ENGLISH

The almond tree

中文

桧树


Long time ago, perhaps as much as two thousand years, there was a rich man, and he had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other very much, and they had no children, though they wished greatly for some, and the wife prayed for one day and night. Now, in the courtyard in front of their house stood an almond tree; and one day in winter the wife was standing beneath it, and paring an apple, and as she pared it she cut her finger, and the blood fell upon the snow. "Ah," said the woman, sighing deeply, and looking down at the blood, "if only I could have a child as red as blood, and as white as snow!" And as she said these words, her heart suddenly grew light, and she felt sure she should have her wish. So she went back to the house, and when a month had passed the snow was gone; in two months everything was green; in three months the flowers sprang out of the earth; in four months the trees were in full leaf, and the branches were thickly entwined; the little birds began to sing, so that the woods echoed, and the blossoms fell from the trees; when the fifth month had passed the wife stood under the almond tree, and it smelt so sweet that her heart leaped within her, and she fell on her knees for joy; and when the sixth month had gone, the fruit was thick and fine, and she remained still; and the seventh month she gathered the almonds, and ate them eagerly, and was sick and sorrowful; and when the eighth month had passed she called to her husband, and said, weeping, "If I die, bury me under the almond tree." Then she was comforted and happy until the ninth month had passed, and then she bore a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she saw it her joy was so great that she died.

Her husband buried her under the almond tree, and he wept sore; time passed, and he became less sad; and after he had grieved a little more he left off, and then he took another wife.

His second wife bore him a daughter, and his first wife's child was a son, as red as blood and as white as snow. Whenever the wife looked at her daughter she felt great love for her, but whenever she looked at the little boy, evil thoughts came into her heart, of how she could get all her husband's money for her daughter, and how the boy stood in the way; and so she took great hatred to him, and drove him from one corner to another, and gave him a buffet here and a cuff there, so that the poor child was always in disgrace; when he came back after school hours there was no peace for him. Once, when the wife went into the room upstairs, her little daughter followed her, and said, "Mother, give me an apple." - "Yes, my child," said the mother, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, and the chest had a great heavy lid with a strong iron lock. "Mother," said the little girl, "shall not my brother have one too?" That was what the mother expected, and she said, "Yes, when he comes back from school." And when she saw from the window that he was coming, an evil thought crossed her mind, and she snatched the apple, and took it from her little daughter, saying, "You shall not have it before your brother." Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut to the lid. Then the little boy came in at the door, and she said to him in a kind tone, but with evil looks, "My son, will you have an apple?" - "Mother," said the boy, "how terrible you look! yes, give me an apple!" Then she spoke as kindly as before, holding up the cover of the chest, "Come here and take out one for yourself." And as the boy was stooping over the open chest, crash went the lid down, so that his head flew off among the red apples. But then the woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. And she went to the chest of drawers in her bedroom and took a white handkerchief out of the nearest drawer, and fitting the head to the neck, she bound them with the handkerchief, so that nothing should be seen, and set him on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

Then came little Marjory into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing before the fire stirring a pot of hot water. "Mother," said Marjory, "my brother is sitting before the door and he has an apple in his hand, and looks very pale; I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me; it seems very strange." - "Go again to him," said the mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marjory went again and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But as he took no notice, she gave him a box on the ear, and his head fell off, at which she was greatly terrified, and began to cry and scream, and ran to her mother, and said, "O mother.1 I have knocked my brother's head off!" and cried and screamed, and would not cease. "O Marjory!" said her mother, "what have you done? but keep quiet, that no one may see there is anything the matter; it can't be helped now; we will put him out of the way safely."

