ENGLISH

The almond tree

NEDERLANDS

Van de wachtelboom


Long time ago, perhaps as much as two thousand years, there was a rich man, and he had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other very much, and they had no children, though they wished greatly for some, and the wife prayed for one day and night. Now, in the courtyard in front of their house stood an almond tree; and one day in winter the wife was standing beneath it, and paring an apple, and as she pared it she cut her finger, and the blood fell upon the snow. "Ah," said the woman, sighing deeply, and looking down at the blood, "if only I could have a child as red as blood, and as white as snow!" And as she said these words, her heart suddenly grew light, and she felt sure she should have her wish. So she went back to the house, and when a month had passed the snow was gone; in two months everything was green; in three months the flowers sprang out of the earth; in four months the trees were in full leaf, and the branches were thickly entwined; the little birds began to sing, so that the woods echoed, and the blossoms fell from the trees; when the fifth month had passed the wife stood under the almond tree, and it smelt so sweet that her heart leaped within her, and she fell on her knees for joy; and when the sixth month had gone, the fruit was thick and fine, and she remained still; and the seventh month she gathered the almonds, and ate them eagerly, and was sick and sorrowful; and when the eighth month had passed she called to her husband, and said, weeping, "If I die, bury me under the almond tree." Then she was comforted and happy until the ninth month had passed, and then she bore a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she saw it her joy was so great that she died.

Her husband buried her under the almond tree, and he wept sore; time passed, and he became less sad; and after he had grieved a little more he left off, and then he took another wife.

His second wife bore him a daughter, and his first wife's child was a son, as red as blood and as white as snow. Whenever the wife looked at her daughter she felt great love for her, but whenever she looked at the little boy, evil thoughts came into her heart, of how she could get all her husband's money for her daughter, and how the boy stood in the way; and so she took great hatred to him, and drove him from one corner to another, and gave him a buffet here and a cuff there, so that the poor child was always in disgrace; when he came back after school hours there was no peace for him. Once, when the wife went into the room upstairs, her little daughter followed her, and said, "Mother, give me an apple." - "Yes, my child," said the mother, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, and the chest had a great heavy lid with a strong iron lock. "Mother," said the little girl, "shall not my brother have one too?" That was what the mother expected, and she said, "Yes, when he comes back from school." And when she saw from the window that he was coming, an evil thought crossed her mind, and she snatched the apple, and took it from her little daughter, saying, "You shall not have it before your brother." Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut to the lid. Then the little boy came in at the door, and she said to him in a kind tone, but with evil looks, "My son, will you have an apple?" - "Mother," said the boy, "how terrible you look! yes, give me an apple!" Then she spoke as kindly as before, holding up the cover of the chest, "Come here and take out one for yourself." And as the boy was stooping over the open chest, crash went the lid down, so that his head flew off among the red apples. But then the woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. And she went to the chest of drawers in her bedroom and took a white handkerchief out of the nearest drawer, and fitting the head to the neck, she bound them with the handkerchief, so that nothing should be seen, and set him on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

Then came little Marjory into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing before the fire stirring a pot of hot water. "Mother," said Marjory, "my brother is sitting before the door and he has an apple in his hand, and looks very pale; I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me; it seems very strange." - "Go again to him," said the mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marjory went again and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But as he took no notice, she gave him a box on the ear, and his head fell off, at which she was greatly terrified, and began to cry and scream, and ran to her mother, and said, "O mother.1 I have knocked my brother's head off!" and cried and screamed, and would not cease. "O Marjory!" said her mother, "what have you done? but keep quiet, that no one may see there is anything the matter; it can't be helped now; we will put him out of the way safely."

