ENGLISH

The almond tree

日本語

ねずの木の話


Long time ago, perhaps as much as two thousand years, there was a rich man, and he had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other very much, and they had no children, though they wished greatly for some, and the wife prayed for one day and night. Now, in the courtyard in front of their house stood an almond tree; and one day in winter the wife was standing beneath it, and paring an apple, and as she pared it she cut her finger, and the blood fell upon the snow. "Ah," said the woman, sighing deeply, and looking down at the blood, "if only I could have a child as red as blood, and as white as snow!" And as she said these words, her heart suddenly grew light, and she felt sure she should have her wish. So she went back to the house, and when a month had passed the snow was gone; in two months everything was green; in three months the flowers sprang out of the earth; in four months the trees were in full leaf, and the branches were thickly entwined; the little birds began to sing, so that the woods echoed, and the blossoms fell from the trees; when the fifth month had passed the wife stood under the almond tree, and it smelt so sweet that her heart leaped within her, and she fell on her knees for joy; and when the sixth month had gone, the fruit was thick and fine, and she remained still; and the seventh month she gathered the almonds, and ate them eagerly, and was sick and sorrowful; and when the eighth month had passed she called to her husband, and said, weeping, "If I die, bury me under the almond tree." Then she was comforted and happy until the ninth month had passed, and then she bore a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she saw it her joy was so great that she died.

Her husband buried her under the almond tree, and he wept sore; time passed, and he became less sad; and after he had grieved a little more he left off, and then he took another wife.

His second wife bore him a daughter, and his first wife's child was a son, as red as blood and as white as snow. Whenever the wife looked at her daughter she felt great love for her, but whenever she looked at the little boy, evil thoughts came into her heart, of how she could get all her husband's money for her daughter, and how the boy stood in the way; and so she took great hatred to him, and drove him from one corner to another, and gave him a buffet here and a cuff there, so that the poor child was always in disgrace; when he came back after school hours there was no peace for him. Once, when the wife went into the room upstairs, her little daughter followed her, and said, "Mother, give me an apple." - "Yes, my child," said the mother, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, and the chest had a great heavy lid with a strong iron lock. "Mother," said the little girl, "shall not my brother have one too?" That was what the mother expected, and she said, "Yes, when he comes back from school." And when she saw from the window that he was coming, an evil thought crossed her mind, and she snatched the apple, and took it from her little daughter, saying, "You shall not have it before your brother." Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut to the lid. Then the little boy came in at the door, and she said to him in a kind tone, but with evil looks, "My son, will you have an apple?" - "Mother," said the boy, "how terrible you look! yes, give me an apple!" Then she spoke as kindly as before, holding up the cover of the chest, "Come here and take out one for yourself." And as the boy was stooping over the open chest, crash went the lid down, so that his head flew off among the red apples. But then the woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. And she went to the chest of drawers in her bedroom and took a white handkerchief out of the nearest drawer, and fitting the head to the neck, she bound them with the handkerchief, so that nothing should be seen, and set him on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

Then came little Marjory into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing before the fire stirring a pot of hot water. "Mother," said Marjory, "my brother is sitting before the door and he has an apple in his hand, and looks very pale; I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me; it seems very strange." - "Go again to him," said the mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marjory went again and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But as he took no notice, she gave him a box on the ear, and his head fell off, at which she was greatly terrified, and began to cry and scream, and ran to her mother, and said, "O mother.1 I have knocked my brother's head off!" and cried and screamed, and would not cease. "O Marjory!" said her mother, "what have you done? but keep quiet, that no one may see there is anything the matter; it can't be helped now; we will put him out of the way safely."