When the father came home and sat down to table, he said, "Where is my son?" But the mother was filling a great dish full of black broth, and Marjory was crying bitterly, for she could not refrain. Then the father said again, "Where is my son?" - "Oh," said the mother, "he is gone into the country to his great-uncle's to stay for a little while." - "What should he go for?" said the father, "and without bidding me good-bye, too!" - "Oh, he wanted to go so much, and he asked me to let him stay there six weeks; he will be well taken care of." - "Dear me," said the father, "I am quite sad about it; it was not right of him to go without bidding me good-bye." With that he began to eat, saying, "Marjory, what are you crying for? Your brother will come back some time." After a while he said, "Well, wife, the food is very good; give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted, until he had eaten it all up, and be threw the bones under the table. Then Marjory went to her chest of drawers, and took one of her best handkerchiefs from the bottom drawer, and picked up all the bones from under the table and tied them up in her handkerchief, and went out at the door crying bitterly. She laid them in the green grass under the almond tree, and immediately her heart grew light again, and she wept no more. Then the almond tree began to wave to and fro, and the boughs drew together and then parted, just like a clapping of hands for joy; then a cloud rose from the tree, and in the midst of the cloud there burned a fire, and out of the fire a beautiful bird arose, and, singing most sweetly, soared high into the air; and when he had flown away, the almond tree remained as it was before, but the handkerchief full of bones was gone. Marjory felt quite glad and light-hearted, just as if her brother were still alive. So she went back merrily into the house and had her dinner. The bird, when it flew away, perched on the roof of a goldsmith's house, and began to sing,

''It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

The goldsmith was sitting in his shop making a golden chain, and when he heard the bird, who was sitting on his roof and singing, he started up to go and look, and as he passed over his threshold he lost one of his slippers; and he went into the middle of the street with a slipper on one foot and-only a sock on the other; with his apron on, and the gold chain in one hand and the pincers in the other; and so he stood in the sunshine looking up at the bird. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I do not sing for nothing twice; if you will give me that gold chain I will sing again." - "Very well," said the goldsmith, "here is the gold chain; now do as you said." Down came the bird and took the gold chain in his right claw, perched in front of the goldsmith, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

Then the bird flew to a shoemaker's, and perched on his roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

When the shoemaker heard, he ran out of his door in his shirt sleeves and looked up at the roof of his house, holding his hand to shade his eyes from the sun. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called in at his door, "Wife, come out directly; here is a bird singing beautifully; only listen." Then he called his daughter, all his children, and acquaintance, both young men and maidens, and they came up the street and gazed on the bird, and saw how beautiful it was with red and green feathers, and round its throat was as it were gold, and its eyes twinkled in its head like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "do sing that piece over again." - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing for nothing twice; you must give me something." - "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop; on the top shelf stands a pair of red shoes; bring them here." So the wife went and brought the shoes. "Now bird," said the man, "sing us that piece again." And the bird came down and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew up again to the roof, and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
hem in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I ciy,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished he flew away, with the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left claw, and he flew till he reached a mill, and the mill went "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And in the mill sat twenty millers-men hewing a millstone- "hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack," while the mill was going "clip-clap, clip-clap, clip-clap." And the bird perched on a linden tree that stood in front of the mill, and sang, "It was my mother who murdered me; " Here one of the men looked up. "It was my father who ate of me;" Then two more looked up and listened. "It was my sister Marjory " Here four more looked up. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Now there were only eight left hewing. "And laid them under the almond tree." Now only five. "Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry," Now only one. "Oh what a beautiful bird am I!" At length the last one left off, and he only heard the end. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing; let me hear it all; sing that again!" - "No," said the bird, "I may not sing it twice for nothing; if you will give me the millstone I will sing it again." - "Indeed," said the man, "if it belonged to me alone you should have it." - "All right," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers heaved up the stone with poles - "yo! heave-ho! yo! heave-ho!" and the bird stuck his head through the hole in the middle, and with the millstone round his neck he flew up to the tree and sang,

"It was my mother who murdered me;
It was my father who ate of me;
It was my sister Marjory
Who all my bones in pieces found;
Them in a handkerchief she bound,
And laid them under the almond tree.
Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And when he had finished, he spread his wings,, having in the right claw the chain, and in the left claw the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew away to his father's house.

In the parlour sat the father, the mother, and Marjory at the table; the father said, "How light-hearted and cheerful I feel." - "Nay," said the mother, "I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming." But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof "Oh," said the father, "I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend." - "Nay," said the wife, "I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veins," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang, '' It was my mother who murdered me; " And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning. "It was my father who ate of me;'' "O mother!" said the-father, "there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon. ''It was my sister Marjory " Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said, "I must go out to see the bird." - "Oh do not go!" said the wife, "I feel as if the house were on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, "Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me." Then his wife was so terrified that she fell all along on the floor, and her cap came off. Then the bird began again to sing, "It was my mother who murdered me;" - "Oh," groaned the mother, "that I were a thousand fathoms under ground, so as not to be obliged to hear it." - "It was my father who ate of me;" Then the woman lay as if she were dead. "It was my sister Marjory " - "Oh," said Marjory, "I will go out, too, and see if the bird will give me anything." And so she went. "Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound," Then he threw the shoes down to her. "And laid them under the almond tree. Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry, Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"