When the father came home and sat down to table, he said, "Where is my son?" But the mother was filling a great dish full of black broth, and Marjory was crying bitterly, for she could not refrain. Then the father said again, "Where is my son?" - "Oh," said the mother, "he is gone into the country to his great-uncle's to stay for a little while." - "What should he go for?" said the father, "and without bidding me good-bye, too!" - "Oh, he wanted to go so much, and he asked me to let him stay there six weeks; he will be well taken care of." - "Dear me," said the father, "I am quite sad about it; it was not right of him to go without bidding me good-bye." With that he began to eat, saying, "Marjory, what are you crying for? Your brother will come back some time." After a while he said, "Well, wife, the food is very good; give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted, until he had eaten it all up, and be threw the bones under the table. Then Marjory went to her chest of drawers, and took one of her best handkerchiefs from the bottom drawer, and picked up all the bones from under the table and tied them up in her handkerchief, and went out at the door crying bitterly. She laid them in the green grass under the almond tree, and immediately her heart grew light again, and she wept no more. Then the almond tree began to wave to and fro, and the boughs drew together and then parted, just like a clapping of hands for joy; then a cloud rose from the tree, and in the midst of the cloud there burned a fire, and out of the fire a beautiful bird arose, and, singing most sweetly, soared high into the air; and when he had flown away, the almond tree remained as it was before, but the handkerchief full of bones was gone. Marjory felt quite glad and light-hearted, just as if her brother were still alive. So she went back merrily into the house and had her dinner. The bird, when it flew away, perched on the roof of a goldsmith's house, and began to sing,

''It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

The goldsmith was sitting in his shop making a golden chain, and when he heard the bird, who was sitting on his roof and singing, he started up to go and look, and as he passed over his threshold he lost one of his slippers; and he went into the middle of the street with a slipper on one foot and-only a sock on the other; with his apron on, and the gold chain in one hand and the pincers in the other; and so he stood in the sunshine looking up at the bird. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I do not sing for nothing twice; if you will give me that gold chain I will sing again." - "Very well," said the goldsmith, "here is the gold chain; now do as you said." Down came the bird and took the gold chain in his right claw, perched in front of the goldsmith, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

Then the bird flew to a shoemaker's, and perched on his roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

When the shoemaker heard, he ran out of his door in his shirt sleeves and looked up at the roof of his house, holding his hand to shade his eyes from the sun. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called in at his door, "Wife, come out directly; here is a bird singing beautifully; only listen." Then he called his daughter, all his children, and acquaintance, both young men and maidens, and they came up the street and gazed on the bird, and saw how beautiful it was with red and green feathers, and round its throat was as it were gold, and its eyes twinkled in its head like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing for nothing twice; you must give me something." - "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop; on the top shelf stands a pair of red shoes; bring them here." So the wife went and brought the shoes. "Now bird," said the man, "sing us that piece again." And the bird came down and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew up again to the roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I ciy,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished he flew away, with the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left claw, and he flew till he reached a mill, and the mill went "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And in the mill sat twenty millers-men hewing a millstone- "hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack," while the mill was going "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And the bird perched on a linden tree that stood in front of the mill, and sang, "It was my mother who murdered me; " Here one of the men looked up. "It was my father who ate of me;" Then two more looked up and listened. "It was my sister Marjory " Here four more looked up. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Now there were only eight left hewing. "And laid them under the almond tree." Now only five. "Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry," Now only one. "Oh what a beautiful bird am I!" At length the last one left off, and he only heard the end. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; let me hear it all; sing that again!" - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing it twice for nothing; if you will give me the millstone I will sing it again." - "Indeed," said the man, "if it belonged to me alone you should have it." - "All right," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers heaved up the stone with poles - "yo! heave-ho! yo! heave-ho!" and the bird stuck his head through the hole in the middle, and with the millstone round his neck he flew up to the tree and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished, he spread his wings,, having in the right claw the chain, and in the left claw the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew away to his father's house.

