ENGLISH

Brother Lustig

日本語

のんき者


There was one on a time a great war, and when it came to an end, many soldiers were discharged. Then Brother Lustig also received his dismissal, and besides that, nothing but a small loaf of contract-bread, and four kreuzers in money, with which he departed. St. Peter had, however, placed himself in his way in the shape of a poor beggar, and when Brother Lustig came up, he begged alms of him. Brother Lustig replied, "Dear beggar-man, what am I to give you? I have been a soldier, and have received my dismissal, and have nothing but this little loaf of contract-bread, and four kreuzers of money; when that is gone, I shall have to beg as well as you. Still I will give you something." Thereupon he divided the loaf into four parts, and gave the apostle one of them, and a kreuzer likewise. St. Peter thanked him, went onwards, and threw himself again in the soldier's way as a beggar, but in another shape; and when he came up begged a gift of him as before. Brother Lustig spoke as he had done before, and again gave him a quarter of the loaf and one kreuzer. St. Peter thanked him, and went onwards, but for the third time placed himself in another shape as a beggar on the road, and spoke to Brother Lustig. Brother Lustig gave him also the third quarter of bread and the third kreuzer. St. Peter thanked him, and Brother Lustig went onwards, and had but a quarter of the loaf, and one kreuzer. With that he went into an inn, ate the bread, and ordered one kreuzer's worth of beer. When he had had it, he journeyed onwards, and then St. Peter, who had assumed the appearance of a discharged soldier, met and spoke to him thus: "Good day, comrade, canst thou not give me a bit of bread, and a kreuzer to get a drink?" - "Where am I to procure it?" answered Brother Lustig; "I have been discharged, and I got nothing but a loaf of ammunition-bread and four kreuzers in money. I met three beggars on the road, and I gave each of them a quarter of my bread, and one kreuzer. The last quarter I ate in the inn, and had a drink with the last kreuzer. Now my pockets are empty, and if thou also hast nothing we can go a-begging together." - "No," answered St. Peter, "we need not quite do that. I know a little about medicine, and I will soon earn as much as I require by that." - "Indeed," said Brother Lustig, "I know nothing of that, so I must go and beg alone." - "Just come with me," said St. Peter, "and if I earn anything, thou shalt have half of it." - "All right," said Brother Lustig, so they went away together.
Then they came to a peasant's house inside which they heard loud lamentations and cries; so they went in, and there the husband was lying sick unto death, and very near his end, and his wife was crying and weeping quite loudly. "Stop that howling and crying," said St. Peter, "I will make the man well again," and he took a salve out of his pocket, and healed the sick man in a moment, so that he could get up, and was in perfect health. In great delight the man and his wife said, "How can we reward you? What shall we give you?" But St. Peter would take nothing, and the more the peasant folks offered him, the more he refused. Brother Lustig, however, nudged St. Peter, and said, "Take something; sure enough we are in need of it." At length the woman brought a lamb and said to St. Peter that he really must take that, but he would not. Then Brother Lustig gave him a poke in the side, and said, "Do take it, you stupid fool; we are in great want of it!" Then St. Peter said at last, "Well, I will take the lamb, but I won't carry it; if thou wilt insist on having it, thou must carry it." - "That is nothing," said Brother Lustig. "I will easily carry it," and took it on his shoulder. Then they departed and came to a wood, but Brother Lustig had begun to feel the lamb heavy, and he was hungry, so he said to St. Peter, "Look, that's a good place, we might cook the lamb there, and eat it." - "As you like," answered St. Peter, "but I can't have anything to do with the cooking; if thou wilt cook, there is a kettle for thee, and in the meantime I will walk about a little until it is ready. Thou must, however, not begin to eat until I have come back, I will come at the right time." - "Well, go, then," said Brother Lustig, "I understand cookery, I will manage it." Then St. Peter went away, and Brother Lustig killed the lamb, lighted a fire, threw the meat into the kettle, and boiled it. The lamb was, however, quite ready, and the apostle Peter had not come back, so Brother Lustig took it out of the kettle, cut it up, and found the heart. "That is said to be the best part," said he, and tasted it, but at last he ate it all up. At length St. Peter returned and said, "Thou mayst eat the whole of the lamb thyself, I will only have the heart, give me that." Then Brother Lustig took a knife and fork, and pretended to look anxiously about amongst the lamb's flesh, but not to be able to find the heart, and at last he said abruptly, "There is none here." - "But where can it be?" said the apostle. "I don't know," replied Brother Lustig, "but look, what fools we both are, to seek for the lamb's heart, and neither of us to remember that a lamb has no heart!" - "Oh," said St. Peter, "that is something quite new! Every animal has a heart, why is a lamb to have none?" - "No, be assured, my brother," said Brother Lustig, "that a lamb has no heart; just consider it seriously, and then you will see that it really has none." - "Well, it is all right," said St. Peter, "if there is no heart, then I want none of the lamb; thou mayst eat it alone." - "What I can't eat now, I will carry away in my knapsack," said Brother Lustig, and he ate half the lamb, and put the rest in his knapsack.