When the father came home and sat down to table, he said, "Where is my son?" But the mother was filling a great dish full of black broth, and Marjory was crying bitterly, for she could not refrain. Then the father said again, "Where is my son?" - "Oh," said the mother, "he is gone into the country to his great-uncle's to stay for a little while." - "What should he go for?" said the father, "and without bidding me good-bye, too!" - "Oh, he wanted to go so much, and he asked me to let him stay there six weeks; he will be well taken care of." - "Dear me," said the father, "I am quite sad about it; it was not right of him to go without bidding me good-bye." With that he began to eat, saying, "Marjory, what are you crying for? Your brother will come back some time." After a while he said, "Well, wife, the food is very good; give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted, until he had eaten it all up, and be threw the bones under the table. Then Marjory went to her chest of drawers, and took one of her best handkerchiefs from the bottom drawer, and picked up all the bones from under the table and tied them up in her handkerchief, and went out at the door crying bitterly. She laid them in the green grass under the almond tree, and immediately her heart grew light again, and she wept no more. Then the almond tree began to wave to and fro, and the boughs drew together and then parted, just like a clapping of hands for joy; then a cloud rose from the tree, and in the midst of the cloud there burned a fire, and out of the fire a beautiful bird arose, and, singing most sweetly, soared high into the air; and when he had flown away, the almond tree remained as it was before, but the handkerchief full of bones was gone. Marjory felt quite glad and light-hearted, just as if her brother were still alive. So she went back merrily into the house and had her dinner. The bird, when it flew away, perched on the roof of a goldsmith's house, and began to sing,

''It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

The goldsmith was sitting in his shop making a golden chain, and when he heard the bird, who was sitting on his roof and singing, he started up to go and look, and as he passed over his threshold he lost one of his slippers; and he went into the middle of the street with a slipper on one foot and-only a sock on the other; with his apron on, and the gold chain in one hand and the pincers in the other; and so he stood in the sunshine looking up at the bird. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I do not sing for nothing twice; if you will give me that gold chain I will sing again." - "Very well," said the goldsmith, "here is the gold chain; now do as you said." Down came the bird and took the gold chain in his right claw, perched in front of the goldsmith, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

Then the bird flew to a shoemaker's, and perched on his roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

When the shoemaker heard, he ran out of his door in his shirt sleeves and looked up at the roof of his house, holding his hand to shade his eyes from the sun. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called in at his door, "Wife, come out directly; here is a bird singing beautifully; only listen." Then he called his daughter, all his children, and acquaintance, both young men and maidens, and they came up the street and gazed on the bird, and saw how beautiful it was with red and green feathers, and round its throat was as it were gold, and its eyes twinkled in its head like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing for nothing twice; you must give me something." - "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop; on the top shelf stands a pair of red shoes; bring them here." So the wife went and brought the shoes. "Now bird," said the man, "sing us that piece again." And the bird came down and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew up again to the roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I ciy,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished he flew away, with the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left claw, and he flew till he reached a mill, and the mill went "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And in the mill sat twenty millers-men hewing a millstone- "hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack," while the mill was going "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And the bird perched on a linden tree that stood in front of the mill, and sang, "It was my mother who murdered me; " Here one of the men looked up. "It was my father who ate of me;" Then two more looked up and listened. "It was my sister Marjory " Here four more looked up. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Now there were only eight left hewing. "And laid them under the almond tree." Now only five. "Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry," Now only one. "Oh what a beautiful bird am I!" At length the last one left off, and he only heard the end. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; let me hear it all; sing that again!" - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing it twice for nothing; if you will give me the millstone I will sing it again." - "Indeed," said the man, "if it belonged to me alone you should have it." - "All right," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers heaved up the stone with poles - "yo! heave-ho! yo! heave-ho!" and the bird stuck his head through the hole in the middle, and with the millstone round his neck he flew up to the tree and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished, he spread his wings,, having in the right claw the chain, and in the left claw the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew away to his father's house.