In the parlour sat the father, the mother, and Marjory at the table; the father said, "How light-hearted and cheerful I feel." - "Nay," said the mother, "I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming." But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof "Oh," said the father, "I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend." - "Nay," said the wife, "I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veins," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang, '' It was my mother who murdered me; " And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning. "It was my father who ate of me;'' "O mother!" said the-father, "there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon. ''It was my sister Marjory " Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said, "I must go out to see the bird." - "Oh do not go!" said the wife, "I feel as if the house were on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, "Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me." Then his wife was so terrified that she fell all along on the floor, and her cap came off. Then the bird began again to sing, "It was my mother who murdered me;" - "Oh," groaned the mother, "that I were a thousand fathoms under ground, so as not to be obliged to hear it." - "It was my father who ate of me;" Then the woman lay as if she were dead. "It was my sister Marjory " - "Oh," said Marjory, "I will go out, too, and see if the bird will give me anything." And so she went. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Then he threw the shoes down to her. "And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And poor Marjory all at once felt happy and joyful, and put on her red shoes, and danced and jumped for joy. "Oh dear," said she, "I felt so sad before I went outside, and now my heart is so light! He is a charming bird to have given me a pair of red shoes." But the mother's hair stood on end, and looked like flame, and she said, "Even if the world is coming to an end, I must go out for a little relief." Just as she came outside the door, crash went the millstone on her head, and crushed her flat. The father and daughter rushed out, and saw smoke and flames of fire rise up; but when that had gone by, there stood the little brother; and he took his father and Marjory by the hand, and they felt very happy and content, and went indoors, and sat to the table, and had their dinner.
Het is nu al lang geleden, wel twee duizend jaar. Toen was er een rijke man die een mooie vrome vrouw had en zij hielden heel veel van elkaar, maar zij hadden geen kinderen en zij wilden ze toch zo graag hebben; dag en nacht bad de vrouw erom, maar zij kregen en kregen er maar geen. Voor hun huis lag een erf, daarop stond een wachtelboom, en onder die boom stond de vrouw in de winter eens een appel te schillen en bij het schillen van die appel sneed zij zich in haar vinger en het bloed viel in de sneeuw. "Ach," zei de vrouw en zij zuchtte diep en zij keek naar het bloed daar voor zich en zij werd heel bedroefd, "had ik toch maar een kind, zo rood als bloed en zo wit als sneeuw. En terwijl zij dat zei, werd zij heel blij en zij had het gevoel dat het wat worden zou.

Toen liep zij naar huis en er ging een maand voorbij en de sneeuw smolt; en twee maanden, toen kwam het jonge groen; en de derde maand, toen kwamen de bloemen uit de aarde; en de vierde maand, toen kwamen de bladeren aan de bomen en de groene takken groeiden door elkaar heen, de vogeltjes zongen dat het door het hele bos schalde en de bloesems vielen van de bomen; toen was de vijfde maand om en zij stond onder de wachtelboom die heerlijk rook: en haar hart sprong op van vreugde en zij kon het niet laten op haar knieën te vallen; en toen de zesde maand voorbij was, werden de vruchten dik en stevig, toen werd zij heel stil; en de zevende maand, toen greep zij naar de wachtelbessen en at er gulzig van en zij werd treurig en ziek; toen ging de achtste maand voorbij en zij riep haar man en zei schreiend: "Wanneer ik sterf, begraaf mij dan onder de wachtelboom." Toen was zij weer getroost en zij kon weer blij zijn tot de negende maand voorbij was; toen kreeg zij een kind zo wit als sneeuw en zo rood als bloed en toen zij het zag was zij zo blij dat zij stierf. Toen begroef haar man haar onder de wachtelboom en hij begon hevig te wenen; na een poos werd het wat minder en nadat hij nog wat had geweend, hield hij op en nog een tijd later nam hij weer een vrouw. Bij de tweede vrouw kreeg hij een dochter, maar het kind van de eerste vrouw was een zoontje en het was zo rood als bloed en zo wit als sneeuw. Wanneer de vrouw naar haar dochter keek, hield zij heel veel van haar, maar keek ze naar het jongske, dan kreeg zij een steek in haar hart en het scheen haar toe dat hij haar overal in de weg stond en zij dacht er maar steeds aan, hoe zij het hele vermogen aan haar dochter kon geven en de Boze gaf haar in om het jongske heel slecht te behandelen, en zij duwde hem van de ene hoek naar de andere, en zij stompte hem hier en stompte hem daar, zodat het arme kind voortdurend in angst leefde. En wanneer hij uit school kwam, had hij geen rustig plekje.