And poor Marjory all at once felt happy and joyful, and put on her red shoes, and danced and jumped for joy. "Oh dear," said she, "I felt so sad before I went outside, and now my heart is so light! He is a charming bird to have given me a pair of red shoes." But the mother's hair stood on end, and looked like flame, and she said, "Even if the world is coming to an end, I must go out for a little relief." Just as she came outside the door, crash went the millstone on her head, and crushed her flat. The father and daughter rushed out, and saw smoke and flames of fire rise up; but when that had gone by, there stood the little brother; and he took his father and Marjory by the hand, and they felt very happy and content, and went indoors, and sat to the table, and had their dinner.
大概是在二千年以前吧,有一个富人对自己的妻子非常爱护,夫妻俩相亲相爱,生活非常幸福,遗憾的是他们一直没有小孩。 他们的房屋前有一座花园,里面有一棵高大的桧树。 一年冬天,外面下起了大雪,大地披上了白色的银装,妻子站在桧树下,一边欣赏着雪景,一边削着苹果,一不留神,小刀切到了手指头,滴滴鲜血流出来洒在了雪地上。 看着白雪衬托着的鲜红血点,她深深地叹了一口气说道:"唉--!要是我有一个孩子,他的皮肤像雪一般的白嫩,又透着血一样的红润,我该是多么的幸福啊!"说着想着,她的心情变得兴奋起来,仿佛自己的愿望真的就要成为现实一样。
冬天过去了,春风吹来,卸去了披在大地身上的银装,又给她换上了绿色的外套,朵朵鲜花点缀着翠绿的田野;当树木吐露出春芽时,嫩枝又开始被拂去枝头的残花,小鸟在树丛间欢快地飞来跳去,唱着赞美春天的歌声。 面对这生机盎然的大自然,富人的妻子满怀希望,心中充满了喜悦。 初夏来临,温暖的阳光又催开了桧树的花蕾,和暖的夏风夹带着丝丝甜意的花香飘进了她的房中。 花香使她心情激荡,心跳不已。 她来到桧树下,欣喜地跪在地上,虔诚地默默祈祷着。 秋天快到了,当树枝上挂满累累果实的时候,她从桧树上采下色泽深红的干果。 不知为什么,她此时的心情显得非常悲哀而伤心。 她叫来丈夫对他说:"如果我死了,就把我埋在这桧树下吧。"不久,她生下了一个非常漂亮的儿子,孩子长得正如她所希望的一样,真是白里透红、红中透粉。 看见自己可爱的孩子,她心里充满了快乐,再也支持不住生产的痛苦,慢慢地垂下脑袋,离开了自己的丈夫和刚生下的孩子。
丈夫按照她的愿望把她埋在了桧树下,痛哭着哀悼她的去世。 过了一段时间,他心情平静了一些,眼泪也少多了。 又过了一段时间,他的眼泪完全没有了,再过了一段时间,他娶了另外一个妻子。
