ENGLISH

The little peasant

日本語

水呑百姓


There was a certain village wherein no one lived but really rich peasants, and just one poor one, whom they called the little peasant. He had not even so much as a cow, and still less money to buy one, and yet he and his wife did so wish to have one. One day he said to her, "Hark you, I have a good thought, there is our gossip the carpenter, he shall make us a wooden calf, and paint it brown, so that it look like any other, and in time it will certainly get big and be a cow." The woman also liked the idea, and their gossip the carpenter cut and planed the calf, and painted it as it ought to be, and made it with its head hanging down as if it were eating.
Next morning when the cows were being driven out, the little peasant called the cow-herd and said, "Look, I have a little calf there, but it is still small and has still to be carried." The cow-herd said, "All right, and took it in his arms and carried it to the pasture, and set it among the grass." The little calf always remained standing like one which was eating, and the cow-herd said, "It will soon run alone, just look how it eats already!" At night when he was going to drive the herd home again, he said to the calf, "If thou canst stand there and eat thy fill, thou canst also go on thy four legs; I don't care to drag thee home again in my arms." But the little peasant stood at his door, and waited for his little calf, and when the cow-herd drove the cows through the village, and the calf was missing, he inquired where it was. The cow-herd answered, "It is still standing out there eating. It would not stop and come with us." But the little peasant said, "Oh, but I must have my beast back again." Then they went back to the meadow together, but some one had stolen the calf, and it was gone. The cow-herd said, "It must have run away." The peasant, however, said, "Don't tell me that," and led the cow-herd before the mayor, who for his carelessness condemned him to give the peasant a cow for the calf which had run away.

And now the little peasant and his wife had the cow for which they had so long wished, and they were heartily glad, but they had no food for it, and could give it nothing to eat, so it soon had to be killed. They salted the flesh, and the peasant went into the town and wanted to sell the skin there, so that he might buy a new calf with the proceeds. On the way he passed by a mill, and there sat a raven with broken wings, and out of pity he took him and wrapped him in the skin. As, however, the weather grew so bad and there was a storm of rain and wind, he could go no farther, and turned back to the mill and begged for shelter. The miller's wife was alone in the house, and said to the peasant, "Lay thyself on the straw there," and gave him a slice of bread with cheese on it. The peasant ate it, and lay down with his skin beside him, and the woman thought, "He is tired and has gone to sleep." In the meantime came the parson; the miller's wife received him well, and said, "My husband is out, so we will have a feast." The peasant listened, and when he heard about feasting he was vexed that he had been forced to make shift with a slice of bread with cheese on it. Then the woman served up four different things, roast meat, salad, cakes, and wine.

Just as they were about to sit down and eat, there was a knocking outside. The woman said, "Oh, heavens! It is my husband!" She quickly hid the roast meat inside the tiled stove, the wine under the pillow, the salad on the bed, the cakes under it, and the parson in the cupboard in the entrance. Then she opened the door for her husband, and said, "Thank heaven, thou art back again! There is such a storm, it looks as if the world were coming to an end." The miller saw the peasant lying on the straw, and asked, "What is that fellow doing there?" - "Ah," said the wife, "the poor knave came in the storm and rain, and begged for shelter, so I gave him a bit of bread and cheese, and showed him where the straw was." The man said, "I have no objection, but be quick and get me something to eat." The woman said, "But I have nothing but bread and cheese." - "I am contented with anything," replied the husband, "so far as I am concerned, bread and cheese will do," and looked at the peasant and said, "Come and eat some more with me." The peasant did not require to be invited twice, but got up and ate. After this the miller saw the skin in which the raven was, lying on the ground, and asked, "What hast thou there?" The peasant answered, "I have a soothsayer inside it." - "Can he foretell anything to me?" said the miller. "Why not?" answered the peasant, "but he only says four things, and the fifth he keeps to himself." The miller was curious, and said, "Let him foretell something for once." Then the peasant pinched the raven's head, so that he croaked and made a noise like krr, krr. The miller said, "What did he say?" The peasant answered, "In the first place, he says that there is some wine hidden under the pillow." - "Bless me!" cried the miller, and went there and found the wine. "Now go on," said he. The peasant made the raven croak again, and said, "In the second place, he says that there is some roast meat in the tiled stove." - "Upon my word!" cried the miller, and went thither, and found the roast meat. The peasant made the raven prophesy still more, and said, "Thirdly, he says that there is some salad on the bed." - "That would be a fine thing!" cried the miller, and went there and found the salad. At last the peasant pinched the raven once more till he croaked, and said, "Fourthly, he says that there are some cakes under the bed." - "That would be a fine thing!" cried the miller, and looked there, and found the cakes.