They went farther, and then St. Peter caused a great stream of water to flow right across their path, and they were obliged to pass through it. Said St. Peter, "Do thou go first." - "No," answered Brother Lustig, "thou must go first," and he thought, "if the water is too deep I will stay behind." Then St. Peter strode through it, and the water just reached to his knee. So Brother Lustig began to go through also, but the water grew deeper and reached to his throat. Then he cried, "Brother, help me!" St. Peter said, "Then wilt thou confess that thou hast eaten the lamb's heart?" - "No," said he, "I have not eaten it." Then the water grew deeper still and rose to his mouth. "Help me, brother," cried the soldier. St. Peter said, "Then wilt thou confess that thou hast eaten the lamb's heart?" - "No," he replied, "I have not eaten it." St. Peter, however, would not let him be drowned, but made the water sink and helped him through it.

Then they journeyed onwards, and came to a kingdom where they heard that the King's daughter lay sick unto death. "Hollo, brother!" said the soldier to St. Peter, "this is a chance for us; if we can heal her we shall be provided for, for life!" But St. Peter was not half quick enough for him, "Come, lift your legs, my dear brother," said he, "that we may get there in time." But St. Peter walked slower and slower, though Brother Lustig did all he could to drive and push him on, and at last they heard that the princess was dead. "Now we are done for!" said Brother Lustig; "that comes of thy sleepy way of walking!" - "Just be quiet," answered St. Peter, "I can do more than cure sick people; I can bring dead ones to life again." - "Well, if thou canst do that," said Brother Lustig, "it's all right, but thou shouldst earn at least half the kingdom for us by that." Then they went to the royal palace, where every one was in great grief, but St. Peter told the King that he would restore his daughter to life. He was taken to her, and said, "Bring me a kettle and some water," and when that was brought, he bade everyone go out, and allowed no one to remain with him but Brother Lustig. Then he cut off all the dead girl's limbs, and threw them in the water, lighted a fire beneath the kettle, and boiled them. And when the flesh had fallen away from the bones, he took out the beautiful white bones, and laid them on a table, and arranged them together in their natural order. When he had done that, he stepped forward and said three times, "In the name of the holy Trinity, dead woman, arise." And at the third time, the princess arose, living, healthy and beautiful. Then the King was in the greatest joy, and said to St. Peter, "Ask for thy reward; even if it were half my kingdom, I would give it thee." But St. Peter said, "I want nothing for it." - "Oh, thou tomfool!" thought Brother Lustig to himself, and nudged his comrade's side, and said, "Don't be so stupid! If thou hast no need of anything, I have." St. Peter, however, would have nothing, but as the King saw that the other would very much like to have something, he ordered his treasurer to fill Brother Lustig's knapsack with gold. Then they went on their way, and when they came to a forest, St. Peter said to Brother Lustig, "Now, we will divide the gold." - "Yes," he replied, "we will." So St. Peter divided the gold, and divided it into three heaps. Brother Lustig thought to himself, "What craze has he got in his head now? He is making three shares, and there are only two of us!" But St. Peter said, "I have divided it exactly; there is one share for me, one for thee, and one for him who ate the lamb's heart."

"Oh, I ate that!" replied Brother Lustig, and hastily swept up the gold. "You may trust what I say." - "But how can that be true," said St. Peter, "when a lamb has no heart?" - "Eh, what, brother, what can you be thinking of? Lambs have hearts like other animals, why should only they have none?" - "Well, so be it," said St. Peter, "keep the gold to yourself, but I will stay with you no longer; I will go my way alone." - "As you like, dear brother," answered Brother Lustig. "Farewell."