时光流逝,第二个妻子生了一个女儿,她非常呵护这个女儿,但前妻生下的儿子长得越来越惹人喜爱,像雪一样的白嫩 ,透着血一般的红润。 她看见这个孩子就充满了仇恨,认为有了他,她和自己的女儿就得不到丈夫的全部财富了。 所以,她对这个可怜的孩子百般苛待,经常虐待他,把他从屋子里的一个角落推搡到另一个角落,一会儿给他一拳头,过一会儿又拧他一下,他身上尽是青红紫绿的瘀伤。 他从学校放学回来,往往一进屋就没有安宁的地方可待,这使他看见继母就害怕。
有一次,小女孩的母亲要到贮藏室去,她赶上妈妈说道:"妈妈,我可以吃一个苹果吗?"妈妈回答说:"好的!我的小乖乖。"说完,她从箱子里拿出一个鲜艳的红苹果给了她。 这个箱子的盖子非常沉重,上面有一把锋利的大铁卡子。 小女孩接过苹果说道:"妈妈,再给我一个,我要拿给小哥哥去吃。"她妈妈听了心里很不高兴,但嘴里却说道:"好吧,我的宝贝!等他放学回来后,我同样会给他一个的。"说着这话,她从窗子里看见小男孩正好回来了,马上从女儿手中夺回苹果,扔进箱子,关上盖子对女儿说:"等哥哥回来以后,再一起吃吧。"
小男孩走进家门,这个阴险的女人用温柔的声音说道:"进来吧,我的乖孩子,我给你一个苹果吃。"小男孩听到这话,说道:"妈妈,你今天真亲切!我的确很想吃苹果。""好的,跟我进来吧!"说罢,她把他带进贮藏室,揭开箱子盖说:"你自己拿一个吧。"当小男孩俯身低头,伸手准备从箱子里拿苹果时,她狠毒地拉下了箱盖,"砰!"的一声,沉重的箱盖猛地砍下了这可怜小男孩的头,头掉落在了箱子里的苹果中。 当她意识到自己所做的事以后,感到非常恐惧,心里算计着怎样才能让自己与这事脱离干系。 她走进自己的卧室,从抽屉里拿出一条手巾,来到贮藏室,将小男孩的头接在他的脖子上,用手巾缠住,又将他抱到门前的一个凳子上坐着,在他手里塞了一个苹果。 一切料理完毕,没有一个人看见她所干的勾当。
不久,小女孩玛杰丽走进厨房,看见妈妈站在火炉旁,搅动着一锅热水,她说道:"妈妈 ,哥哥坐在门边,手里拿着一个苹果,我要他给我,但他一句话也不说,脸色好苍白,我好怕哟。 "妈妈回答道:"混帐! 你再去,如果他不回答你的话,就狠狠地给他一耳光。 "玛杰丽转身来到门口对哥哥说:"哥哥,把苹果给我。 "但哥哥不说一句话,她伸手一耳光打去,哥哥的头一下子就打被落下来。这一下,她连魂都吓跑了,尖叫着跑到她妈妈面前,说自己把哥哥的头打掉了,说着就伤心欲绝地大哭起来。妈妈说道:"玛杰丽! 你做了什么事呀? 唉! 已经做了的事是无法挽回的了,我们最好把他处理掉,不要向任何人提起这事。 "母亲抓起小男孩,把他剁碎,放到锅子里,做了一锅汤。可是玛杰丽只是站在那里哭,眼泪一滴滴地掉进锅里,所以锅里根本就不用放盐了。
当父亲回家吃饭的时候,他问道:"我的小儿子呢?"母亲没有吭声,她端了一大碗黑汤放在桌子上,玛杰丽一直伤心地低着头在痛哭。 父亲又一次问到他的小儿子到哪里去了,母亲说道:"啊!我想他去他叔叔家了。"父亲问道:"有什么事走得这么匆忙,连向我告别都来不及就走了呢?"母亲又回答说:"我知道他很想去,他还求我让他在那里住一段时间哩,他在那里一定会过得很好。"父亲说道:"唉!我可不喜欢他这样做,他应该向我告别再走才对。"他继续吃了起来,但心里却仍然对他的儿子放心不下,总觉得有些伤心,就对小女儿说:"玛杰丽,你哭什么呢?我想你哥哥会回来的。"但玛杰丽很快溜出餐厅,来到自己的房间,打开抽屉,拿出她最好的丝制手绢,把她小哥哥的残骸包起来,提到屋外,放在了桧树下面。 她自始至终都在伤心地流着眼泪,到这时才觉得心里稍微轻松一点,便停止了哭泣。