And now the two sat down to the table together, but the miller's wife was frightened to death, and went to bed and took all the keys with her. The miller would have liked much to know the fifth, but the little peasant said, "First, we will quickly eat the four things, for the fifth is something bad." So they ate, and after that they bargained how much the miller was to give for the fifth prophesy, until they agreed on three hundred thalers. Then the peasant once more pinched the raven's head till he croaked loudly. The miller asked, "What did he say?" The peasant replied, "He says that the Devil is hiding outside there in the cupboard in the entrance." The miller said, "The Devil must go out," and opened the house-door; then the woman was forced to give up the keys, and the peasant unlocked the cupboard. The parson ran out as fast as he could, and the miller said, "It was true; I saw the black rascal with my own eyes." The peasant, however, made off next morning by daybreak with the three hundred thalers.

At home the small peasant gradually launched out; he built a beautiful house, and the peasants said, "The small peasant has certainly been to the place where golden snow falls, and people carry the gold home in shovels." Then the small peasant was brought before the Mayor, and bidden to say from whence his wealth came. He answered, "I sold my cow's skin in the town, for three hundred thalers." When the peasants heard that, they too wished to enjoy this great profit, and ran home, killed all their cows, and stripped off their skins in order to sell them in the town to the greatest advantage. The Mayor, however, said, "But my servant must go first." When she came to the merchant in the town, he did not give her more than two thalers for a skin, and when the others came, he did not give them so much, and said, "What can I do with all these skins?"

Then the peasants were vexed that the small peasant should have thus overreached them, wanted to take vengeance on him, and accused him of this treachery before the Mayor. The innocent little peasant was unanimously sentenced to death, and was to be rolled into the water, in a barrel pierced full of holes. He was led forth, and a priest was brought who was to say a mass for his soul. The others were all obliged to retire to a distance, and when the peasant looked at the priest, he recognized the man who had been with the miller's wife. He said to him, "I set you free from the cupboard, set me free from the barrel." At this same moment up came, with a flock of sheep, the very shepherd who as the peasant knew had long been wishing to be Mayor, so he cried with all his might, "No, I will not do it; if the whole world insists on it, I will not do it!" The shepherd hearing that, came up to him, and asked, "What art thou about? What is it that thou wilt not do?" The peasant said, "They want to make me Mayor, if I will but put myself in the barrel, but I will not do it." The shepherd said, "If nothing more than that is needful in order to be Mayor, I would get into the barrel at once." The peasant said, "If thou wilt get in, thou wilt be Mayor." The shepherd was willing, and got in, and the peasant shut the top down on him; then he took the shepherd's flock for himself, and drove it away. The parson went to the crowd, and declared that the mass had been said. Then they came and rolled the barrel towards the water. When the barrel began to roll, the shepherd cried, "I am quite willing to be Mayor." They believed no otherwise than that it was the peasant who was saying this, and answered, "That is what we intend, but first thou shalt look about thee a little down below there," and they rolled the barrel down into the water.