Then St. Peter went a different road, but Brother Lustig thought, "It is a good thing that he has taken himself off, he is certainly a strange saint, after all." Then he had money enough, but did not know how to manage it, squandered it, gave it away, and and when some time had gone by, once more had nothing. Then he arrived in a certain country where he heard that a King's daughter was dead. "Oh, ho!" thought he, "that may be a good thing for me; I will bring her to life again, and see that I am paid as I ought to be." So he went to the King, and offered to raise the dead girl to life again. Now the King had heard that a discharged soldier was traveling about and bringing dead persons to life again, and thought that Brother Lustig was the man; but as he had no confidence in him, he consulted his councillors first, who said that he might give it a trial as his daughter was dead. Then Brother Lustig ordered water to be brought to him in a kettle, bade every one go out, cut the limbs off, threw them in the water and lighted a fire beneath, just as he had seen St. Peter do. The water began to boil, the flesh fell off, and then he took the bones out and laid them on the table, but he did not know the order in which to lay them, and placed them all wrong and in confusion. Then he stood before them and said, "In the name of the most holy Trinity, dead maiden, I bid thee arise," and he said this thrice, but the bones did not stir. So he said it thrice more, but also in vain: "Confounded girl that you are, get up!" cried he, "Get up, or it shall be worse for you!" When he had said that, St. Peter suddenly appeared in his former shape as a discharged soldier; he entered by the window and said, "Godless man, what art thou doing? How can the dead maiden arise, when thou hast thrown about her bones in such confusion?" - "Dear brother, I have done everything to the best of my ability," he answered. "This once, I will help thee out of thy difficulty, but one thing I tell thee, and that is that if ever thou undertakest anything of the kind again, it will be the worse for thee, and also that thou must neither demand nor accept the smallest thing from the King for this!" Thereupon St. Peter laid the bones in their right order, said to the maiden three times, "In the name of the most holy Trinity, dead maiden, arise," and the King's daughter arose, healthy and beautiful as before. Then St. Peter went away again by the window, and Brother Lustig was rejoiced to find that all had passed off so well, but was very much vexed to think that after all he was not to take anything for it. "I should just like to know," thought he, "what fancy that fellow has got in his head, for what he gives with one hand he takes away with the other there is no sense whatever in it!" Then the King offered Brother Lustig whatsoever he wished to have, but he did not dare to take anything; however, by hints and cunning, he contrived to make the King order his knapsack to be filled with gold for him, and with that he departed. When he got out, St. Peter was standing by the door, and said, "Just look what a man thou art; did I not forbid thee to take anything, and there thou hast thy knapsack full of gold!" - "How can I help that," answered Brother Lustig, "if people will put it in for me?" - "Well, I tell thee this, that if ever thou settest about anything of this kind again thou shalt suffer for it!" - "Eh, brother, have no fear, now I have money, why should I trouble myself with washing bones?" - "Faith," said St. Peter, "the gold will last a long time! In order that after this thou mayst never tread in forbidden paths, I will bestow on thy knapsack this property, namely, that whatsoever thou wishest to have inside it, shall be there. Farewell, thou wilt now never see me more." - "Good-bye," said Brother Lustig, and thought to himself, "I am very glad that thou hast taken thyself off, thou strange fellow; I shall certainly not follow thee." But of the magical power which had been bestowed on his knapsack, he thought no more.

Brother Lustig travelled about with his money, and squandered and wasted what he had as before. When at last he had no more than four kreuzers, he passed by an inn and thought, "The money must go," and ordered three kreuzers' worth of wine and one kreuzer's worth of bread for himself. As he was sitting there drinking, the smell of roast goose made its way to his nose. Brother Lustig looked about and peeped, and saw that the host had two geese standing in the oven. Then he remembered that his comrade had said that whatsoever he wished to have in his knapsack should be there, so he said, "Oh, ho! I must try that with the geese." So he went out, and when he was outside the door, he said, "I wish those two roasted geese out of the oven and in my knapsack," and when he had said that, he unbuckled it and looked in, and there they were inside it. "Ah, that's right!" said he, "now I am a made man!" and went away to a meadow and took out the roast meat. When he was in the midst of his meal, two journeymen came up and looked at the second goose, which was not yet touched, with hungry eyes. Brother Lustig thought to himself, "One is enough for me," and called the two men up and said, "Take the goose, and eat it to my health." They thanked him, and went with it to the inn, ordered themselves a half bottle of wine and a loaf, took out the goose which had been given them, and began to eat. The hostess saw them and said to her husband, "Those two are eating a goose; just look and see if it is not one of ours, out of the oven." The landlord ran thither, and behold the oven was empty! "What!" cried he, "you thievish crew, you want to eat goose as cheap as that? Pay for it this moment; or I will wash you well with green hazel-sap." The two said, "We are no thieves, a discharged soldier gave us the goose, outside there in the meadow." - "You shall not throw dust in my eyes that way! the soldier was here but he went out by the door, like an honest fellow. I looked after him myself; you are the thieves and shall pay!" But as they could not pay, he took a stick, and cudgeled them out of the house.