等她擦干眼泪再看时,她发现桧树竟开始自动地前后摆动起来,一根根树枝伸展开来,然后又相互合在一起,就像是一个人在高兴地拍着手一样。 接着,树中显现出了薄薄的云雾,云雾的中间有一团燃烧着的火焰,一只漂亮的小鸟从火焰中腾起,飞向了天空。 小鸟飞走后,手巾和小男孩不见了,树也恢复了原样。 玛杰丽这时的内心才真正地快乐起来,仿佛她哥哥又活了一样,她高兴地走进屋子吃饭去了。
那只小鸟飞走之后,落在了一个金匠的房顶,开始唱道:
"我的母亲杀了她的小儿郎,
我的父亲把我吞进了肚肠,
美丽的玛杰丽小姑娘,
同情我惨遭魔掌,
把我安放在桧树身旁。
现在我快乐地到处飞翔,
飞过群山峡谷、飞过海洋,
我是一只小鸟,我多么漂亮! "
金匠坐在自己的店铺里正好做完一根金链条,当他听到屋顶上鸟儿的歌声时,站起来就往外跑,匆忙之中,滑落了一只鞋也顾不上去穿。 金匠冲到街上,腰间还系着工作围裙,一只手拿着铁钳,一只手拿着金链条。 他抬头一看,发现一只小鸟正栖息在屋顶上,太阳在小鸟光洁的羽毛上闪闪发亮。 他说道:"我漂亮的小鸟,你唱得多么甜美啊!请你再把这首歌唱一遍。"小鸟说道:"不行,没有报酬我不会再唱第二遍,如果你把金链条给我,我就再唱给你听。"金匠想了一下,举起金链条说:"在这儿,你只要再唱一遍,就拿去吧。"小鸟飞下来,用右爪抓住金链条,停在金匠近前唱道:
"我的母亲杀了她的小儿郎,
我的父亲以为我去向远方,
美丽的玛杰丽小姑娘,
同情我惨遭魔掌,
把我安放在桧树身旁。
现在我快乐地到处飞翔,
飞过群山峡谷、飞过海洋,
我是一只小鸟,我多么漂亮! "
唱完之后,小鸟飞落在一个鞋匠的屋顶上面,和前面一样唱了起来。
鞋匠听到歌声,连外衣都没穿就跑出屋门,抬头朝房顶望去,但刺眼的阳光照着他,使他不得不抬起手挡在眼睛前。 看出是只小鸟后,他说道:"小鸟,你唱得多么悦耳啊!"又对房子里喊道:"夫人!夫人!快出来,快来看我们的屋顶上落了一只漂亮的小鸟,它在唱歌呢!"然后,又叫来他的孩子们和伙计们。 他们都跑了出来,站在外面惊讶地看着这只小鸟,看着它红绿相衬的漂亮羽毛,看着它脖子上闪耀着金色光彩的羽环,看着它象星星一样亮晶晶的眼睛。 鞋匠说道:"喂,小鸟,请你再把那首歌唱一遍吧。"小鸟回答说:"不行,没有报酬我不会再唱第二遍。如果要我唱,你得给我一点东西。"鞋匠对他的妻子说道:"夫人,你快到楼上的作坊去找一双最好的,红色的新鞋子拿来给我。"妻子跑去把鞋子拿来了,鞋匠拿着鞋子说:"我漂亮的小鸟,拿去吧,但请你把那首歌再唱一遍。"小鸟飞下来用左爪抓住鞋子后,又飞上屋顶唱道:
"我的母亲杀了她的小儿郎,
我的父亲以为我去向远方,
美丽的玛杰丽小姑娘,
同情我惨遭魔掌,
把我安放在桧树身旁。
现在我快乐地到处飞翔,
飞过群山峡谷、飞过海洋,
我是一只小鸟,我多么漂亮! "
它唱完之后,一只爪子抓着鞋子,另一只爪子抓着金链条飞走了。 它飞了很远很远才来到一座磨坊,磨子正在"轰隆隆!轰咚咚!轰隆隆!轰咚咚!"地转动着。 磨坊里有二十个伙计正在劈着一块磨石,伙计们用力地"咔嚓!噼啪!咔嚓!噼啪!"地劈着,磨子的轰隆隆、轰咚咚与伙计们劈磨石的咔嚓、噼啪声交织在一起,难听极了。
小鸟栖息在磨坊边的一棵椴树上,开始唱道:
"我的母亲杀了她的小儿郎,
我的父亲以为我去向远方,"
两个磨坊伙计停下手中的活听了起来。
"美丽的玛杰丽小姑娘,
同情我惨遭魔掌,
把我安放在桧树身旁。 "
除了一个伙计之外,其他伙计都停止了手中的活,向树上望去。