After that the peasants went home, and as they were entering the village, the small peasant also came quietly in, driving a flock of sheep and looking quite contented. Then the peasants were astonished, and said, "Peasant, from whence comest thou? Hast thou come out of the water?" - "Yes, truly," replied the peasant, "I sank deep, deep down, until at last I got to the bottom; I pushed the bottom out of the barrel, and crept out, and there were pretty meadows on which a number of lambs were feeding, and from thence I brought this flock away with me." Said the peasants, "Are there any more there?" - "Oh, yes," said he, "more than I could do anything with." Then the peasants made up their minds that they too would fetch some sheep for themselves, a flock apiece, but the Mayor said, "I come first." So they went to the water together, and just then there were some of the small fleecy clouds in the blue sky, which are called little lambs, and they were reflected in the water, whereupon the peasants cried, "We already see the sheep down below!" The Mayor pressed forward and said, "I will go down first, and look about me, and if things promise well I'll call you." So he jumped in; splash! went the water; he made a sound as if he were calling them, and the whole crowd plunged in after him as one man. Then the entire village was dead, and the small peasant, as sole heir, became a rich man.
ある村に、本当に金持ちのお百姓だけが住んでいて、ただ一人だけ貧しいお百姓が住んでいました。このお百姓をみんなは小百姓と呼びました。小百姓には雌牛が一頭もいなくて、雌牛を買うお金はなおさらありませんでしたが、小百姓とおかみさんはとても欲しがっていました。ある日、小百姓はおかみさんに言いました。「なあ、いい考えがあるんだ。おれたちの名付け親の指物師がいるだろ。あの人に木の子牛を作ってもらい、他の牛と同じにみえるように茶色に塗ってもらうんだ。そのうちきっと大きくなって雌牛になるよ。」おかみさんもその考えが気に入りました。それで名付け親の指物師は子牛の形に切ってかんなをかけ茶色に塗り、草を食べているように頭を垂れて作りました。

次の朝、雌牛が連れ出されているとき、小百姓は牛飼いを呼びとめて、「なあ、おれにも小さい子牛が一頭あるんだが、まだ小さくて抱いていかなくちゃならないんだ。」と言いました。牛飼いは「いいですよ」と言って子牛を両腕にかかえ、牧草地へ運び、草の中におきました。小さな子牛は食べている牛のようにずっと立ったままでした。それで牛飼いは、「あいつはすぐに自分で走るぞ。見ろよ、もうあんなに食べるんだからな。」と言いました。夜に群れを帰らせるとき、牛飼いは子牛に「そこに立って腹いっぱい食えるんだから、自分の四本足で歩けるよな。おれはまたお前を抱えて帰りたくないよ。」と言いました。

しかし、小百姓は戸口に立って小さな子牛を待っていました。牛飼いが牛たちを追って村を通り抜けたとき、子牛が見当たらないので、小百姓は、うちの子牛はどこだい?と尋ねました。牛飼いは、「まだあそこで食いながら立っていますよ。食うのを止めて帰ろうとしないんです。」と言いました。しかし小百姓は言いました。「なんとまあ、だが、おれの子牛は戻してもらわなくちゃだめだ」そこで二人は牧草地に一緒に出かけましたが、誰かが子牛を盗んでしまっていて、子牛はいませんでした。牛飼いは、「逃げてしまったに違いない」と言いました。しかし小百姓は、「そうは言わせないぞ」と言って、牛飼いを村長の前へ連れていきました。村長は、牛飼いが不注意で子牛を失くしたのだから、逃げた子牛の代わりに雌牛を小百姓にやりなさい、と言いました。

そうして小百姓とおかみさんはずうっと欲しがっていた雌牛を手に入れ、心から喜びました。ところが二人にはえさがなくて雌牛に何も食わせることができませんでした。それでじきに雌牛を殺さなくてはなりませんでした。二人はその肉を塩漬けにし、小百姓は町へ行って皮を売ろうとしました。その受取金で新しい子牛を買おうとしたのです。

途中で水車小屋のそばを通りかかると、翼の折れたカラスがいました。かわいそうに思って、小百姓はそのカラスを拾って皮に包みました。ところが、天気が悪くなり雨風の嵐になったのでもう先へ進めなくなり、水車小屋まで戻って、泊めてくれないかと頼みました。家には粉屋のおかみさんが一人でいて、小百姓に、「そこのわらに寝なさい」と言って、一切れのパンとチーズを渡しました。小百姓はそれを食べ、皮をそはにおいて横になりました。おかみさんは、(あの人、疲れて眠っちゃったわ)と思いました。そのうちに牧師がやってきました。粉屋のおかみさんは喜んで迎えて、「うちの亭主はでかけているわ。だから私たちでご馳走を食べましょう。」と言いました。小百姓は耳をそばだてました。そして二人がご馳走の話をしているのを聞くと、自分は一切れのパンとチーズで間に合わせられたことに腹を立てました。

