ENGLISH

Snow-white

POLSKI

Królewna Śnieżka


It was the middle of winter, and the snow-flakes were falling like feathers from the sky, and a queen sat at her window working, and her embroidery-frame was of ebony. And as she worked, gazing at times out on the snow, she pricked her finger, and there fell from it three drops of blood on the snow. And when she saw how bright and red it looked, she said to herself, "Oh that I had a child as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the embroidery frame!" Not very long after she had a daughter, with a skin as white as snow, lips as red as blood, and hair as black as ebony, and she was named Snow-white. And when she was born the queen died. After a year had gone by the king took another wife, a beautiful woman, but proud and overbearing, and she could not bear to be surpassed in beauty by any one. She had a magic looking-glass, and she used to stand before it, and look in it, and say,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the looking-glass would answer,

"You are fairest of them all."

And she was contented, for she knew that the looking-glass spoke the truth. Now, Snow-white was growing prettier and prettier, and when she was seven years old she was as beautiful as day, far more so than the queen herself. So one day when the queen went to her mirror and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

It answered,

"Queen, you are full fair, 'tis true,
But Snow-white fairer is than you."

This gave the queen a great shock, and she became yellow and green with envy, and from that hour her heart turned against Snow-white, and she hated her. And envy and pride like ill weeds grew in her heart higher every day, until she had no peace day or night. At last she sent for a huntsman, and said, "Take the child out into the woods, so that I may set eyes on her no more. You must put her to death, and bring me her heart for a token." The huntsman consented, and led her away; but when he drew his cutlass to pierce Snow-white's innocent heart, she began to weep, and to say, "Oh, dear huntsman, do not take my life; I will go away into the wild wood, and never come home again." And as she was so lovely the huntsman had pity on her, and said, "Away with you then, poor child;" for he thought the wild animals would be sure to devour her, and it was as if a stone had been rolled away from his heart when he spared to put her to death. Just at that moment a young wild boar came running by, so he caught and killed it, and taking out its heart, he brought it to the queen for a token. And it was salted and cooked, and the wicked woman ate it up, thinking that there was an end of Snow-white.

Now, when the poor child found herself quite alone in the wild woods, she felt full of terror, even of the very leaves on the trees, and she did not know what to do for fright. Then she began to run over the sharp stones and through the thorn bushes, and the wild beasts after her, but they did her no harm. She ran as long as her feet would carry her; and when the evening drew near she came to a little house, and she went inside to rest. Everything there was very small, but as pretty and clean as possible. There stood the little table ready laid, and covered with a white cloth, and seven little plates, and seven knives and forks, and drinking-cups. By the wall stood seven little beds, side by side, covered with clean white quilts. Snow-white, being very hungry and thirsty, ate from each plate a little porridge and bread, and drank out of each little cup a drop of wine, so as not to finish up one portion alone. After that she felt so tired that she lay down on one of the beds, but it did not seem to suit her; one was too long, another too short, but at last the seventh was quite right; and so she lay down upon it, committed herself to heaven, and fell asleep.

When it was quite dark, the masters of the house came home. They were seven dwarfs, whose occupation was to dig underground among the mountains. When they had lighted their seven candles, and it was quite light in the little house, they saw that some one must have been in, as everything was not in the same order in which they left it. The first said, "Who has been sitting in my little chair?" The second said, "Who has been eating from my little plate?" The third said, "Who has been taking my little loaf?" The fourth said, "Who has been tasting my porridge?" The fifth said, "Who has been using my little fork?" The sixth said, "Who has been cutting with my little knife?" The seventh said, "Who has been drinking from my little cup?" Then the first one, looking round, saw a hollow in his bed, and cried, "Who has been lying on my bed?" And the others came running, and cried, "Some one has been on our beds too!" But when the seventh looked at his bed, he saw little Snow-white lying there asleep. Then he told the others, who came running up, crying out in their astonishment, and holding up their seven little candles to throw a light upon Snow-white. "O goodness! O gracious!" cried they, "what beautiful child is this?" and were so full of joy to see her that they did not wake her, but let her sleep on. And the seventh dwarf slept with his comrades, an hour at a time with each, until the night had passed. When it was morning, and Snow-white awoke and saw the seven dwarfs, she was very frightened; but they seemed quite friendly, and asked her what her name was, and she told them; and then they asked how she came to be in their house. And she related to them how her step-mother had wished her to be put to death, and how the huntsman had spared her life, and how she had run the whole day long, until at last she had found their little house. Then the dwarfs said, "If you will keep our house for us, and cook, and wash, and make the beds, and sew and knit, and keep everything tidy and clean, you may stay with us, and you shall lack nothing." - "With all my heart," said Snow-white; and so she stayed, and kept the house in good order. In the morning the dwarfs went to the mountain to dig for gold; in the evening they came home, and their supper had to be ready for them. All the day long the maiden was left alone, and the good little dwarfs warned her, saying, "Beware of your step-mother, she will soon know you are here. Let no one into the house." Now the queen, having eaten Snow-white's heart, as she supposed, felt quite sure that now she was the first and fairest, and so she came to her mirror, and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the glass answered,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