In the parlour sat the father, the mother, and Marjory at the table; the father said, "How light-hearted and cheerful I feel." - "Nay," said the mother, "I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming." But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof "Oh," said the father, "I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend." - "Nay," said the wife, "I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veins," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang, '' It was my mother who murdered me; " And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning. "It was my father who ate of me;'' "O mother!" said the-father, "there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon. ''It was my sister Marjory " Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said, "I must go out to see the bird." - "Oh do not go!" said the wife, "I feel as if the house were on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, "Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me." Then his wife was so terrified that she fell all along on the floor, and her cap came off. Then the bird began again to sing, "It was my mother who murdered me;" - "Oh," groaned the mother, "that I were a thousand fathoms under ground, so as not to be obliged to hear it." - "It was my father who ate of me;" Then the woman lay as if she were dead. "It was my sister Marjory " - "Oh," said Marjory, "I will go out, too, and see if the bird will give me anything." And so she went. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Then he threw the shoes down to her. "And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And poor Marjory all at once felt happy and joyful, and put on her red shoes, and danced and jumped for joy. "Oh dear," said she, "I felt so sad before I went outside, and now my heart is so light! He is a charming bird to have given me a pair of red shoes." But the mother's hair stood on end, and looked like flame, and she said, "Even if the world is coming to an end, I must go out for a little relief." Just as she came outside the door, crash went the millstone on her head, and crushed her flat. The father and daughter rushed out, and saw smoke and flames of fire rise up; but when that had gone by, there stood the little brother; and he took his father and Marjory by the hand, and they felt very happy and content, and went indoors, and sat to the table, and had their dinner.
今はもうずいぶん昔、二千年は前ですが、金持ちの男がいました。妻は美しく信心深い人で、二人は心から愛し合っていました。しかし、二人には、とても欲しいと望んだけれども、子供ができませんでした。妻は昼も夜も子供をお授けくださいとお祈りしましたがそれでもだめでした。二人の家の前に中庭があり、そこには一本のビャクシンの木がありました。冬のある日、妻はその木の下に立ち、リンゴの皮をむいていましたが、そうしているうちに指を切り、血が雪に落ちました。「ああ」と妻は言い、すぐため息をついて、目の前の血を見て、とても惨めに思いました。「ああ、血のように赤く、雪のように白い子供がいたらいいのに」こうして話している間にとてもしあわせな気分になり、本当に子供が生まれるような気がし、それから家に入りました。

一か月経つと雪が消え、二か月すると一面緑になり、三か月経つと花が咲き、四か月すると森の木々の緑が濃くなり緑の枝が密にからみあい、鳥たちがさえずりその声が森にこだまし、花が木から落ちました。五カ月経って、妻はビャクシンの木の下に立ちました。その木はとても甘い香りがして妻の心が躍りました。妻は膝まづき、喜びに我を忘れました。六ヶ月目が終わるころ、実が大きくりっぱになってその時は妻はとても静かになりました。7ヶ月目にビャクシンの実をとってがつがつ食べましたが、その後、病気になり悲しそうでした。8ヶ月目が過ぎて、妻は夫を呼ぶと、「私が死んだら、ビャクシンの木の下に埋めてください。」と言いました。それから次の月が終わるころまで妻はとても安心して嬉しそうでした。それから雪のように白く、血のように赤い子供を生みました。その子を見た時妻はとても喜んだので死んでしまいました。

それで夫は妻をビャクシンの木の下に埋め、悲しんで泣き始めました。しばらく経つと、もっと楽になり、やはり泣きましたががまんできるようになりました。それからまたしばらくして、夫はまた妻をもらいました。

二番目の妻との間に娘が生まれましたが、最初の妻の子供は息子で、血のように赤く、雪のように白い子供でした。妻は自分の娘を見るとかわいくてしかたがありませんでしたが、男の子を見ると、心臓が切り裂かれるようでした。というのは、この子がいつも邪魔になるという思いがしたからでした。妻はどうしたら全財産を娘にやれるかといつも考えていました。また悪魔が妻の心をこういう思いでいっぱいにしたので、男の子を怒り、あっちのすみからこっちのすみへ押しのけ、あっちこっちひっぱたきました。それでとうとう可哀そうな子供はいつもおびえていました。というのは学校から帰ってくると、どこにも落ち着く場所がなかったからです。

ある日、妻は二階の自分の部屋にいると、娘もあがってきて、「おかあさん、りんごをちょうだい」といいました。「いいよ」と妻は言って、箱から立派なりんごを一つ渡しました。しかしその箱には大きな鋭い鉄の錠がついたとても重いふたがついていました。「おかあさん、おにいちゃんにも一つもらえない?」と娘がいいました。これを聞くと妻は怒りましたが、「いいよ、学校から帰ってきたらね。」と言いました。それで窓から子供が帰ってくるのが見えた時、悪魔が妻に入りこんだようで、りんごをひったくって娘からまたとりあげ、「お兄ちゃんより先にはりんごをもらえないよ。」と言いました。