おかみさんは、焼肉、サラダ、ケーキ、ワインの4つをテーブルに出しました。二人が座って、さあ食べようというときに、外で戸をたたく音がしました。おかみさんは、「あっ、どうしよう、うちの亭主だ。」と言って、焼肉をタイル張りの暖炉へ、ワインを枕の下へ、サラダをベッドの上へ、ケーキをベッドの下へ、牧師を玄関の戸棚へ、急いで隠しました。それから亭主に戸を開けてやり、「よかったわ、あなたが戻ってきて。ひどい嵐ね。まるで世界が終わりになるみたい。」と言いました。粉屋は小百姓がわらにねているのを見て、「あそこでやつは何をしてるんだ?」と尋ねました。「ああ」とおかみさんは言いました。「あの人は、かわいそうに、嵐と雨の中をやってきて、泊めてくれと言ったのよ。だからパンとチーズをあげて、わらがあるところを教えたの。」

亭主は、「おれは別に構わないよ。だけど早く何か食べ物をくれ。」と言いました。おかみさんは、「だけどパンとチーズしかないわ。」と言いました。「何だっていいよ」と亭主は答えました。「おれだったら、パンとチーズでいいよ。」それから小百姓を見て、「こっちへ来て、おれと一緒にもっと食わないか」と言いました。小百姓は二回言われるまでもなく起きあがって食べました。食べたあと、粉屋は、地面にカラスが入っている皮があるのに目をとめて、「あれには何が入ってるんだ?」と尋ねました。小百姓は、「その中に占い師がいるんだ。」と答えました。「何かおれに占ってもらえないか?」と粉屋は言いました。「いいとも」と小百姓は答えました。「だけど、四つのことしか言わなくて、五つ目は言わないんだ。」粉屋は知りたがって、「一度占わせてみてくれ」と言いました。

そこで小百姓がカラスの頭をつまむと、カラスはクルル、クルルというような鳴き声をあげました。「何て言った?」と粉屋が言いました。「先ずはじめに、枕の下にワインが隠されていると言ってるぞ。」と小百姓は言いました。「なんと!」と粉屋は叫び、そこへ行くとワインがありました。「さあ続けてくれ」と粉屋は言いました。小百姓はカラスをまた鳴かせて、「二番目には、タイル張りの暖炉の中に焼肉があるってさ。」と言いました。「これはこれは!」と粉屋は叫び、そこへ行って焼き肉を見つけました。

小百姓はカラスにまだもっと占わせて、「三番目に、ベッドの上にサラダがあるそうだ。」と言いました。「そうならいいんだがね」と粉屋は叫び、そこへ行くとサラダがありました。しまいに小百姓はカラスをもう一回つまんで鳴かせ、「四番目に、ベッドの下にケーキがあるって言ってるぞ。」と言いました。「そうならいいんだがね」と粉屋は叫び、そこを見るとケーキがありました。そうして二人は一緒にテーブルに座りましたが、粉屋のおかみさんは死ぬほどこわくなり、ベッドに行くと全部の鍵をとりました。

粉屋は五番目をとても知りたがりましたが、小百姓は、「まず先に早くこの四つを食べよう。五つ目は悪いものだからな。」と言いました。そこで二人は食べました。そのあと、二人は、五番目の占いに粉屋がいくら出せばよいか取引して、とうとう300ターラーで合意になりました。それから小百姓はカラスの頭をもう一回つまむと、カラスは大声で鳴きました。「何て言った?」と粉屋は尋ねました。「部屋の外の玄関の戸棚に悪魔が隠れているってことだぜ。」と小百姓は答えました。「悪魔は出て行かねばならん」と粉屋は言って、玄関の戸を開けました。

それでおかみさんは鍵束を渡すしかありませんでした。小百姓が戸棚の錠をはずしました。牧師は外へとび出て、一目散に走っていきました。粉屋は「本当だ。おれはこの目で黒いやつをみたぞ。」と言いました。ところで、小百姓は次の朝夜明け前に300ターラーを持ってこっそりずらかりました。家に着くと、小百姓はだんだん始め、きれいな家を建てました。するとお百姓たちは、「小百姓はきっと金の雪が降って、シャベルで何回もすくって金を持ち帰れるところに行ってきたにちがいないぞ。」と言いました。それで小百姓は村長の前に連れて行かれ、財産をどこから手に入れたのか言うように命じられました。小百姓は、「町で雌牛の皮を売ったんです、300ターラーでね。」と答えました。

