ENGLISH

The almond tree

FRANÇAIS

Le conte du genévrier


Long time ago, perhaps as much as two thousand years, there was a rich man, and he had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other very much, and they had no children, though they wished greatly for some, and the wife prayed for one day and night. Now, in the courtyard in front of their house stood an almond tree; and one day in winter the wife was standing beneath it, and paring an apple, and as she pared it she cut her finger, and the blood fell upon the snow. "Ah," said the woman, sighing deeply, and looking down at the blood, "if only I could have a child as red as blood, and as white as snow!" And as she said these words, her heart suddenly grew light, and she felt sure she should have her wish. So she went back to the house, and when a month had passed the snow was gone; in two months everything was green; in three months the flowers sprang out of the earth; in four months the trees were in full leaf, and the branches were thickly entwined; the little birds began to sing, so that the woods echoed, and the blossoms fell from the trees; when the fifth month had passed the wife stood under the almond tree, and it smelt so sweet that her heart leaped within her, and she fell on her knees for joy; and when the sixth month had gone, the fruit was thick and fine, and she remained still; and the seventh month she gathered the almonds, and ate them eagerly, and was sick and sorrowful; and when the eighth month had passed she called to her husband, and said, weeping, "If I die, bury me under the almond tree." Then she was comforted and happy until the ninth month had passed, and then she bore a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she saw it her joy was so great that she died.

Her husband buried her under the almond tree, and he wept sore; time passed, and he became less sad; and after he had grieved a little more he left off, and then he took another wife.

His second wife bore him a daughter, and his first wife's child was a son, as red as blood and as white as snow. Whenever the wife looked at her daughter she felt great love for her, but whenever she looked at the little boy, evil thoughts came into her heart, of how she could get all her husband's money for her daughter, and how the boy stood in the way; and so she took great hatred to him, and drove him from one corner to another, and gave him a buffet here and a cuff there, so that the poor child was always in disgrace; when he came back after school hours there was no peace for him. Once, when the wife went into the room upstairs, her little daughter followed her, and said, "Mother, give me an apple." - "Yes, my child," said the mother, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, and the chest had a great heavy lid with a strong iron lock. "Mother," said the little girl, "shall not my brother have one too?" That was what the mother expected, and she said, "Yes, when he comes back from school." And when she saw from the window that he was coming, an evil thought crossed her mind, and she snatched the apple, and took it from her little daughter, saying, "You shall not have it before your brother." Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut to the lid. Then the little boy came in at the door, and she said to him in a kind tone, but with evil looks, "My son, will you have an apple?" - "Mother," said the boy, "how terrible you look! yes, give me an apple!" Then she spoke as kindly as before, holding up the cover of the chest, "Come here and take out one for yourself." And as the boy was stooping over the open chest, crash went the lid down, so that his head flew off among the red apples. But then the woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. And she went to the chest of drawers in her bedroom and took a white handkerchief out of the nearest drawer, and fitting the head to the neck, she bound them with the handkerchief, so that nothing should be seen, and set him on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

Then came little Marjory into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing before the fire stirring a pot of hot water. "Mother," said Marjory, "my brother is sitting before the door and he has an apple in his hand, and looks very pale; I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me; it seems very strange." - "Go again to him," said the mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marjory went again and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But as he took no notice, she gave him a box on the ear, and his head fell off, at which she was greatly terrified, and began to cry and scream, and ran to her mother, and said, "O mother.1 I have knocked my brother's head off!" and cried and screamed, and would not cease. "O Marjory!" said her mother, "what have you done? but keep quiet, that no one may see there is anything the matter; it can't be helped now; we will put him out of the way safely."