それから妻はりんごを箱に投げ入れ、閉めました。それから男の子が戸口から入って来ると、悪魔にふきこまれて妻はやさしく男の子に言いました。「ねぇお前、りんごを食べるかい?」そして意地悪く男の子を見ました。「おかあさん」と小さな男の子は言いました。「なんて怖い顔。うん、りんごをちょうだい。」すると妻は男の子に言わなくてはいけないように思われました。「一緒においで。」妻は箱のふたを開け、「自分でりんごをとりなさい。」と言いました。小さい男の子が箱の中にかがみこんでいる間に悪魔が妻をそそのかしました。バタン。妻はふたを閉めました。子供の頭がポーンと飛び、赤いリンゴの間に落ちました。すると妻はとても恐ろしくなり、「私のしわざだと思わせないようにしなくちゃ」と考えました。それで二階の自分の部屋に行き、箪笥の一番上の引出しから白いハンカチをとり、首に頭をのせ、何も見えないようにハンカチを巻きました。それから男の子を戸の前の椅子に座らせ、手にりんごを持たせました。

このあと、マルリンヒェンが台所の母親のところにきました。母親は自分の前のお湯を入れた鍋をずっとかきまわし火のそばに立っていました。「お母さん」とマルリンヒェンは言いました。「お兄ちゃんが戸口のところに座っていて、真っ青な顔で手にりんごを持ってるの。りんごをちょうだいと頼んでも返事をしなかったわ。とても怖かったわ。」「お兄ちゃんのところにお戻り。」と母親は言いました。「それで返事をしないんなら、横っ面をなぐってやりなさい。」それでマルリンヒェンは兄のところに行き、「お兄ちゃん、りんごをちょうだい」と言いました。しかし兄は何も言わないので、マルリンヒェンは横っ面をはたきました。すると兄の頭がとれて落ちました。マルリンヒェンはおびえて、泣きだしわあわあ泣きました。母親のところへ走っていき、「ああん、お母さん、わたし、お兄ちゃんの頭をたたき落しちゃた~」と言い、泣いて泣いて、泣き止みませんでした。「マルリンヒェン」と母親は言いました。「なんてことをしたの。だけど、泣くのはおやめ。誰にも知らせないんだよ。もうしかたがないよ。あの子を黒ソーセージにしよう。」それから母親は小さな男の子を持って来て、細かく切り、鍋に入れて黒ソーセージを作りました。しかし、マルリンヒェンはそばに立ってひたすら泣いていて、その涙がみんな鍋に入り、塩が必要ありませんでした。

そのあと、父親が帰ってきて、食卓につき、「だけど息子はどこだ?」と言いました。母親は大きな皿の黒ソーセージを食卓にだし、マルリンヒェンは泣いて泣き止むことができませんでした。それで父親はまた「だけど息子はどこなんだ?」と言いました。「ああ、それね」と母親は言いました。「向こうの、母親の大叔父さんのところにいったわよ。しばらくそこにいるって。」「そこで何をするつもりなんだ?おれに行ってきますとも言わなかったぞ。」

「あら、あの子は行きたかったのよ。私に6週間泊ってもいいかと聞いてたわ。あっちでよく世話してくれるわよ。」「ああ」と父親は言いました。「何か変な気がして、いい気分じゃないな。あの子はおれに当然行ってきますと言う筈なんだがな。」そう言って、父親は食べ出し、「マルリンヒェン、どうして泣いてるんだ?兄ちゃんはきっと帰ってくるさ。」と言いました。それから「なあ、お前、こいつはうまいな。もっとくれよ。」と言いました。それで食べれば食べるほど、もっと欲しくなり、「もっとくれよ。お前たちは食べるな。なんだか全部おれのもののような気がするんだ。」と言いました。そして、食べに食べて、骨を全部テーブルの下に投げ、とうとう全部食べてしまいました。

しかし、マルリンヒェンは自分の箪笥へ行って一番下の引出しから一番いい絹のハンカチをとってきて、テーブルの下から、骨を全部拾い集め、絹のハンカチに入れて、血が出るほど泣きながら戸口の外へ持って行きました。それからビャクシンの木の下の緑の草の上に骨を置きました。そこに骨を置いてしまったら、急に心が軽くなり、もう泣きませんでした。するとビャクシンの木が動き出し、まるで誰かが喜んで手をたたくように、枝が分かれ、また閉じました。同時に木から霧が上っているように見え、この霧の真ん中が火のように燃え、その火から素晴らしい声で鳴きながら美しい鳥が飛び立ちました。その鳥は空高く飛んで行き、行ってしまうとビャクシンの木は前と全く同じになり、骨の入ったハンカチはもうそこにありませんでした。しかし、マルリンヒェンは兄がまだ生きているかのように明るくうれしくなりました。そして楽しそうに家に入り、食卓に座って食べました。