Brother Lustig went his way and came to a place where there was a magnificent castle, and not far from it a wretched inn. He went to the inn and asked for a night's lodging, but the landlord turned him away, and said, "There is no more room here, the house is full of noble guests." - "It surprises me that they should come to you and not go to that splendid castle," said Brother Lustig. "Ah, indeed," replied the host, "but it is no slight matter to sleep there for a night; no one who has tried it so far, has ever come out of it alive."

"If others have tried it," said Brother Lustig, "I will try it too."

"Leave it alone," said the host, "it will cost you your neck." - "It won't kill me at once," said Brother Lustig, "just give me the key, and some good food and wine." So the host gave him the key, and food and wine, and with this Brother Lustig went into the castle, enjoyed his supper, and at length, as he was sleepy, he lay down on the ground, for there was no bed. He soon fell asleep, but during the night was disturbed by a great noise, and when he awoke, he saw nine ugly devils in the room, who had made a circle, and were dancing around him. Brother Lustig said, "Well, dance as long as you like, but none of you must come too close." But the devils pressed continually nearer to him, and almost stepped on his face with their hideous feet. "Stop, you devils' ghosts," said he, but they behaved still worse. Then Brother Lustig grew angry, and cried, "Hola! but I will soon make it quiet," and got the leg of a chair and struck out into the midst of them with it. But nine devils against one soldier were still too many, and when he struck those in front of him, the others seized him behind by the hair, and tore it unmercifully. "Devils' crew," cried he, "it is getting too bad, but wait. Into my knapsack, all nine of you!" In an instant they were in it, and then he buckled it up and threw it into a corner. After this all was suddenly quiet, and Brother Lustig lay down again, and slept till it was bright day. Then came the inn-keeper, and the nobleman to whom the castle belonged, to see how he had fared; but when they perceived that he was merry and well they were astonished, and asked, "Have the spirits done you no harm, then?" - "The reason why they have not," answered Brother Lustig, "is because I have got the whole nine of them in my knapsack! You may once more inhabit your castle quite tranquilly, none of them will ever haunt it again." The nobleman thanked him, made him rich presents, and begged him to remain in his service, and he would provide for him as long as he lived. "No," replied Brother Lustig, "I am used to wandering about, I will travel farther." Then he went away, and entered into a smithy, laid the knapsack, which contained the nine devils on the anvil, and asked the smith and his apprentices to strike it. So they smote with their great hammers with all their strength, and the devils uttered howls which were quite pitiable. When he opened the knapsack after this, eight of them were dead, but one which had been lying in a fold of it, was still alive, slipped out, and went back again to hell. Thereupon Brother Lustig travelled a long time about the world, and those who know them can tell many a story about him, but at last he grew old, and thought of his end, so he went to a hermit who was known to be a pious man, and said to him, "I am tired of wandering about, and want now to behave in such a manner that I shall enter into the kingdom of Heaven." The hermit replied, "There are two roads, one is broad and pleasant, and leads to hell, the other is narrow and rough, and leads to heaven." - "I should be a fool," thought Brother Lustig, "if I were to take the narrow, rough road." So he set out and took the broad and pleasant road, and at length came to a great black door, which was the door of Hell. Brother Lustig knocked, and the door-keeper peeped out to see who was there. But when he saw Brother Lustig, he was terrified, for he was the very same ninth devil who had been shut up in the knapsack, and had escaped from it with a black eye. So he pushed the bolt in again as quickly as he could, ran to the devil's lieutenant, and said, "There is a fellow outside with a knapsack, who wants to come in, but as you value your lives don't allow him to enter, or he will wish the whole of hell into his knapsack. He once gave me a frightful hammering when I was inside it." So they called out to Brother Lustig that he was to go away again, for he should not get in there! "If they won't have me here," thought he, "I will see if I can find a place for myself in heaven, for I must be somewhere." So he turned about and went onwards until he came to the door of Heaven, where he knocked. St. Peter was sitting hard by as door-keeper. Brother Lustig recognised him at once, and thought, "Here I find an old friend, I shall get on better." But St. Peter said, "I really believe that thou wantest to come into Heaven." - "Let me in, brother; I must get in somewhere; if they would have taken me into Hell, I should not have come here." - "No," said St. Peter, "thou shalt not enter." - "Then if thou wilt not let me in, take thy knapsack back, for I will have nothing at all from thee." - "Give it here, then," said St. Peter. Then Brother Lustig gave him the knapsack into Heaven through the bars, and St. Peter took it, and hung it beside his seat. Then said Brother Lustig, "And now I wish myself inside my knapsack," and in a second he was in it, and in Heaven, and St. Peter was forced to let him stay there.
昔、大きな戦争があり、戦争が終わるとたくさんの兵士がやめさせられました。そのときにのんき者もくびになり、小さな塊の軍のパン一つと4クロイツァーのお金だけ受け取り、それをもって出かけました。ところが、聖ペテロがあわれな乞食の身なりをして道にいて、のんき者が近づいてくると施しを求めました。のんき者は、「乞食のおっさん、何をやったらいいのかな?おれは兵士だったがクビになってね。この小さな軍のパンと4クロイツァーの金しか無いんだ。それがなくなりゃ、お前さんと同じでおれも乞食になるのさ。まあそれでも、ちっとはあげようか。」と言いました。そう言ってのんき者はパンの塊を4つに分け、使徒にその一つを渡し、一クロイツァーもまたあげました。聖ペテロはお礼を言い、先へ進むと別の身なりの乞食に扮してまた兵士のくる道に出て、兵士がやってくると前と同じように施しを求めました。のんき者は前と同じように話し、またパンを四分の一と一クロイツァーをあげました。聖ペテロはのんき者にお礼を言い、先へ進んでいきましたが、三回目の別の乞食になって道に出て、のんき者に話しかけました。のんき者はまた三度目の四分の一をあげ、三度目の一クロイツァーをあげました。聖ペテロはお礼を言い、のんき者は先へ進みましたが、四分の一のパンと一クロイツァーしか持っていませんでした。