Eens was de vrouw naar de opkamer gegaan, toen kwam het dochtertje ook naar boven en zei: "Moeder, geef mij een appel." - "Goed, mijn kind," zei de vrouw en zij gaf haar een mooie appel uit de kist; maar de kist had een groot zwaar deksel met een groot ijzeren slot. "Moeder," zei het dochtertje, "krijgt broer er ook één?" Dat verdroot de vrouw, maar zij zei: "Ja, als hij uit school komt." En toen zij uit het raam keek en hem zag aankomen, was het alsof de Boze over haar kwam en zij pakte haar dochter de appel weer af en zei: "Jij krijgt hem niet eerder dan broer." Toen gooide zij de appel in de kist en sloot de kist. Toen het jongske in de deur verscheen, gaf de Boze haar in vriendelijk tegen hem te zeggen: "Mijn zoon, wil je een appel?" En zij keek hem erg venijnig aan. "Moeder," zei het jongske, "wat zie je er griezelig uit! Ja, geef mij een appel." Toen was het haar, alsof zij tegen hem moest zeggen: "Kom mee," en zij maakte het deksel open, "haal hier maar een appel uit." En toen het jongske zich voorover boog, gaf de Boze haar weer iets in, en pats! sloeg zij het deksel dicht, zodat zijn hoofd eraf vloog en tussen de rode appels viel. Toen overviel haar de angst en zij dacht: Hoe kom ik hier onder uit. Toen ging zij naar boven naar haar kamer naar haar kleerkast, en haalde uit de bovenste la een witte doek en zij zette het hoofd weer op de hals en bond er de halsdoek zo omheen dat er niets meer van te zien was en zij zette hem voor de deur op een stoel en gaf hem de appel in de hand.

Daarna kwam Marleenke in de keuken, daar stond haar moeder bij het vuur en roerde onafgebroken in een pot heet water. "Moeder," zei Marleenke, "broer zit voor de deur en ziet erg wit en hij heeft een appel in zijn hand, ik heb hem gevraagd mij die appel te geven, maar hij geeft geen antwoord, ik vind het zo griezelig!" - "Ga maar weer naar hem toe," zei de moeder, "en als hij je geen antwoord wil geven, geef hem dan maar een draai om zijn oren." Toen liep Marleenke erheen en zei: "Broer, geef mij die appel." Maar hij zweeg, toen gaf zij hem een draai om zijn oren en toen viel het hoofd eraf, daar schrok zij hevig van en zij begon te huilen en te schreeuwen en zij liep naar haar moeder toe en zei: "Ach, moeder, ik heb mijn broer zijn hoofd afgeslagen," en zij weende en weende en kon maar niet tot bedaren komen. "Marleenke," zei de moeder, "wat heb je gedaan? Wees nu maar stil, dat geen mens er wat van merkt, er is nu toch niets meer aan te doen; wij zullen hem in azijn koken." Toen nam de moeder het jongske en hakte hem in stukken, deed die in de pot en kookte ze in azijn. Maar Marleenke stond erbij en weende en weende en de tranen vielen allemaal in de pot, en zij hoefden helemaal geen zout te gebruiken.

Toen kwam de vader thuis en ging aan tafel en zei: Waar blijft mijn zoon toch?" Toen diende de moeder een grote. grote schotel op met zwartzuur en Marleenke weende en kon niet ophouden. Toen zei de vader weer:

Waar blijft mijn zoon toch?" - "Ach," zei de moeder. tij is naar de oudoom van zijn moeder toegegaan, daar wil hij een poosje blijven. - Wat doet hij daar nu? Hij heeft mij niet eens goeiendag gezegd!" - "0, hij wilde er zo graag heen en heeft mij gevraagd, of hij daar wel zes weken zou mogen blijven, hij is daar wel goed onder dak." - "Ach," zei de man, "ik ben zo treurig, dat is toch niet in de haak, hij had mij toch goeiendag moeten zeggen." Meteen begon hij te eten en zei:

"Marleenke, waarom huil je zo? Broer komt toch weer terug!" - "Ach, vrouw," zei hij toen, "wat smaakt dat eten mij goed. Geef mij nog wat." En hoe meer hij at, des te meer wilde hij hebben en hij zei: "Geef mij nog meer, jullie mogen er niets van hebben, het is alsof dit allemaal van mij is." En hij at en at en de botjes gooide hij allemaal onder de tafel tot hij alles op had.

Maar Marleenke ging naar haar ladekastje en nam uit de onderste la haar beste zijden doek en haalde alle beentjes en botjes onder de tafel vandaan, bond ze in de zijden doek en bracht ze naar buiten en schreide bittere tranen. Daar legde zij ze onder de wachtelboom in het groene gras en toen zij ze daar had neergelegd, werd het haar opeens heel licht te moede en zij hield op met schreien. Toen begon de wachtelboom zich te bewegen, de takken bogen telkens uit elkaar en dan weer naar elkaar toe, net zoals iemand met zijn handen doet als hij heel blij is. Meteen steeg er nevel uit de boom op en middenin die nevel brandde het als vuur en uit dat vuur vloog een mooie vogel op die verrukkelijk zong en zich hoog in de lucht verhief, en toen hij weg was, was de wachtelboom weer net zoals tevoren en de doek met de botjes was weg. Marleenke voelde zich zo opgelucht en blij, alsof broer nog leefde en ging heel vrolijk naar huis terug en ging aan tafel zitten eten.