しかし鳥は飛んでいって、金細工師の家にとまり、鳴きだしました。「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した、僕の父さん、僕を食べた、僕の妹、マルリンヒェン、僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

金細工師は、金の鎖を作りながら作業場にいました。自分の家の屋根にとまってさえずっている鳥をきいたとき、その歌がとても美しく思われました。立ちあがりましたが、敷居をまたいだとき上履きが片方ぬげました。しかし片方の靴と片方の靴下のまま道の真ん中まででていきました。エプロンをつけたまま、片手に金の鎖を握りもう一方の手には鋏を持っていました。太陽がとても明るく通りに照っていました。それでまっすぐ進んで行って立ち止まり、鳥に言いました。「鳥よ」それから「なんてきれいな歌だ。もう一回歌ってくれないか。」と言いました。「だめだよ。」と鳥は言いました。「ただでは2回歌わないよ。金の鎖をおくれ。そうしたらもう一回歌ってあげる。」「ほら」と金細工師は言いました。「金の鎖をあげるよ。さあ、あの歌を歌ってくれ。」それで鳥はやってきて、右の爪で鎖をとり、金細工師の前に行ってとまり歌いました。

「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した、僕の父さん、僕を食べた、僕の妹、マルリンヒェン、僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

それから鳥は靴屋に飛んで行き、その家の屋根にとまり歌いました。

「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した、僕の父さん、僕を食べた、僕の妹、マルリンヒェン、僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

靴屋はそれを聞き、シャツを着たまま戸口の外へ走り出て、屋根を見上げ、太陽がまぶしいので目の上に手をかざさなければなりませんでした。「鳥よ」と靴屋は言いました。「なんてきれいな歌だ。」それから入り口から中へ叫びました。「お前、外へ出て来いよ。鳥がいるんだ。あの鳥を見てみろ。歌がうまいんだ。」それから娘や子供たち、職人、女中や下男、みんなが通りに来て、鳥を見て、その鳥が、なんと美しいか、なんと素晴らしい赤と緑の羽をしているか、首が本当の金のようで目が星のようにかがやいている、とわかりました。「鳥よ」と靴屋は言いました。「さあ、もう一回歌っておくれ」「いやだ」と鳥は言いました。「ただで2回うたわないよ。なにかくれなければいけないよ。」「お前」と靴屋はかみさんに言いました。「屋根裏部屋に行って、一番上の棚に赤い靴があるから、もってこいよ。」それでおかみさんが行って靴を持ってきました。「ほら、やるよ」と靴屋は言いました。「さあ、もう一回歌ってくれ。」それで鳥はやってきて、靴を左の爪でとり、屋根に飛んで戻り歌いました。

「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した、僕の父さん、僕を食べた、僕の妹、マルリンヒェン、僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

歌い終わると鳥はとんでいきました。右の爪には鎖を持ち、左の爪には靴をもって、遠くの水車小屋まで飛んで行きました。水車がガッタン、ゴットン、ガッタン、ゴットンと回り、水車小屋の中に石をきりながら、粉屋の男たちが20人いました。石切りの音がヒク、ハク、ヒク、ハク、水車がガッタン、ゴットン、ガッタン、ゴットン。それから鳥は水車小屋の前にある菩提樹に行ってとまり、歌いました。

「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した」すると一人の男が仕事をやめました。「僕の父さん、僕を食べた」するともう二人が仕事をやめ、その歌に耳を傾けました。「僕の妹、マルリンヒェン」するともう四人がやめました。「僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み」もう8人しか切っていなくなりました。「ビャクシンの木の下に」もうたった5人だけになりました。「置いた」もう一人だけになりました。「キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