When the father came home and sat down to table, he said, "Where is my son?" But the mother was filling a great dish full of black broth, and Marjory was crying bitterly, for she could not refrain. Then the father said again, "Where is my son?" - "Oh," said the mother, "he is gone into the country to his great-uncle's to stay for a little while." - "What should he go for?" said the father, "and without bidding me good-bye, too!" - "Oh, he wanted to go so much, and he asked me to let him stay there six weeks; he will be well taken care of." - "Dear me," said the father, "I am quite sad about it; it was not right of him to go without bidding me good-bye." With that he began to eat, saying, "Marjory, what are you crying for? Your brother will come back some time." After a while he said, "Well, wife, the food is very good; give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted, until he had eaten it all up, and be threw the bones under the table. Then Marjory went to her chest of drawers, and took one of her best handkerchiefs from the bottom drawer, and picked up all the bones from under the table and tied them up in her handkerchief, and went out at the door crying bitterly. She laid them in the green grass under the almond tree, and immediately her heart grew light again, and she wept no more. Then the almond tree began to wave to and fro, and the boughs drew together and then parted, just like a clapping of hands for joy; then a cloud rose from the tree, and in the midst of the cloud there burned a fire, and out of the fire a beautiful bird arose, and, singing most sweetly, soared high into the air; and when he had flown away, the almond tree remained as it was before, but the handkerchief full of bones was gone. Marjory felt quite glad and light-hearted, just as if her brother were still alive. So she went back merrily into the house and had her dinner. The bird, when it flew away, perched on the roof of a goldsmith's house, and began to sing,

''It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

The goldsmith was sitting in his shop making a golden chain, and when he heard the bird, who was sitting on his roof and singing, he started up to go and look, and as he passed over his threshold he lost one of his slippers; and he went into the middle of the street with a slipper on one foot and-only a sock on the other; with his apron on, and the gold chain in one hand and the pincers in the other; and so he stood in the sunshine looking up at the bird. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I do not sing for nothing twice; if you will give me that gold chain I will sing again." - "Very well," said the goldsmith, "here is the gold chain; now do as you said." Down came the bird and took the gold chain in his right claw, perched in front of the goldsmith, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

Then the bird flew to a shoemaker's, and perched on his roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

When the shoemaker heard, he ran out of his door in his shirt sleeves and looked up at the roof of his house, holding his hand to shade his eyes from the sun. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called in at his door, "Wife, come out directly; here is a bird singing beautifully; only listen." Then he called his daughter, all his children, and acquaintance, both young men and maidens, and they came up the street and gazed on the bird, and saw how beautiful it was with red and green feathers, and round its throat was as it were gold, and its eyes twinkled in its head like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing for nothing twice; you must give me something." - "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop; on the top shelf stands a pair of red shoes; bring them here." So the wife went and brought the shoes. "Now bird," said the man, "sing us that piece again." And the bird came down and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew up again to the roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I ciy,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished he flew away, with the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left claw, and he flew till he reached a mill, and the mill went "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And in the mill sat twenty millers-men hewing a millstone- "hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack," while the mill was going "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And the bird perched on a linden tree that stood in front of the mill, and sang, "It was my mother who murdered me; " Here one of the men looked up. "It was my father who ate of me;" Then two more looked up and listened. "It was my sister Marjory " Here four more looked up. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Now there were only eight left hewing. "And laid them under the almond tree." Now only five. "Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry," Now only one. "Oh what a beautiful bird am I!" At length the last one left off, and he only heard the end. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; let me hear it all; sing that again!" - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing it twice for nothing; if you will give me the millstone I will sing it again." - "Indeed," said the man, "if it belonged to me alone you should have it." - "All right," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers heaved up the stone with poles - "yo! heave-ho! yo! heave-ho!" and the bird stuck his head through the hole in the middle, and with the millstone round his neck he flew up to the tree and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished, he spread his wings,, having in the right claw the chain, and in the left claw the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew away to his father's house.