Then she was very angry, for the glass always spoke the truth, and she knew that the huntsman must have deceived her, and that Snow-white must still be living. And she thought and thought how she could manage to make an end of her, for as long as she was not the fairest in the land, envy left her no rest. At last she thought of a plan; she painted her face and dressed herself like an old pedlar woman, so that no one would have known her. In this disguise she went across the seven mountains, until she came to the house of the seven little dwarfs, and she knocked at the door and cried, "Fine wares to sell! fine wares to sell!" Snow-white peeped out of the window and cried, "Good-day, good woman, what have you to sell?" - "Good wares, fine wares," answered she, "laces of all colours;"and she held up a piece that was woven of variegated silk. "I need not be afraid of letting in this good woman," thought Snow-white, and she unbarred the door and bought the pretty lace. "What a figure you are, child!" said the old woman, "come and let me lace you properly for once." Snow-white, suspecting nothing, stood up before her, and let her lace her with the new lace; but the old woman laced so quick and tight that it took Snow-white's breath away, and she fell down as dead. "Now you have done with being the fairest," said the old woman as she hastened away. Not long after that, towards evening, the seven dwarfs came home, and were terrified to see their dear Snow-white lying on the ground, without life or motion; they raised her up, and when they saw how tightly she was laced they cut the lace in two; then she began to draw breath, and little by little she returned to life. When the dwarfs heard what had happened they said, "The old pedlar woman was no other than the wicked queen; you must beware of letting any one in when we are not here!" And when the wicked woman got home she went to her glass and said,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And it answered as before,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

When she heard that she was so struck with surprise that all the blood left her heart, for she knew that Snow-white must still be living. "But now," said she, "I will think of something that will be her ruin." And by witchcraft she made a poisoned comb. Then she dressed herself up to look like another different sort of old woman. So she went across the seven mountains and came to the house of the seven dwarfs, and knocked at the door and cried, "Good wares to sell! good wares to sell!" Snow-white looked out and said, "Go away, I must not let anybody in." - "But you are not forbidden to look," said the old woman, taking out the poisoned comb and holding it up. It pleased the poor child so much that she was tempted to open the door; and when the bargain was made the old woman said, "Now, for once your hair shall be properly combed." Poor Snow-white, thinking no harm, let the old woman do as she would, but no sooner was the comb put in her hair than the poison began to work, and the poor girl fell down senseless. "Now, you paragon of beauty," said the wicked woman, "this is the end of you," and went off. By good luck it was now near evening, and the seven little dwarfs came home. When they saw Snow-white lying on the ground as dead, they thought directly that it was the step-mother's doing, and looked about, found the poisoned comb, and no sooner had they drawn it out of her hair than Snow-white came to herself, and related all that had passed. Then they warned her once more to be on her guard, and never again to let any one in at the door. And the queen went home and stood before the looking-glass and said,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the looking-glass answered as before,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

