiben." - "Was tut er denn dort? Er hat mir nicht mal Lebewohl gesagt!" - "Oh, er wollte so gern hin und bat mich, ob er dort wohl sechs Wochen bleiben könnte; er ist ja gut aufgehoben dort." - "Ach," sagte der Mann, "mir ist so recht traurig zumute; das ist doch nicht recht, er hätte mir doch Lebewohl sagen können." Damit fing er an zu essen und sagte: "Marlenchen, warum weinst du? Der Bruder wird schon wiederkommen." - "Ach Frau," sagte er dann, "was schmeckt mir das Essen schön! Gib mir mehr!" Und je mehr er ass, um so mehr wollte er haben und sagte: "Gebt mir mehr, ihr sollt nichts davon aufheben, das ist, als ob das alles mein wäre." Und er ass und ass, und die Knochen warf er alle unter den Tisch, bis er mit allem fertig war. Marlenchen aber ging hin zu ihrer Kommode und nahm aus der untersten Schublade ihr bestes seidenes Tuch und holte all die Beinchen und Knochen unter dem Tisch hervor und band sie in das seidene Tuch und trug sie vor die Tür und weinte blutige Tränen. Dort legte sie sie unter den Machandelbaum in das grüne Gras, und als sie sie dahin gelegt hatte, da war ihr auf einmal ganz leicht, und sie weinte nicht mehr. Da fing der Machandelbaum an, sich zu bewegen, und die zweige gingen immer so voneinander und zueinander, so recht, wie wenn sich einer von Herzen freut und die Hände zusammenschlägt. Dabei ging ein Nebel von dem Baum aus, und mitten in dem Nebel, da brannte es wie Feuer, und aus dem Feuer flog so ein schöner Vogel heraus, der sang so herrlich und flog hoch in die Luft, und als er weg war, da war der Machandelbaum wie er vorher gewesen war, und das Tuch mit den Knochen war weg. Marlenchen aber war so recht leicht und vergnügt zumute, so recht, als wenn ihr Bruder noch lebte. Da ging sie wieder ganz lustig nach Hause, setzte sich zu Tisch und ass. Der Vogel aber flog weg und setzte sich auf eines Goldschmieds Haus und fing an zu singen:

"Mein Mutter der mich schlacht,
mein Vater der mich ass,
mein Schwester der Marlenichen
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legt's unter den Machandelbaum.
Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Der Goldschmied sass in seiner Werkstatt und machte eine goldene Kette; da hörte er den Vogel, der auf seinem Dach sass und sang, und das dünkte ihn so schön. Da stand er auf, und als er über die Türschwelle ging, da verlor er einen Pantoffel. Er ging aber so recht mitten auf die Strasse hin, mit nur einem Pantoffel und einer Socke; sein Schurzfell hatte er vor, und in der einen Hand hatte er die goldene Kette, und in der anderen die Zange; und die Sonne schien so hell auf die Strasse. Da stellte er sich nun hin und sah den Vogel an. "Vogel," sagte er da, "wie schön kannst du singen! Sing mir das Stück noch mal!" - "Nein," sagte der Vogel, "zweimal sing ich nicht umsonst. Gib mir die goldene Kette, so will ich es dir noch einmal singen." - "Da," sagte der Goldschmied, "hast du die goldene Kette; nun sing mir das noch einmal!" Da kam der Vogel und nahm die goldene Kette in die rechte Kralle, setzte sich vor den Goldschmied hin und sang: "Mein Mutter der mich schlacht, mein Vater der mich ass, mein Schwester der Marlenichen, sucht alle meine Benichen, bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch, legt's unter den Machandelbaum. Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Da flog der Vogel fort zu einem Schuster, und setzt sich auf sein Dach und sang: "Mein Mutter der mich schlacht, mein Vater der mich ass, mein Schwester der Marlenichen, sucht alle meine Benichen, bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch, legt's unter den Machandelbaum. Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Der Schuster hörte das und lief in Hemdsärmeln vor seine Tür und sah zu seinem Dach hinauf und musste die Hand vor die Augen halten, dass die Sonne ihn nicht blendete. "Vogel," sagte er, "was kannst du schön singen." Da rief er zur Tür hinein: "Frau, komm mal heraus, da ist ein Vogel; sieh doch den Vogel, der kann mal schön singen." Dann rief er noch seine Tochter und die Kinder und die Gesellen, die Lehrjungen und die Mägde, und sie kamen alle auf die Strasse und sahen den Vogel an, wie schön er war; und er hatte so schöne rote und grüne Federn, und um den Hals war er wie lauter Gold, und die Augen blickten ihm wie Sterne im Kopf. "Vogel," sagte der Schuster, "nun sing mir das Stück noch einmal!" - "Nein," sagte der Vogel, "zweimal sing ich nicht umsonst, du musst mir etwas schenken." - "Frau," sagte der Mann, "geh auf den Boden, auf dem obersten Wandbrett, da stehen ein paar rote Schuh, die bring mal her!" Da ging die Frau hin und holte die Schuhe. "Da, Vogel," sagte der Mann, "nun sing mir das Lied noch einmal!" Da kam der Vogel und nahm die Schuhe in die linke Kralle und flog wieder auf das Dach und sang:

"Mein Mutter der mich schlacht,
mein Vater der mich ass,
mein Schwester der Marlenichen
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legt's unter den Machandelbaum.
Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Und als er ausgesungen hatte, da flog er weg; die Kette hatte er in der rechten und die Schuhe in der linken Kralle, und er flog weit weg, bis zu einer Mühle, und die Mühle ging: Klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe. Und in der Mühle sassen zwanzig Mühlknappen, die klopften einen Stein und hackten: Hick hack, hick hack, hick hack; und die Mühle ging klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe. Da setzte sich der Vogel auf einen Lindenbaum, der vor der Mühle stand und sang: "Mein Mutter der mich schlacht," da hörte einer auf; "mein Vater der mich ass," da hörten noch zwei auf und hörten zu; "mein Schwester der Marlenichen" da hörten wieder vier auf; "sucht alle meine Benichen, bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch," nun hackten nur acht; "legt's unter," nun nur noch fünf; "den Machandelbaum" – nun nur noch einer; "Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!" Da hörte der letzte auch auf, und er hatte gerade noch den Schluss gehört. "Vogel," sagte er, "was singst du schön!" Lass mich das auch hören, sing mir das noch einmal!" - "Neun," sagte der Vogel, "zweimal sing ich nicht umsonst; gib mir den Mühlenstein, so will ich das noch einmal singen." - "Ja," sagte er, "wenn er mir allein gehörte, so solltest du ihn haben." - "Ja," sagten die anderen, "wenn er noch einmal singt, so soll er ihn haben." Da kam der Vogel heran und die Müller fassten alle zwanzig mit Bäumen an und hoben den Stein auf, "hu uh uhp, hu uh uhp, hu uh uhp!" Da steckte der Vogel den Hals durch das Loch und nahm ihn um wie einen Kragen und flog wieder auf den Baum und sang:

"Mein Mutter der mich schlacht,
mein Vater der mich ass,
mein Schwester der Marlenichen
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legt's unter den Machandelbaum.
Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Und als er das ausgesungen hatte, da tat er die Flügel auseinander und hatte in der echten Kralle die Kette und in der linken die Schuhe und um den Hals den Mühlenstein, und flog weit weg zu seines Vaters Haus.