"现在我快乐地到处飞翔,
飞过群山峡谷、飞过海洋,
我是一只小鸟,我多么漂亮! "
歌一唱完,最后一名伙计也听到了,他站起来说道:"啊!小鸟,你唱得多动听呀,请你再唱一次,让我把整首歌听一遍!"小鸟说:"不行,没有报酬我不会唱第二遍,把那块磨石给我,我就再唱一遍。"那人回答说:"哎呀!那块磨石不是我的,如果是我的,你拿去我求之不得哩。"其余的伙计都说:"来吧,只要你把那歌再唱一遍,我们都同意给你。"小鸟从树上飞下来,二十个伙计拿着一根长杠子,用尽力气"嗨哟!嗨哟!嗨哟!"终于将磨石的一边抬了起来,小鸟把头穿进磨石中间的孔内,在众伙计目瞪口呆的注视下,背着二十个人都没能抬起的磨石,飞上了椴树,他们惊奇得不得了,而小鸟就像没事一般,把那首歌又唱了一遍。
小鸟唱完歌,张开翅膀,一只爪抓着链子,另一只爪子抓着鞋子,脖子上套着磨石,飞回到他父亲的房子上。
现在,他的父亲、母亲和玛杰丽正坐在一起准备吃饭。 父亲说:"我感觉现在是多么的轻松,多么的愉快啊!"但他的母亲却说:"唉!我心情好沉重,真是糟透了。我觉得就像有暴风雨要来似的。"玛杰丽没有说话,她坐下便哭了起来。 正在这个时候,小鸟飞来落在了房屋的顶上。 父亲说道:"上帝保佑!我真快乐,总觉得又要看到一个老朋友一样。"母亲说道:"哎哟!我好痛苦,我的牙齿在不停地打战,浑身的血管里的血就像在燃烧一样!"说着,她撕开了身上的长外套想让自己镇静下来。 玛杰丽独自坐在一个角落里,她前面的裙摆上放着一只盒子,她哭得非常厉害,眼泪唰唰地淌个不停,把盒子都流满了。
小鸟接着飞到桧树顶上开始唱道:
"我的母亲杀了她的小儿郎,--"
母亲马上用手捂住耳朵,把眼睛闭得紧紧的,她认为这样一来既不会看见,也不会听到了。 但歌声就像可怕的暴风雨一样灌进了她的耳朵,她的眼睛像闪电一样在燃烧,在闪光。 父亲吃惊地叫道:"哎呀!夫人。"
"我的父亲以为我去向远方,--"
"那是一只多么漂亮的小鸟啊,他唱得多么美妙动听啊!
看那羽毛在阳光下就像许多闪烁的宝石一样。 "
"美丽的玛杰丽小姑娘,
同情我惨遭魔掌,
把我放在桧树身旁。 --"
玛杰丽抬起头,悲伤地哭泣着。 父亲说:"我要出去,要走近前去看看这只小鸟。"母亲说:"啊!别留下我一个人在这里,我感觉这房子就像在燃烧一样。"但父亲还是走出去看那只鸟去了,小鸟继续唱道:
"现在我快乐地到处飞翔,
飞过群山峡谷、飞过海洋,
我是一只小鸟,我多么漂亮! "
小鸟刚一唱完,他就把金链条扔下去,套在了父亲的脖子上。 父亲戴着非常适合,他走回房子里说道:"你们看,小鸟给了我一条多么漂亮的金项链,看起来多气派呀!"但他妻子非常害怕,吓得瘫在了地板上,帽子也掉了下来,就像死了一样。
这时,小鸟又开始唱了起来,玛杰丽说:"我也要出去,看看小鸟是否会给我东西。"她刚一出门,小鸟就把红鞋子扔到她的面前。 她把鞋捡起来穿上,觉得自己一下子轻松快乐起来了。 跳着跑进屋子里说道:"我出去时心情压抑,悲痛,现在我真快乐!你们看小鸟给我的鞋子多么漂亮呀!"母亲说道:"哎呀!像是世界的末日来到了一样!我也得出去试一试,说不定我会觉得好一些的。"她刚一出去,小鸟把磨石扔到了她的头上,将她砸得粉碎。
父亲和玛杰丽听到声音,急忙跑了出来,母亲和小鸟都不见了,他们只看见烟雾和火焰在那里升腾燃烧。 当烟火散尽消失后,小男孩站在了他们身边,他伸手牵着父亲和玛杰丽的手,走进屋子里,快快乐乐地和他们一起吃起饭来。




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