When she heard the looking-glass speak thus she trembled and shook with anger. "Snow-white shall die," cried she, "though it should cost me my own life!" And then she went to a secret lonely chamber, where no one was likely to come, and there she made a poisonous apple. It was beautiful to look upon, being white with red cheeks, so that any one who should see it must long for it, but whoever ate even a little bit of it must die. When the apple was ready she painted her face and clothed herself like a peasant woman, and went across the seven mountains to where the seven dwarfs lived. And when she knocked at the door Snow-white put her head out of the window and said, "I dare not let anybody in; the seven dwarfs told me not." - "All right," answered the woman; "I can easily get rid of my apples elsewhere. There, I will give you one." - "No," answered Snow-white, "I dare not take anything." - "Are you afraid of poison?" said the woman, "look here, I will cut the apple in two pieces; you shall have the red side, I will have the white one." For the apple was so cunningly made, that all the poison was in the rosy half of it. Snow-white longed for the beautiful apple, and as she saw the peasant woman eating a piece of it she could no longer refrain, but stretched out her hand and took the poisoned half. But no sooner had she taken a morsel of it into her mouth than she fell to the earth as dead. And the queen, casting on her a terrible glance, laughed aloud and cried, "As white as snow, as red as blood, as black as ebony! this time the dwarfs will not be able to bring you to life again." And when she went home and asked the looking-glass,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

at last it answered,

"You are the fairest now of all."

Then her envious heart had peace, as much as an envious heart can have. The dwarfs, when they came home in the evening, found Snow-white lying on the ground, and there came no breath out of her mouth, and she was dead. They lifted her up, sought if anything poisonous was to be found, cut her laces, combed her hair, washed her with water and wine, but all was of no avail, the poor child was dead, and remained dead. Then they laid her on a bier, and sat all seven of them round it, and wept and lamented three whole days. And then they would have buried her, but that she looked still as if she were living, with her beautiful blooming cheeks. So they said, "We cannot hide her away in the black ground." And they had made a coffin of clear glass, so as to be looked into from all sides, and they laid her in it, and wrote in golden letters upon it her name, and that she was a king's daughter. Then they set the coffin out upon the mountain, and one of them always remained by it to watch. And the birds came too, and mourned for Snow-white, first an owl, then a raven, and lastly, a dove. Now, for a long while Snow-white lay in the coffin and never changed, but looked as if she were asleep, for she was still as' white as snow, as red as blood, and her hair was as black as ebony. It happened, however, that one day a king's son rode through the wood and up to the dwarfs' house, which was near it. He saw on the mountain the coffin, and beautiful Snow-white within it, and he read what was written in golden letters upon it. Then he said to the dwarfs, "Let me have the coffin, and I will give you whatever you like to ask for it." But the dwarfs told him that they could not part with it for all the gold in the world. But he said, "I beseech you to give it me, for I cannot live without looking upon Snow-white; if you consent I will bring you to great honour, and care for you as if you were my brethren." When he so spoke the good little dwarfs had pity upon him and gave him the coffin, and the king's son called his servants and bid them carry it away on their shoulders. Now it happened that as they were going along they stumbled over a bush, and with the shaking the bit of poisoned apple flew out of her throat. It was not long before she opened her eyes, threw up the cover of the coffin, and sat up, alive and well. "Oh dear! where am I?" cried she. The king's son answered, full of joy, "You are near me," and, relating all that had happened, he said, "I would rather have you than anything in the world; come with me to my father's castle and you shall be my bride." And Snow-white was kind, and went with him, and their wedding was held with pomp and great splendour. But Snow-white's wicked step-mother was also bidden to the feast, and when she had dressed herself in beautiful clothes she went to her looking-glass and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

The looking-glass answered,

''O Queen, although you are of beauty rare,
The young bride is a thousand times more fair."

Then she railed and cursed, and was beside herself with disappointment and anger. First she thought she would not go to the wedding; but then she felt she should have no peace until she went and saw the bride. And when she saw her she knew her for Snow-white, and could not stir from the place for anger and terror. For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead.
Pewnego razu w środku zimy, gdy z nieba padały płatki śniegu jak pierze, królowa siedziała przy oknie o ramach z czarnego hebanu i szyła. Szyjąc tak patrzyła na śnieg aż ukłuła się igłą w palec. Na śnieg poleciały trzy krople krwi. A ponieważ czerwień pięknie wyglądała na białym śniegu, pomyślała sobie: "Chciałabym mieć dziecko białe jak ten śnieg, czerwone jak krew i czarne jak drewno tych ram." Wkrótce urodziła córeczkę białą jak śnieg, o ustach czerwonych jak krew, o włosach jak hebanowe drewno. Dlatego nazwano ją śnieżką. Gdy dziecko urodziło się, królowa umarła.