In the parlour sat the father, the mother, and Marjory at the table; the father said, "How light-hearted and cheerful I feel." - "Nay," said the mother, "I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming." But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof "Oh," said the father, "I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend." - "Nay," said the wife, "I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veins," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang, '' It was my mother who murdered me; " And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning. "It was my father who ate of me;'' "O mother!" said the-father, "there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon. ''It was my sister Marjory " Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said, "I must go out to see the bird." - "Oh do not go!" said the wife, "I feel as if the house were on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, "Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me." Then his wife was so terrified that she fell all along on the floor, and her cap came off. Then the bird began again to sing, "It was my mother who murdered me;" - "Oh," groaned the mother, "that I were a thousand fathoms under ground, so as not to be obliged to hear it." - "It was my father who ate of me;" Then the woman lay as if she were dead. "It was my sister Marjory " - "Oh," said Marjory, "I will go out, too, and see if the bird will give me anything." And so she went. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Then he threw the shoes down to her. "And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And poor Marjory all at once felt happy and joyful, and put on her red shoes, and danced and jumped for joy. "Oh dear," said she, "I felt so sad before I went outside, and now my heart is so light! He is a charming bird to have given me a pair of red shoes." But the mother's hair stood on end, and looked like flame, and she said, "Even if the world is coming to an end, I must go out for a little relief." Just as she came outside the door, crash went the millstone on her head, and crushed her flat. The father and daughter rushed out, and saw smoke and flames of fire rise up; but when that had gone by, there stood the little brother; and he took his father and Marjory by the hand, and they felt very happy and content, and went indoors, and sat to the table, and had their dinner.
Il y a de cela bien longtemps, au moins deux mille ans, vivait un homme riche qui avait une femme de grande beauté, honnête et pieuse; ils s'aimaient tous les deux d'un grand amour, mais ils n'avaient pas d'enfant et ils en désiraient tellement, et la femme priait beaucoup, beaucoup, nuit et jour pour avoir un enfant; mais elle n'arrivait pas, non, elle n'arrivait pas à en avoir.
Devant leur maison s'ouvrait une cour où se dressait un beau genévrier, et une fois, en hiver, la femme était sous le genévrier et se pelait une pomme; son couteau glissa et elle se coupa le doigt assez profondément pour que le sang fît quelques taches dans la neige. La femme regarda le sang devant elle, dans la neige, et soupira très fort en se disant, dans sa tristesse: « Oh! si j'avais un enfant, si seulement j'avais un enfant vermeil comme le sang et blanc comme la neige! » Dès qu'elle eut dit ces mots, elle se sentit soudain toute légère et toute gaie avec le sentiment que son vœu serait réalisé. Elle rentra dans la maison et un mois passa: la neige disparut; un deuxième mois, et tout avait reverdi; un troisième mois, et la terre se couvrit de fleurs; un quatrième mois, et dans la forêt, les arbres étaient tout épais et leurs branches vertes s'entrecroisaient sans presque laisser de jour: les oiseaux chantaient en foule et tout le bois retentissait de leur chant, les arbres perdaient leurs fleurs qui tombaient sur le sol; le cinquième mois passé, elle était un jour sous le genévrier et cela sentait si bon que son cœur déborda de joie et qu'elle en tomba à genoux, tant elle se sentait heureuse; puis le sixième mois s'écoula, et les fruits se gonflèrent, gros et forts, et la femme devint toute silencieuse; le septième mois passé, elle cueillit les baies du genévrier et les mangea toutes avec avidité, et elle devint triste et malade; au bout du huitième mois, elle appela son mari et lui dit en pleurant: « Quand je mourrai, enterre-moi sous le genévrier. » Elle en éprouva une immense consolation, se sentit à nouveau pleine de confiance et heureuse jusqu'à la fin du neuvième mois. Alors elle mit au monde un garçon blanc comme la neige et vermeil comme le sang, et lorsqu'elle le vit, elle en fut tellement heureuse qu'elle en mourut.
Son mari l'enterra alors sous le genévrier et la pleura tant et tant: il ne faisait que la pleurer tout le temps. Mais un jour vint qu'il commença à la pleurer moins fort et moins souvent, puis il ne la pleura plus que quelquefois de temps à autre; puis il cessa de la pleurer tout à fait. Un peu de temps passa encore, maintenant qu'il ne la pleurait plus, et ensuite il prit une autre femme.
De cette seconde épouse, il eut une fille; et c'était un garçon qu'il avait de sa première femme: un garçon vermeil comme le sang et blanc comme la neige. La mère, chaque fois qu'elle regardait sa fille, l'aimait beaucoup, beaucoup; mais si elle regardait le petit garçon, cela lui écorchait le cœur de le voir; il lui semblait qu'il empêchait tout, qu'il était toujours là en travers, qu'elle l'avait dans les jambes continuellement; et elle se demandait comment faire pour que toute la fortune revînt à sa fille, elle y réfléchissait, poussée par le Malin, et elle se prit à détester le petit garçon qu'elle n'arrêtait pas de chasser d'un coin à l'autre, le frappant ici, le pinçant là, le maltraitant sans cesse, de telle sorte que le pauvre petit ne vivait plus que dans la crainte. Quand il revenait de l'école, il n'avait plus un instant de tranquillité.
Un jour, la femme était dans la chambre du haut et la petite fille monta la rejoindre en lui disant:
- Mère, donne-moi une pomme!