お百姓たちはそれを聞いて、自分もこの大もうけをしたいと思って、走って家に帰り、雌牛を全部殺して、町でうんと得をして売るために皮を剥ぎました。ところが、村長は、「だけど、うちの召使が先に行かなくちゃならん。」と言いました。召使が町の商人のところに来ると、皮一枚にニターラーより多くはくれませんでした。そして、他の人たちにはそれだけもくれないばかりか、「こんなにたくさんの皮をどうしろっていうんだ?」と言いました。

すると、百姓たちは、小百姓にしてやられたことに腹を立て、仕返しをしようと思い、村長にこのことを訴え出ました。無実の小百姓は全員一致で死刑を言い渡され、穴をいっぱい空けた樽にいれ、川に転がり落とされることになりました。小百姓は引き出され、牧師がつれてこられて小百姓に最期のミサを行うことになりました。他の人たちはみんな遠くにさがらなければなりませんでした。そして小百姓は牧師を見て、粉屋のおかみさんといっしょにいた男だとわかりました。小百姓は牧師に、「おれはお前を戸棚から救い出してやった。今度はおれを樽から救ってくれ」と言いました。

ちょうどこの時に、羊の群れと一緒に来たのは、ずっと前から村長になりたがっていると小百姓が知っている羊飼いでした。そこで小百姓は、ありったけの声を出して叫びました。「嫌だ、そんなことはしないぞ。全世界がやれと言っても絶対やらないぞ。」

羊飼いはそれを聞いて近づいてくると、「どうしようとしてるんだ?何をやらないって?」と尋ねました。小百姓は、「その樽に入りさえすればおれを村長にするってんだ。だけどおれはそんなことをしないぞ。」と言いました。羊飼いは、「村長になるのにたったそれだけでいいんなら、おれはすぐに樽に入るよ。」と言いました。小百姓は、「あんたが入る気なら、あんたが村長になる。」と言いました。羊飼いは承知して、入りました。そして小百姓は上からふたを打ちつけました。

そうして小百姓は羊飼いの羊の群れを自分のものにして追いたてて去りました。牧師は人々のところへいき、ミサは終わったと言いました。そこで人々がやってきて樽を川の方に転がして行きました。樽が転がり出すと、羊飼いは「おれは村長にとてもなりたいんだ」と叫びました。人々は、そう言っているのは小百姓に他ならないと思いこんで、答えました。「おれたちもそう思っているよ。だけどまず下の世界におりて少し見て回ってこさせるぜ。」そうして樽を川に転がして落としました。そのあと、お百姓たちは家に帰っていき村に入って行くと、小百姓も素知らぬ顔で入って来ました。羊の群れを追い立てて、すっかり満足気でした。

それでお百姓たちは驚いて、「小百姓、どこから来たんだ?川から出てきたのか?」と言いました。「そうさ」と小百姓は答えました。「深く、深く沈んでいって、とうとう底に着いたんだ。おれは樽の底を押して這い出たんだ。そうしたら羊がたくさん草を食っているきれいな草原があったよ。そこからこの群れを連れて来たんだ。」「もっといるのか?」とお百姓たちは言いました。「ああ、いるとも。」と小百姓は言いました。「飼いきれないほどたくさんいたよ。」

そこでお百姓たちは、自分たちも羊をとってこよう、一人一群れにしよう、と決めました。しかし、村長は、「おれが最初だ」と言いました。そうしてみんな一緒に川に行きました。ちょうどそのとき、青い空に羊雲と呼ばれている小さな綿雲が出ていて、水にうつっていました。そこでお百姓たちは、「もう下に羊が見えるぞ!」と叫びました。村長が前に進み出て、「おれが先に行くから、見ててくれ。うまくいく見込みがついたら、お前たちを呼ぶよ。」と言いました。そうして村長は飛びこみました。ザブン。水音がしました。それはまるで村長がみんなを呼んでいるように聞こえました。それでみんな一斉に飛び込みました。そうして村の人々はみんな死んでしまい、小百姓はただ一人の跡継ぎだったので金持ちになりました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.