Po roku król wziął sobie drugą żonę. Była to pani piękna, ale dumna i próżna. Nie potrafiłaby znieść piękniejszej od siebie. A miała ona cudowne lustro. Gdy stawała przed nim by się obejrzeć, mówiła:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

A Lusterko odpowiadało:

"Tyś królowo najpiękniejsza na świecie"

I była zadowolona, bo wiedziała, że lustro zawsze mówi prawdę.

Tymczasem Śnieżka rosła i stawała się coraz piękniejsza, a gdy miała już siedem lat, była piękna jak jasny dzień, piękniejsza niż sama królowa. Kiedy więc ta zapytała lustro:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

dostała odpowiedź:

"Nikt piękniejszy w tej komnacie nie mieszka,
lecz tysiąc razy piękniejsza od ciebie jest Śnieżka"

Mocno strapiło to królową, aż zrobiła się żółta i zielona z zawiści. Od tej pory gdy spotykała śnieżkę, wnętrzności się w niej nicowały, tak wielka była jej nienawiść do tej dzieweczki. Pycha i zawiść rosły jak chwast w jej sercu coraz to wyżej i nie zaznała odtąd spokoju ni za dnia ni w nocy. Zawołała więc myśliwego i rzekła: "Wyprowadź do dziecko w las, bo nie chcą go widzieć oczy moje. Zabijesz ją tam, a na dowód przyniesiesz mi jej płuca i wątrobę." Myśliwy był posłuszny tym słowom i wyprowadził ją do lasu, a gdy wyciągnął już nóż, by przebić śnieżki niewinne serce, dziewczynka zapłakała i rzekła: "Ach, drogi myśliwy, nie zabijaj mnie. Pójdę w dziki las i nigdy nie wrócę do domu." A ponieważ była tak piękna, myśliwy zlitował się nad nią i rzekł: "Biegnij, biedne dziecko! – Dzikie zwierzęta i tak cię wkrótce pożrą," pomyślał, lecz mimo to zrobiło mu się tak, jakby mu kamień z serca spadł, bo nie musiał jej zabijać. Gdy z zarośli wyskoczył młody warchlak, przebił go swym nożem, wyciął płuca i wątrobę i jako dowód zaniósł królowej. Kucharz musiał gotować to w soli, a zła baba jadła tę strawę myśląc, że to płuca i wątroba śnieżki.

Biedne dziecko było w lesie zupełnie samo, bało się tak bardzo, że oglądało się za wszystkimi liśćmi na drzewach i nie wiedziało, co dalej począć. Zaczęło biec przez ostre kamienie i ciernie, a dzikie zwierzęta przebiegały mu drogę nic mu nie czyniąc. Dziewczynka biegła tak długo, jak tylko nogi chciały ją nieść, aż wieczór zaczął nadciągać. Wtedy zobaczyła domek i weszła do niego, aby odpocząć. W domku wszystko było małe, ale takie delikatne i czyste, że aż ciężko powiedzieć. Stał tam biało nakryty stoliczek i siedem małych talerzy, każdy zaś talerzyk miał za sąsiada łyżeczkę, obok leżało siedem nożyków, widelczyków, i siedem kubeczków. Pod ścianą stało siedem łóżeczek, jedno obok drugiego, a wszystkie przykryte śnieżno białym prześcieradłem. Śnieżka, ponieważ była głodna i bardzo chciało jej się pić, zjadła z każdego talerzyka troszeczkę warzyw i chleba, z każdego kubeczka wypiła kropelkę wina, bo nie chciała jednemu zjeść wszystko. Potem chciała położyć się do łóżka, bo była bardzo zmęczona, ale żadne nie pasowało, jedno było za długie, inne za krótkie, siódme wreszcie było w sam raz, położyła się więc do niego, poleciła się Bożej opiece i zasnęła.