それを持ってのんき者は居酒屋に入り、そのパンを食べ、一クロイツァー分のビールを飲みました。それが終わると、また旅を続けました。すると聖ペテロはクビになった兵士の身なりをしてのんき者に会い、「こんにちは、戦友、パンを少しと飲み物代に一クロイツァーくれないかい?」と声をかけました。「どこから出せばいいんだい?」とのんき者は答えました。「おれはお払い箱になったし、ひと塊の軍のパンと4クロイツァーしかなかったんだ。道で3人の乞食に会って、それぞれにパンを四分の一と一クロイツァーをやったし、居酒屋で最後の四分の一のパンを食べ、最後の一クロイツァーで一杯飲んでしまった。だからおれのポケットはすっからかんというわけさ。あんたもからっけつなら、一緒に乞食をしようぜ。」

「いや」と聖ペテロは答えました。「そこまでしなくていいよ。おれは少し医術の心得があるんだ。それで必要な分はじき稼ぐよ。」「へえ」とのんき者は言いました。「おれはそういうものを何も知らないな。じゃあおれは行って一人で乞食をやらなくちゃ。」「おれと一緒に来いよ」と聖ペテロは言いました。「おれがなにか稼いだら、お前に半分やるよ。」

「いいだろ」とのんき者は言い、二人は一緒にでかけました。そうして、お百姓の家にくると中から大声で嘆いたり泣いたりする声が聞こえてきました。そこで二人が入って行くとそこの亭主が重い病気でもうすぐ死にそうになっていておかみさんが大声で叫んだり泣いたりしていました。「泣き喚くのはやめなさい。」と聖ペテロは言いました。「わたしがまたご主人を元気にしてあげるよ。」そしてポケットから軟膏をとりだし、病気の男をあっという間に治したので、男は起きあがることができ、すっかり元気になりました。

夫婦はとても喜んで、「どうお礼をしたらよろしいでしょう?何をさしあげましょうか?」と言いました。しかし聖ペテロは何も受け取ろうとしませんでした。お百姓の夫婦が言えば言うほど、聖ペテロは固辞しました。ところがのんき者は聖ペテロを肘でつっついて、「おい、なんかもらえよ、おれたちが困っているのははっきりしてるじゃねぇかよ」と言いました。