In der Stube sass der Vater, die Mutter und Marlenchen bei Tisch, und der Vater sagte: "Ach, was wird mir so leicht, mir ist so recht gut zumute." - "Nein," sagte die Mutter, "mir ist so recht angst, so recht, als wenn ein schweres Gewitter käme." Marlenchen aber sass und weinte und weinte. Da kam der Vogel angeflogen, und als er sich auf das Dach setzte, da sagte der Vater: "Ach, mir ist so recht freudig, und die Sonne scheint so schön, mir ist ganz, als sollte ich einen alten Bekannten wiedersehen!" - "Nein," sagte die Frau, "mir ist angst, die Zähne klappern mir und mir ist, als hätte ich Feuer in den Adern." Und sie riss sich ihr Kleid auf, um Luft zu kriegen. Aber Marlenchen sass in der Ecke und weinte, und hatte ihre Schürze vor den Augen und weinte die Schürze ganz und gar nass. Da setzte sich der Vogel auf den Machandelbaum und sang: "Meine Mutter die mich schlacht" - Da hielt sich die Mutter die Ohren zu und kniff die Augen zu und wollte nicht sehen und hören, aber es brauste ihr in den Ohren wie der allerstärkste Sturm und die Augen brannten und zuckten ihr wie Blitze. "Mein Vater der mich ass" - "Ach Mutter," sagte der Mann, "da ist ein schöner Vogel, der singt so herrlich und die Sonne scheint so warm, und das riecht wie lauter Zinnamom." (Zimt) "Mein Schwester der Marlenichen" - Da legte Marlenchen den Kopf auf die Knie und weinte in einem fort. Der Mann aber sagte: "Ich gehe hinaus; ich muss den Vogel in der Nähe sehen." - "Ach, geh nicht," sagte die Frau, "mir ist, als bebte das ganze Haus und stünde in Flammen." Aber der Mann ging hinaus und sah sich den Vogel an - "sucht alle meine Benichen, bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch, legt's unter den Machandelbaum. Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Damit liess der Vogel die goldene Kette fallen, und sie fiel dem Mann gerade um den Hals, so richtig herum, dass sie ihm ganz wunderschön passte. Da ging er herein und sagte: "Sieh, was ist das für ein schöner Vogel, hat mir eine so schöne goldene Kette geschenkt und sieht so schön aus." Der Frau aber war so angst, dass sie lang in die Stube hinfiel und ihr die Mütze vom Kopf fiel. Da sang der Vogel wieder: "Mein Mutter der mich schlacht" - "Ach, dass ich tausend Klafter unter der Erde wäre, dass ich das nicht zu hören brauchte!" - "Mein Vater der mich ass" - Da fiel die Frau wie tot nieder. "Mein Schwester der Marlenichen" - "Ach," sagte Marlenchen, "ich will doch auch hinausgehen und sehn, ob mir der Vogel etwas schenkt?" Da ging sie hinaus. "Sucht alle meine Benichen, bindt sie in ein seiden Tuch" - Da warf er ihr die Schuhe herunter. "Legt's unter den Machandelbaum. Kiwitt, kiwitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!"

Da war ihr so leicht und fröhlich. Sie zog sich die neuen roten Schuhe an und tanzte und sprang herein. "Ach," sagte sie, "mir war so traurig, als ich hinausging, und nun ist mir so leicht. Das ist mal ein herrlicher Vogel, hat mir ein Paar rote Schuhe geschenkt!" - "Nein," sagte die Frau und sprang auf, und die Haare standen ihr zu Berg wie Feuerflammen, "mir ist, als sollte die Welt untergehen; ich will auch hinaus, damit mir leichter wird." Und als sie aus der Tür kam, bratsch! Warf ihr der Vogel den Mühlstein auf den Kopf, dass sie ganz zerquetscht wurde. Der Vater und Marlenchen hörten das und gingen hinaus. Da ging ein Dampf und Flammen und Feuer aus von der Stätte, und als das vorbei war, da stand der kleine Bruder da, und er nahm seinen Vater und Marlenchen bei der Hand und waren alle drei so recht vergnügt und gingen ins Haus, setzten sich an den Tisch und assen.