Gdy zrobiło się całkiem ciemno, przyszli panowie tego domku. Było to siedmiu karzełków, którzy kopali rudę w górach. Zapalili siedem światełek, a gdy w domku zrobiło się jasno, zobaczyli, że ktoś w nim był, bo nie wszystko było w takim porządku, w jakim zostawili dom. Pierwszy zaś powiedział: "Kto siedział na moim krzesełku?," drugi dodał: "Kto jadł z mojego talerzyka?," trzeci: "Kto wziął moją bułeczkę?," czwarty "Kto zjadł moje warzywo?," piąty: "Kto używał mojego widelczyka?," szósty "Kto kroił moim nożykiem?," siódmy: "Kto pił z mojego kubeczka?" Potem pierwszy się rozejrzał, zobaczył na swoim łóżku małe wgłębienie i rzekł: "Kto był w moim łóżeczku?" Zaraz przybiegli inni i zawołali: "I w moim ktoś leżał," lecz siódmy, gdy spojrzał na swoje łóżko, zobaczył śpiącą śnieżkę. Zawołał wtedy resztę. Przybiegli i krzyczeli z zachwytu. Przynieśli swoje światełka i poświecili na śnieżkę. "O mój Boże, o mój Boże!," wołali, "ależ piękne jest to dziecię!" i bardzo się cieszyli, że jej nie zbudzili, lecz pozwolili spać jej dalej. Siódmy karzełek spał u swoich kompanów, po godzinie u każdego, aż minęła noc.

Gdy Śnieżka wstała rankiem, zobaczyła siedmiu karzełków, wystraszyła się bardzo. Byli jednak bardzo mili i zapytali: "Jak się nazywasz?" - "Nazywam się Śnieżka," odpowiedziała. "Jak trafiłaś do naszego domku?" - pytały dalej karzełki. Wtedy opowiedziała im, jak macocha chciała ją zabić, jak myśliwy darował jej życie, jak biegła cały dzień, aż wreszcie znalazła ten domek. Wtedy karzełki zapytały: "Jeśli zechcesz troszczyć się o nasz dom, gotować, słać łóżeczka, prać, szyć, dziergać i wszystko trzymać w czystości i porządku, możesz z nami zostać, a nie zbraknie ci niczego." - "Chcę," odpowiedziała Śnieżka. "Chcę z całego serca." i została z nimi. Dbała w domu o porządek. Karzełki rano wychodziły do pracy w górach by szukać rudy i złota, a gdy wieczorem wracały, jedzenie musiało już być gotowe. Dziewczynka cały dzień była sama. Dobre karzełki ostrzegały ją i mówiły: "Strzeż się macochy! Wkrótce się dowie, że tu jesteś. Nie wpuszczaj nikogo!"

Królowa myślała, że zjadła wątrobę i płuca śnieżki i była pewna, że znowu jest tą pierwszą i najpiękniejszą, aż pewnego dnia stanęła przed lustrem i rzekła:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

A Lustro odpowiedziało:

"Tu najpiękniejszą jest królowa,
lecz od niej piękniejsza jest panna owa.
co za górami z karzełkami mieszka
i zowie się Śnieżka"

I wystraszyła się, bo wiedziała, że lustro nigdy nie kłamie. Zauważyła, że myśliwy ją oszukał, a Śnieżka wciąż była przy życiu. Odtąd myślała, myślała i myślała ciągle od nowa, jak ją zabić, bo dopóki żyła, zawiść nie dałaby jej spokoju. A gdy w końcu coś wymyśliła, zafarbowała sobie twarz, ubrała się jak stara przekupka i była nie do poznania. Pod tą postacią wyruszyła za siedem gór do siedmiu karzełków, zapukała do drzwi i zawołała: "Piękny towar, towar na sprzedaż!" Śnieżka wyjrzała przez okno i zawołała: "Dzień dobry, dobra kobieto, co tam macie na sprzedaż?" - "Dobry towar, piękny towar," odpowiedziała, "Sznurowane gorseciki we wszelkich kolorach" i wyciągnęła jeden, który był utkany z kolorowego jedwabiu. "Tą dobrą kobietę na pewno mogę wpuścić," pomyślała Śnieżka, odryglowała drzwi i kupiła sobie ładny gorsecik. "Dziecko, ależ ładnie wyglądasz!," powiedziała starucha, "Chodź, to cię porządnie zasznuruję." Śnieżka dobrodusznie stanęła przed nią i pozwoliła sobie zasznurować gorsecik, a starucha wiązała szybko i tak mocno, że Śnieżka nie mogła złapać oddechu i martwa padła na ziemię. "A byłaś taka ładna, najpiękniejsza..." powiedziała stara i czym prędzej wyszła.

Niedługo potem, pod wieczór, do domu wróciło siedmiu karzełków. Przerazili się, gdy zobaczyli, jak ich kochana Śnieżka leży na ziemi całkiem bez ruchu, jak martwa. Podnieśli ją więc do góry, a ponieważ dostrzegli, że była mocno związana, rozcięli gorsecik. Dziewczynka zaczęła oddychać i powoli wracało do niej życie. Gdy karzełki usłyszały, co się stało, rzekły: "Ta stara przekupka to nikt inny jak bezbożna królowa: strzeż się i nie wpuszczaj nikogo, gdy nas nie ma z tobą."