Maar de vogel vloog weg en streek neer op het huis van een goudsmid en begon te zingen:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte,
Mijn vader die mij at,
Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke,
Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

De goudsmid zat in zijn werkplaats een gouden ketting te maken; daar hoorde hij de vogel die op zijn dak zat te zingen en hij vond het heel mooi. Hij stond op en toen hij over de drempel stapte, verloor hij een pantoffel, en zo liep hij midden op straat met één pantoffel en één sok aan; zijn schootsvel had hij voor en in de ene hand hield hij de gouden ketting en in de andere de tang; en de zon scheen helder op de straat. Zo ging hij daar staan en keek naar de vogel. "Vogel," zegt hij, "wat kun jij mooi zingen! Zing dat wijsje nog eens voor mij." - "Nee," zegt de vogel, "ik zing geen twee liedjes voor niets. Geef mij de gouden ketting, dan zal ik het nog eens voor je zingen." - "Hier heb je de gouden ketting," zegt de goudsmid, "zing het nu nog eens voor mij." Toen kwam de vogel, nam de gouden ketting in zijn rechterpoot, ging voor de goudsmid zitten en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte,
Mijn vader die mij at,
Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke,
Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

Toen vloog de vogel weg naar een schoenmaker, streek neer op diens dak en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte,
Mijn vader die mij at,
Mijn zuster, lief Marleneke,
Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Leg die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

De schoenmaker hoorde het en liep in hemdsmouwen de deur uit, hij keek naar zijn dak en moest zijn hand voor zijn ogen houden opdat de zon hem niet zou verblinden. "Vogel," zei hij, "wat kun jij mooi zingen." Toen riep hij naar binnen: "Vrouw, kom eens buiten, daar zit een vogel. Kijk eens naar die vogel, die kan zo mooi zingen!" Toen riep hij zijn dochter en alle kinderen en gezellen, jongens en meisjes en zij liepen allemaal de straat op en keken naar de vogel en zij zagen hoe mooi hij was met zijn helderrode en groene veren, en om zijn hals leek hij wel van goud en zijn ogen blonken in zijn kop als sterren. "Vogel," zegt de schoenmaker, "zing dat wijsje nog eens voor mij." - "Neen," zegt de vogel, "ik zing geen twee liedjes voor niets, je moet me er wat voor geven." - "Vrouw, zegt de man, "ga naar de werkplaats, op de bovenste plank staan een paar rode schoenen, haal die eraf en breng ze hier." De vrouw liep erheen en haalde de schoenen. "Hier, vogel," zei de man, "zing nu dat wijsje nog eens voor mij." Toen kwam de vogel en nam de schoenen in zijn linkerklauw, vloog weer op het dak en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte,
Mijn vader die mij at,
Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke
Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

En toen hij was uitgezongen, vloog hij weg. De ketting had hij in zijn rechter- en de schoenen in zijn linkerklauw en hij vloog ver weg naar een molen, en de molen ging van "klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe." En in de molen zaten twintig molenaarsknechts een steen te hakken en ze hakten van "hik hak, hik hak, hik hak," en de molen ging van "klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe." Toen ging de vogel in een lindeboom zitten die voor de molen stond en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte."

toen hield er één op,

"Mijn vader die mij at,"

toen hielden er twee op en ze luisterden,

"Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke,"

toen hielden er nog vier op,

Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,"

nu hakten er nog maar acht,

"Legt die onder"

nu nog vijf,

"de wachtelboom."

nu nog maar één.

"Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

Toen hield ook de laatste op en die had het laatste nog net gehoord. "Vogel," zegt hij, "wat zing jij mooi! Laat mij dat ook eens horen, zing het nog eens voor mij." - "Neen," zegt de vogel, "ik zing geen twee liedjes voor niets, geef mij de molensteen, dan zal ik het nog eens zingen." - "Ja," zegt hij, "als hij aan mij alleen toebehoorde, zou je hem wel mogen hebben." - "Nou," zeiden de anderen, "als hij het nog eens zingt, mag hij hem hebben." Toen kwam de vogel naar beneden en de molenaars zaten alle twintig met hun voorschot aan en zij tilden de steen op: "Hoe-oe-oep, hoe-oe-oep, hoe-oe-oep!" Toen stak de vogel zijn hals door het gat, zodat hij de steen als een kraag omhad, vloog weer in de boom en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte,
Mijn vader die mij at,
Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke
Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

En toen hij was uitgezongen. spreidde hij zijn vleugels uit en in zijn rechterklauw droeg hij de ketting en in zijn linker de schoenen en om zijn hals droeg hij de molensteen, en hij vloog ver weg naar het huis van zijn vader. In de kamer zaten de vader, de moeder en Marleenke aan tafel en de vader zei: "0, ik krijg zo"n blij gevoel, ik voel me zo heerlijk." -"Neen," zei de moeder, "ik ben juist zo angstig alsof er zwaar weer op til is." Maar Marleenke zat te schreien en te schreien. Toen kwam de vogel aanvliegen en toen hij op het dak neerstreek, zei de vader: "0, wat ben ik blij en de zon schijnt buiten zo mooi; het is alsof ik een oude bekende terug zal zien. -"Neen," zei de vrouw, "ik ben zo bang, mijn tanden klapperen en het is alsof er vuur door mijn aderen stroomt." En zij rukte haar jakje open, maar Marleenke zat in een hoek te schreien en zij hield haar schort voor haar ogen en zij schreide haar schort kletsnat. Toen streek de vogel op de wachtelboom neer en zong:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte"

Toen hield de moeder haar oren dicht en kneep haar ogen toe en wilde niets horen en niets zien, maar het suisde in haar oren als de zwaarste storm en haar ogen brandden en er gingen flitsen doorheen als van de bliksem.

"Mijn vader die mij at"

"O, moeder," zegt de man, "daar is een mooie vogel, die zingt zo heerlijk en de zon schijnt zo warm en het ruikt naar zuiver kaneel."

"Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke"

Toen legde Marleenke haar hoofd op haar knieën en schreide aan één stuk door, maar de man zei: "Ik ga naar buiten, ik moet de vogel van dichtbij bekijken." - "Ach, ga toch niet," zei de vrouw, "het is mij alsof het hele huis heeft en in brand staat." Maar de man ging naar buiten en keek naar de vogel.

"Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek,
Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

Meteen liet de vogel de gouden ketting vallen en hij viel om de hals van de man en paste precies. Toen ging hij naar binnen en zei:

"Kijk eens, wat een mooie vogel dat is; hij heeft mij een mooie gouden ketting gegeven en hij ziet er zo mooi uit." Maar de vrouw werd zo angstig dat zij languit in de kamer op de grond viel en haar muts viel van haar hoofd. Toen zong de vogel weer:

"Mijn moeder die mij slachtte"

"Ach, zat ik maar duizend voet onder de grond, dat ik dat niet hoefde te horen!"

"Mijn vader die mij at"

Toen viel de vrouw als dood neer.

"Mijn zuster, lief Marleenke"

"Ach," zei Marleenke, "ik wil ook naar buiten gaan om te zien of de vogel mij iets schenkt." Toen ging zij naar buiten.

"Zoekt alle mijne beenderkens,
Bindt ze in een zijden doek."

Toen gooide hij haar de schoenen toe.

"Legt die onder de wachtelboom.
Kiewit, kiewit, wat een mooie vogel
ben ik!"

Toen werd het haar licht en blij te moede en zij trok de nieuwe rode schoenen aan en danste en sprong erin rond. "O," zei zij, "ik was zo treurig toen ik naar buiten ging en nu voel ik mij zo licht; wat een heerlijke vogel is dat, hij heeft mij een paar rode schoenen gegeven." - "Nee," zei de vrouw en zij sprong op en haar haren rezen te berge als vurige vlammen, "het lijkt mij, alsof de wereld zal vergaan, ik wil ook naar buiten, misschien wordt het mij dan lichter te moede." En toen zij de deur uitkwam, pats! smeet de vogel de molensteen op haar hoofd, zodat zij helemaal verpletterd werd. De vader en Marleenke hoorden dat en liepen naar buiten. Toen stegen nevel en vlammen en vuur van die plek op en toen dat voorbij was, stond het broerke daar en hij nam zijn vader en Marleenke bij de hand en zij waren alle drie heel gelukkig en zij liepen het huis binnen en gingen aan tafel zitten eten.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.