それで最後の男も仕事をやめて、最後の言葉を聞きました。「鳥よ」と男は言いました。「何てきれいな歌だ。おれにも聞かせてくれ。もう一度おれに歌ってくれ。」「だめだよ」と鳥は言いました。「ただでは2回歌わないよ。その石うすをおくれ。そうしたらもう一回歌ってあげる。」「いいよ」と男は言いました。「おれだけのものなら、あげるんだがね」「いいよ」と他の男たちがいいました。「もう一回歌うなら、やれよ。」それで鳥は降りてきて、20人の男たちみんなが角材を使って石を立ち上げ、鳥は穴に首を入れて、服のえりのように石をのせて、また木に飛んで行って歌いました。

「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した、僕の父さん、僕を食べた、僕の妹、マルリンヒェン、僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

歌い終わると、鳥は翼を広げ、右の爪には鎖を持ち、左の爪には靴をもち、首のまわりに石うすをかけて、はるか遠く父親の家へ飛んで行きました。

部屋では、父親と母親とマルリンヒェンが食卓についていました。父親が、「なんて気が軽くて、楽しい気分なんだ。」と言いました。「いいえ」と母親は言いました。「とても不安な気分だわ。まるで嵐がくるみたい。」しかし、マルリンヒェンはただ泣いてばかりいました。そのとき鳥が飛んできました。屋根にとまったので父親が「ああ、本当に嬉しい気持ちだ。外では太陽がとても美しく照っているし、昔の友達にまた会うような気分だ。」と言いました。「いいえ」と母親は言いました。「私はとても心配。歯がガチガチするし、血管の中で火が燃えてるみたい。」母親は胴着をばっと広げました。しかしマルリンヒェンは泣きながらすみに座り、目の前に皿を置き、あまり泣いてその皿がすっかりぬれてしまいました。

それから鳥はビャクシンの木にとまり歌いました。「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した」すると母親は耳をふさぎ、目を閉じて見ようとも聞こうともしませんでしたが、暴風雨のように耳の中でごうごうとなり、目は燃えて稲妻のように光りました。「僕の父さん、僕を食べた」「なあ、母さん、あれはきれいな鳥だ。とても素晴らしく歌うよ。太陽がとても暖かく照って、シナモンのようなにおいがするよ。」と父親は言いました。「僕の妹、マルリンヒェン」するとマルリンヒェンは頭を膝にのせ泣き続けました。しかし父親は「外にでよう。もっと近くであの鳥を見なくては」と言いました。「ああ、行かないで。私は家が揺れて火事みたいに感じる。」と母親は言いました。しかし、父親は外に出て鳥を見ました。「僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み、ビャクシンの木の下に置いた、キーウィット、キーウィット、僕はなんてきれいな鳥だ」

こう歌って鳥は金の鎖を落とし、それはちょうど父親の首のまわりに落ち、全くちょうど首のまわりにきたので、よく似合いました。それで父親は中に入り、「どんなに素敵な鳥かちょっと見てごらん。それになんときれいな金の鎖をくれたんだ。とてもきれいな鳥だよ。」

しかし母親はこわがって、部屋の床に倒れ、帽子が頭から落ちました。すると鳥はもう一度歌いました。「ぼくのかあさん、僕を殺した」「それを聞かなくてすむように地中1000フィート下に行きたい」「僕の父さん、僕を食べた」すると母親は死んだようにまた倒れました。「僕の妹、マルリンヒェン」「ああ」とマルリンヒェンは言いました。「私も出て行って、鳥が何かくれるか見てみよう」そして出て行きました。「僕の骨を全部集め、絹のハンカチに包み」、そのとき鳥は妹に靴を落としました。すると、マルリンヒェンは気分が軽くなり嬉しくなりました。新しい赤い靴をはき、踊ったり跳ねたりして家に入りました。
「あら」と妹は言いました。「外へ出るときはあんなに悲しかったのに、今はとても気が軽いわ。あれは素晴らしい鳥だわ。私に赤い靴をくれたの。」「えっ」と母親は言って立ち上がり、髪の毛が炎のように逆立っていました。「まるで世界が終わりになるように感じるわ。私も外に出て気分が軽くなるか見てみよう。」

それで戸口から出ると、ドスン、鳥が母親の頭に石うすを投げ落としました。それで母親はぺちゃんこにつぶれてしまいました。父親とマルリンヒェンがその音を聞いて、外へでてみました。その場所から、煙と炎と火があがっていました。それがおわると、そこに兄が立っていて、父親とマルリンヒェンの手をとりました。三人はみんな嬉しくて、家に入り食卓について食べました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.