Zła Baba podeszła do lustra, gdy tylko wróciła do domu i zapytała:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

A Lustro odpowiedziało jak zawsze:

"Tu najpiękniejszą jest królowa,
lecz od niej piękniejsza jest panna owa.
co za górami z karzełkami mieszka
i zowie się Śnieżka"

Gdy to usłyszała, cała krew ścisnęła się w jej sercu i przelękła się, bo już wiedziała, że Śnieżka wróciła do życia. "Będę musiała coś wymyśleć, by w końcu sczezła" powiedziała i za pomocą czarcich sztuk, na których się znała, zrobiła zatruty grzebień. Przebrała się potem i przybrała postać innej starej baby. Poszła tak za siedem gór do siedmiu karzełków, zapukała do drzwi i zawołała: "Doby towar sprzedaję, dobry towar!" Śnieżka wyjrzała i rzekła "Idź dalej, bo nie wolno mi nikogo wpuszczać" - "Ale obejrzeć chyba możesz," powiedziała starucha i wyjęła zatruty grzebień i podniosła go do góry. Dziecku spodobał się tak bardzo, że dało się ogłupić i otworzyło drzwi. Gdy już dogadały się co do kupna, rzekła stara: "A teraz porządnie cię uczeszę!" Biedna Śnieżka nic sobie przy tym nie pomyślała i pozwoliła starej działać, lecz ledwo stara wetknęła jej grzebień we włosy, trucizna zaczęła działać i dziewczynka padła bez zmysłów na ziemię. "Oto uosobienie piękna," rzekła zła baba, "Teraz już po niej!," i odeszła. Na szczęście zbliżał się wieczór i siedem karzełków wracało już do domu. Kiedy zobaczyli, jak Śnieżka leży martwa na ziemi, od razu pomyśleli, że musiała to być macocha. Obszukali więc śnieżkę i znaleźli trujący grzebień, a gdy tylko go wyciągnęli Śnieżka wróciła do życia i opowiedziała im, co się stało. Ostrzegli ją więc jeszcze raz, aby się miała na baczności i nikomu nie otwierała drzwi.

Gdy królowa wróciła do domu, stanęła przed lustrem i rzekła:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

A Lustro odpowiedziało jak zawsze:

"Tu najpiękniejszą jest królowa,
lecz od niej piękniejsza jest panna owa.
co za górami z karzełkami mieszka
i zowie się Śnieżka"

Gdy usłyszała te słowa od lustra, zatrzęsła się i zadrżała ze złości. "Śnieżka musi umrzeć!" zawołała, "Nawet gdybym miała za to zapłacić życiem!" Poszła potem do tajemnej komnaty, gdzie nikt prócz niej nie wchodził, i zrobiła trujące jabłko. Z wierzchu było piękne, czerwono zielone, a każdy, kto na nie spojrzał, miał na nie ochotę, lecz gdy ktoś zjadł kawałek, musiał umrzeć. Gdy jabłko było już gotowe, zafarbowała sobie twarz, przebrała się za chłopkę i poszła za siedem gór do siedmiu karzełków. Zapukała, Śnieżka wychyliła głowę przez okno i rzekła: "Nie wolno mi nikogo wpuszczać, siedmiu karzełków mi zabroniło." - "święta racja" odpowiedziała chłopka, "Chcę się pozbyć moich jabłek. Weź to jedno w podarku." - "Nie," odrzekła Śnieżka, "nie wolno mi niczego przyjmować" - "Boisz się trucizny?," powiedziała stara, "Popatrz, przekroję jabłko na dwie części. Czerwoną połowę zjesz ty, a zieloną ja." Jabłko było tak spreparowane, że tylko czerwona połowa była zatruta. Śnieżka miała wielką ochotę na to jabłko, a kiedy zobaczyła, że chłopka je swą połowę, nie mogła się powstrzymać, wyciągnęła rękę i wzięła trującą połowę. Ledwo kęs znalazł się w jej ustach, padła martwa na ziemię. Królowa patrzyła na nią groźnym wzrokiem i śmiała się wniebogłosy. Wreszcie rzekła: "biała jak śnieg, czerwona jak krew, czarna jak heban! Tym razem karły cię nie zbudzą!" A kiedy w domu zapytała lustro:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

Lusterko odpowiedziało:

"Tyś królowo najpiękniejsza na świecie"

I wtedy jej zawistne serce zaznało spokoju, na ile zawistne serce spokoju zaznać może.