- Oui, mon enfant! lui dit sa mère, en lui choisissant dans le bahut la plus belle pomme qu'elle put trouver. Ce bahut, où l'on mettait les pommes, avait un couvercle épais et pesant muni d'une serrure tranchante, en fer.
- Mère, dit la petite fille, est-ce que mon frère n'en aura pas une aussi?
La femme en fut agacée, mais elle répondit quand même:
- Bien sûr, quand il rentrera de l'école.
Mais quand elle le vit qui revenait, en regardant par la fenêtre, ce fut vraiment comme si le Malin l'avait possédée: elle reprit la pomme qu'elle avait donnée à sa fille, en lui disant: « Tu ne dois pas l'avoir avant ton frère. » Et elle la remit dans le bahut, dont elle referma le pesant couvercle.
Et lorsque le petit garçon fut arrivé en haut, le Malin lui inspira son accueil aimable et ses paroles gentilles: « Veux-tu une pomme, mon fils? » Mais ses regards démentaient ses paroles car elle fixait sur lui des yeux féroces, si féroces que le petit garçon lui dit:
- Mère, tu as l'air si terrible: tu me fais peur. Oui, je voudrais bien une pomme.
Sentant qu'il lui fallait insister, elle lui dit:
- Viens avec moi! et, l'amenant devant le gros bahut, elle ouvrit le pesant couvercle et lui dit: Tiens! prends toi-même la pomme que tu voudras!
Le petit garçon se pencha pour prendre la pomme, et alors le Diable la poussa et boum! elle rabattit le lourd couvercle avec une telle force que la tête de l'enfant fut coupée et roula au milieu des pommes rouges.
Alors elle fut prise de terreur (mais alors seulement) et pensa: « Ah! si je pouvais éloigner de moi ce que j'ai fait! » Elle courut dans une autre pièce, ouvrit une commode pour y prendre un foulard blanc, puis elle revint au coffre, replaça la tête sur son cou, la serra dans le foulard pour qu'on ne puisse rien voir et assit le garçon sur une chaise, devant la porte, avec une pomme dans la main.
La petite Marlène, sa fille, vint la retrouver dans la cuisine et lui dit, tout en tournant une cuillère dans une casserole qu'elle tenait sur le feu:
- Oh! mère, mon frère est assis devant la porte et il est tout blanc; il tient une pomme dans sa main, et quand je lui ai demandé s'il voulait me la donner, il ne m'a pas répondu. J'ai peur!
- Retournes-y, dit la mère, et s'il ne te répond pas, flanque-lui une bonne claque!
La petite Marlène courut à la porte et demanda: « Frère, donne-moi la pomme, tu veux? » Mais il resta muet et elle lui donna une gifle bien sentie, en y mettant toutes ses petites forces. La tête roula par terre et la fillette eut tellement peur qu'elle se mit à hurler en pleurant, et elle courut, toute terrifiée, vers sa mère:
- Oh! mère, j'ai arraché la tête de mon frère!
Elle sanglotait, sanglotait à n'en plus finir, la pauvre petite Marlène. Elle en était inconsolable.
- Marlène, ma petite fille, qu'as-tu fait? dit la mère. Quel malheur! Mais à présent tiens-toi tranquille et ne dis rien, que personne ne le sache, puisqu'il est trop tard pour y changer quelque chose et qu'on n'y peut rien. Nous allons le faire cuire en ragoût, à la sauce brune.
La mère alla chercher le corps du garçonnet et le coupa en menus morceaux pour le mettre à la sauce brune et le faire cuire en ragoût. Mais la petite Marlène ne voulait pas s'éloigner et pleurait, pleurait et pleurait, et ses larmes tombaient dans la marmite, tellement qu'il ne fallut pas y mettre de sel.
Le père rentra à la maison pour manger, se mit à table et demanda: « Où est mon fils? » La mère vint poser sur la table une pleine marmite de ragoût à la sauce brune et petite Marlène pleurait sans pouvoir s'en empêcher. Une seconde fois, le père demanda « Mais où est donc mon fils?
- Oh! dit la mère, il est allé à la campagne chez sa grand-tante; il y restera quelques jours.
- Mais que va-t-il faire là-bas? demanda le père et il est parti sans seulement me dire au revoir!
- Il avait tellement envie d'y aller, répondit la femme; il m'a demandé s'il pouvait y rester six semaines et je le lui ai permis. Il sera bien là-bas.
- Je me sens tout attristé, dit le père; ce n'est pas bien qu'il soit parti sans rien me dire. Il aurait pu quand même me dire adieu! »
Tout en parlant de la sorte, le père s'était mis à manger; mais il se tourna vers l'enfant qui pleurait et lui demanda:
- Marlène, mon petit, pourquoi pleures-tu? Ton frère va revenir bientôt. Puis il se tourna vers sa femme: « 0 femme, lui dit-il, quel bon plat tu as fait là! Sers-m'en encore. »
Elle le resservit, mais plus il en mangeait, et plus il en voulait.
- Donne-m'en, donne-m'en plus, je ne veux en laisser pour personne: il me semble que tout est à moi et doit me revenir.
Et il mangea, mangea jusqu'à ce qu'il ne restât plus rien, suçant tous les petits os, qu'il jetait à mesure sous la table. Mais la petite Marlène se leva et alla chercher dans le tiroir du bas de sa commode le plus joli foulard qu'elle avait, un beau foulard de soie, puis, quand son père eut quitté la table, elle revint ramasser tous les os et les osselets, qu'elle noua dans son foulard de soie pour les emporter dehors en pleurant à gros sanglots. Elle alla et déposa son petit fardeau dans le gazon, sous le genévrier; et quand elle l'eut mis là, soudain son coeur se sentit tout léger et elle ne pleura plus. Le genévrier se mit à bouger, écartant ses branches et les resserrant ensemble, puis les ouvrant de nouveau et les refermant comme quelqu'un qui manifeste sa joie à grands gestes des mains. Puis il y eut soudain comme un brouillard qui descendit de l'arbre jusqu'au sol, et au milieu de ce brouillard c'était comme du feu, et de ce feu sortit un oiseau splendide qui s'envola très haut dans les airs en chantant merveilleusement. Lorsque l'oiseau eut disparu dans le ciel, le genévrier redevint comme avant, mais le foulard avec les ossements n'était plus là. La petite Marlène se sentit alors toute légère et heureuse, comme si son frère était vivant; alors elle rentra toute joyeuse à la maison, se mit à table et mangea.
L'oiseau qui s'était envolé si haut redescendit se poser sur la maison d'un orfèvre, et là il se mit à chanter:

Ma mère m'a tué;
Mon père m'a mangé;
Ma sœurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

L'orfèvre était à son travail, dans son atelier, occupé à fabriquer une chaînette d'or; mais lorsqu'il entendit l'oiseau qui chantait sur son toit, cela lui parut si beau, si beau qu'il se leva précipitamment, perdit une pantoufle sur son seuil et courut ainsi jusqu'au milieu de la rue, un pied chaussé, l'autre en chaussette, son grand tablier devant lui, tenant encore dans sa main droite ses pinces à sertir, et dans la gauche la chaînette d'or; et le soleil brillait clair dans la rue. Alors il resta là et regarda le bel oiseau auquel il dit:
- Oiseau, que tu sais bien chanter! Comme c'est beau! Chante-le-moi encore une fois, ton morceau!
- Non, dit l'oiseau, je ne chante pas deux fois pour rien. Donne-moi la chaînette d'or, et je le chanterai encore.
- Tiens, prends la chaînette d'or, elle est à toi, dit l'orfèvre, et maintenant chante-moi encore une fois ton beau chant.
L'oiseau vint prendre la chaînette d'or avec sa patte droite, se mit en face de l'orfèvre et chanta:

Ma mère m'a tué;
Mon père m'a mangé;
Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Et aussitôt il s'envola pour aller se poser sur le toit de la maison d'un cordonnier, où il chanta:

Ma mère m'a tué;
Mon père m'a mangé;
Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Le cordonnier entendit ce chant et courut en bras de chemise devant sa porte pour regarder sur son toit, et il dut mettre la main devant ses yeux pour ne pas être aveuglé par le soleil qui brillait si fort.
- Oiseau, lui dit-il, comme tu sais bien chanter!
Il repassa sa porte et rentra chez lui pour appeler sa femme. « Femme, lui cria-t-il, viens voir un peu dehors: il y a un oiseau, regarde-le, cet oiseau qui sait si bien chanter! » Il appela aussi sa fille et les autres enfants, et encore ses commis et la servante et le valet, qui vinrent tous dans la rue et regardèrent le bel oiseau qui chantait si bien et qui était si beau, avec des plumes rouges et vertes, et du jaune autour de son cou: on aurait dit de l'or pur; et ses yeux scintillants on aurait dit qu'il avait deux étoiles dans sa tête!
- Oiseau, dit le cordonnier, maintenant chante encore une fois ton morceau.
- Non, dit l'oiseau, je ne chante pas deux fois pour rien; il faut que tu me fasses un cadeau.
- Femme, dit le cordonnier, monte au grenier: sur l'étagère la plus haute, il y a une paire de chaussures rouges; apporte-les-moi.
La femme monta et rapporta les chaussures.
- Tiens, c'est pour toi, l'oiseau! dit le cordonnier. Et maintenant chante encore une fois.
L'oiseau descendit et prit les chaussures avec sa patte gauche, puis il se envola sur le toit où il chanta:

Ma mère m'a tué;
Mon père m'a mangé;
Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Et quand il eut chanté, il s'envola, serrant la chaîne d'or dans sa patte droite et les souliers dans sa gauche, et il vola loin, loin, jusqu'à un moulin qui tournait, tac-tac, tac-tac, tac-tac, tac-tac; et devant la porte du moulin il y avait vingt garçons meuniers qui piquaient une meule au marteau, hic-hac, hic-hac, hic-hac, pendant que tournait le moulin, tac-tac, tac-tac, tac-tac. Alors l'oiseau alla se percher dans un tilleul et commença à chanter:

Ma mère m'a tué.

Un premier s'arrêta et écouta:

Mon père m'a mangé.

Deux autres s'arrêtèrent et écoutèrent:

Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine.

Quatre autres s'arrêtèrent à leur tour:

Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie.

A présent, ils n'étaient plus que huit à frapper encore:

Qu'elle a porté

Cinq seulement frappaient encore:

sous le genévrier.

Il n'en restait plus qu'un qui frappait du marteau:

Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Le dernier, à son tour, s'est aussi arrêté et il a même encore entendu la fin.
- Oiseau, dit-il, ce que tu chantes bien! Fais-moi entendre encore une fois ce que tu as chanté, je n'ai pas entendu.
- Non, dit l'oiseau, je ne chante pas deux fois pour rien. Donne-moi la meule et je chanterai encore une fois.
- Tu l'aurais, bien sûr, si elle était à moi tout seul, répondit le garçon meunier.
- S'il chante encore une fois, approuvèrent tous les autres, il est juste qu'il l'ait, et il n'a qu'à la prendre.
L'oiseau descendit de l'arbre et les vingt garçons meuniers, avec des leviers, soulevèrent la lourde meule, ho-hop! ho-hop! ho-hop! ho-hop! Et l'oiseau passa son cou par le trou du centre, prenant la meule comme un collier avec lequel il s'envola de nouveau sur son arbre pour chanter:

Ma mère m'a tué;
Mon père m'a mangé;
Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Dès qu'il eut fini, il déploya ses ailes et s'envola, et il avait la chaînette d'or dans sa serre droite, et la paire de souliers dans sa serre gauche, et la meule était autour de son cou. Et il vola ainsi loin, très loin, jusqu'à la maison de son père.
Le père, la mère et petite Marlène sont là, assis à table. Et le père dit:
- C'est drôle comme je me sens bien, tout rempli de lumière!
- Oh! pas moi, dit la mère, je me sens accablée comme s'il allait éclater un gros orage.
Petite Marlène est sur sa chaise, qui pleure et qui pleure sans rien dire. L'oiseau donne ses derniers coups d'ailes, et quand il se pose sur le toit de la maison, le père dit:
- Ah! je me sens vraiment tout joyeux et le soleil est si beau: il me semble que je vais revoir une vieille connaissance.
- Oh! pas moi, dit la mère, je me sens oppressée et tout apeurée, j'ai les dents qui claquent, et dans mes veines on dirait qu'il y a du feu!
Elle se sent si mal qu'elle déchire son corsage pour essayer de respirer et se donner de l'air. Et la petite Marlène, dans son coin, est là qui pleure, qui pleure, et qui se tient son tablier devant les yeux; et elle pleure tellement qu'elle a complètement mouillé son assiette. L'oiseau est venu se percher sur le genévrier; il se met à chanter:

Ma mère m'a tué.

Alors la mère se bouche les oreilles et ferme les yeux pour ne rien voir ni entendre; mais ses oreilles bourdonnent et elle entend comme un terrible tonnerre dedans, ses yeux la brûlent et elle voit comme des éclairs dedans.

Mon père m'a mangé.

- Oh! mère, dit le père, dehors il y a un splendide oiseau qui chante merveilleusement, le soleil brille et chauffe magnifiquement, on respire un parfum qui ressemble à de la cannelle.

Ma soeurette Marlène
A pris bien de la peine.

La petite Marlène cache sa tête dans ses genoux et pleure de plus en plus.
- Je sors, dit le père, il faut que je voie cet oiseau de tout près.
- Oh non, n'y va pas! proteste la mère. Il me semble que toute la maison tremble sur sa base et qu'elle s'effondre dans les flammes!
L'homme alla dehors néanmoins et regarda l'oiseau.

Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie
Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

Aux dernières notes, l'oiseau laissa tomber adroitement la chaîne d'or qui vint juste se mettre autour du cou de l'homme, exactement comme un collier qui lui allait très bien.
- Regardez! dit l'homme en rentrant, voilà le cadeau que le bel oiseau m'a fait: cette magnifique chaîne d'or. Et voyez comme il est beau!
Mais la femme, dans son angoisse, s'écroula de tout son long dans la pièce et son bonnet lui tomba de la tête. L'oiseau, de nouveau, chantait:

Ma mère m'a tué.

- Ah! s'écria la femme, si je pouvais être à mille pieds sous terre pour ne pas entendre cela!

Mon père m'a mangé.

La femme retomba sur le dos, blanche comme une morte.

Ma soeurette Marlène

chantait l'oiseau, et la petite Marlène s'exclama: « Je vais sortir aussi et voir quel cadeau l'oiseau me fera!» Elle se leva et sortit.

A pris bien de la peine
Pour recueillir mes os jetés
Dessous la table, et les nouer
Dans son foulard de soie.

Avec ces mots, l'oiseau lui lança les souliers.

Qu'elle a porté sous le genévrier.
Kywitt, kywitt, bel oiseau que je suis!

La petite Marlène sentit que tout devenait lumineux et gai pour elle; elle enfila les souliers rouges et neufs et se mit à danser et à sauter, tellement elle s'y trouvait bien, rentrant toute heureuse dans la maison.
- Oh! dit-elle, moi qui me sentais si triste quand je suis venue dehors, et à présent tout est si clair! C'est vraiment un merveilleux oiseau que celui-là, et il m'a fait cadeau de souliers rouges!
- Que non! que non! dit la femme en revenant à elle et en se relevant, et ses cheveux se dressaient sur sa tête comme des langues de feu. Pour moi, c'est comme si le monde entier s'anéantissait: il faut que je sorte aussi, peut-être que je me sentirai moins mal dehors!

Mais aussitôt qu'elle eut franchi la porte, badaboum! l'oiseau laissa tomber la meule sur sa tête et la lui mit en bouillie. Le père et petite Marlène entendirent le fracas et sortirent pour voir. Mais que virent-ils? De cet endroit s'élevait une vapeur qui s'enflamma et brûla en montant comme un jet de flammes, et quand ce fut parti, le petit frère était là, qui les prit tous les deux par la main. Et tous trois, pleins de joie, rentrèrent dans la maison, se mirent à table et mangèrent.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.