Gdy karzełki wieczorem wróciły do domu zastały śnieżkę leżącą bez tchu na ziemi. Była martwa. Podniosły ją, szukały, czy nie ma czegoś trującego, rozwiązały rzemyki, przeczesały włosy, myły ją w wodzie i winie, lecz nic nie pomogło. Ich drogie dziecko było i pozostało martwe. Położyły ją na grobowych marach, usiadły całą siódemką i opłakiwały ją. Płakały trzy dni, potem chciały ją pogrzebać, lecz wyglądała świeżo jak żywy człowiek i wciąż miała piękne rumiane policzki. Powiedziały więc: "Nie możemy jej oddać czarnej ziemi," i zrobiły trumnę z przeźroczystego szkła, tak że można ją było widzieć ze wszystkich stron, położyły ją do niej i złotymi literami wypisały jej imię, oraz to że była królewną. Potem zaniosły trumnę na górę, a jeden z nich zawsze był przy niej i jej strzegł. Przychodziły także zwierzęta, aby opłakiwać śnieżkę, najpierw sowa, potem kruk, na końcu gołąbek.

Śnieżka długo długo leżała w trumnie, lecz śmierć nie odcisnęła na niej piętna. Wyglądała, jakby spała, wciąż biała jak śnieg, z ustami czerwonymi jak krew, włosami czarnymi jak heban. Zdarzyło się jednak, że pewien królewicz zapuścił się w las i trafił do domu karzełków by w nim przenocować. Na górze zobaczył trumnę, a w niej piękną śnieżkę. Przeczytał, co wypisane było złotymi literami. Rzekł wtedy do karzełków: "Oddajcie mi tę trumnę, a dam wam wszystko, czego tylko zechcecie." Ale karzełki odpowiedziały: "Nie oddamy jej za całe złoto tego świata." Wtedy królewicz rzekł: "Więc podarujcie mi ją, bo nie mogę już żyć bez widoku śnieżki. Będę ją czcił i poważał jak kogoś mi najdroższego." Gdy to powiedział, skruszył serca dobrych karzełków i dały mu trumnę. Królewicz kazał ją nieść służącym na plecach. I wtedy stało się, że potknęli się o jakiś krzew. Trumną zatrzęsło, a z ust śnieżki wypadł zatruty kawałek jabłka. Niedługo potem otworzyła oczy, podniosła wieko trumny i wyprostowała się. Była żywa! "O Boże, gdzież jestem?" zawołała. Królewicz odrzekł pełen radości: "Jesteś u mnie," i opowiedział jej, co się stało, a potem dodał: "Mam ku tobie więcej upodobania niż dla całego świata. Pójdź ze mną na zamek ojca mego i zostań moją żoną." Śnieżka była mu łaskawa i poszła z nim, a ich wesele było cudowne i pełne przepychu.

Na uroczystość zaproszono także śnieżki bezbożną macochę. Kiedy już ubrała się w swe piękne suknie, stanęła przed lustrem i rzekła:

"Lustereczko, powiedz przecie
Kto jest najpiękniejszy w świecie."

A Lustro odpowiedziało:

"Tu najpiękniejszą jest królowa,
lecz od niej piękniejsza jest pani owa.
co w zamku z królewiczem mieszka
i zowie się Śnieżka."

Zaklęła zła baba i przelękła się tak bardzo, że nie mogła się ruszyć. Na początku wcale nie chciała iść na to wesele, lecz nie dawało jej to spokoju i musiała wyruszyć, by zobaczyć młodą królową. Gdy już przybyła, rozpoznała śnieżkę, lecz ze strachu i przerażenia nie mogła się ruszyć. Nad rozżarzonymi węglami stały już dla niej żelazne pantofle. Przyniesiono je w obcęgach i postawiono przed nią. W rozgrzanych do czerwoności pantoflach musiała tańczyć, aż padła martwa na ziemię.

Tłumaczył Jacek Fijołek, © Jacek Fijołek




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.