とうとうおかみさんが子羊を一頭連れてきて、聖ペテロに、これは是非うけとってください、と言いましたが、聖ペテロはどうしても受け取りませんでした。それでのんき者は聖ペテロの脇腹をつついて、「貰えったら。もう、馬鹿だなあ。おれたち、それすごく要るじゃないかよ」と言いました。そこで聖ペテロは、「そうか、子羊はもらうか。でもおれは担がないぞ。お前がどうしても欲しいと言うんだからお前が担ぐんだぞ。」と言いました。「そんなの何でもないさ。簡単に担げるとも。」とのんき者は言って子羊を肩にのせました。

それから二人は出かけて、森へさしかかりましたが、のんき者は子羊が重くなり、お腹がすいてきました。それで聖ペテロに「見ろよ、いい場所だ。あそこで子羊を料理して食べよう。」と言いました。「お前が好きなようにしていいよ」と聖ペテロは答えました。「だがおれは料理に関わることはごめんだ。お前が料理するなら、鍋があるぞ。料理ができるまでおれは少し歩き回ってくるよ。だけどおれが戻るまで食べ始めないでくれよ。いいころに来るからな。」「じゃあ、行けよ。」とのんき者は言いました。「料理ならわかるから、やれるよ。」

それから聖ペテロは出かけて行き、のんき者は子羊を殺し、火をおこして、鍋に肉を放り込み煮ました。ところが子羊がすっかりできても、使徒ペテロは戻りませんでした。のんき者は鍋から肉を取り出して小分けに切っていると、心臓を見つけました。「心臓は一番うまいというよな」とのんき者は言って味見しましたが、とうとうみんな食べてしまいました。やっと聖ペテロが戻ってきて、「羊はお前がみんな食べていいよ、おれは心臓だけ食べるから、心臓をくれよ。」と言いました。

するとのんき者は、ナイフとフォークを手にとって子羊の肉の中を熱心に探しまわり、なかなか心臓を見つけられない振りをし、しまいにぶっきら棒に、「ここにはない」と言いました。「じゃ、いったいどこにあるんだい?」と使徒が言いました。「おれは知らないよ」とのんき者は言いました。「だけど、な、おれたち二人ともバカだよな、子羊の心臓を探すなんてさ、だって子羊ってのは心臓がないんだよな、二人ともそれを思い出さないってんだから。」「はあ!?」と聖ペテロは言いました。「そりゃ初めて聞く話だ。動物にはみんな心臓があるじゃないか、なんで子羊には無いんだ。」「無いんだよ、そいつぁ確かだ。兄き。」とのんき者は言いました。「子羊ってのには心臓がないもんだぜ。よく考えてみろよ、そしたらお前も本当に無いもんだと気づくからさ。」「じゃいいよ」と聖ペテロは言いました。「心臓が無いんなら、子羊はいらない。お前一人で食べていいよ。」「今食いきれないのは、背のうに入れて持って行こう」とのんき者は言って子羊を半分食べ残りを背のうに入れました。

二人はさらに進んでいきました。すると聖ペテロは進む道に大きな川の流れを作り、それを渡らなければいけないようにしました。「お前、先に行けよ」と聖ペテロは言いました。「いや、お前が先だ。」とのんき者は答え、(もし川が深過ぎたら、おれは渡らないでおこう)と考えていました。すると聖ペテロは大股で歩いて渡り、水はちょうど膝のところまできていました。そこでのんき者も渡り出しましたが、水はどんどん深くなって喉まで達しました。それで、「兄きぃ、助けてくれ!」とのんき者は叫びました。聖ペテロは言いました。「じゃあ、子羊の心臓を食ったと白状するか」「いいや」とのんき者は言いました。「おれは食わなかった。」そこで水はますます深くなって口まで上りました。「助けてくれ、兄き」と兵士は叫びました。聖ペテロは言いました。「じゃあ、子羊の心臓を食ったと白状するか?」「いいや」とのんき者はいいました。「おれは食わなかった。」それでも聖ペテロはのんき者を溺れさせる気はないので、水を低くし、のんき者を渡らせてやりました。

それから二人は先へ進んでいき、ある国にさしかかると、王様の娘の病が重く死にそうだと聞きました。「やったぜ、兄き」と兵士は聖ペテロに言いました。「こりゃいい。そのお姫様を治したら、おれたち一生食っていけるよ。」

しかし、聖ペテロはのんき者の半分も速く歩きませんでした。「さあ、兄き、しっかり歩くんだ」と兵士は言いました。「間に合うように着かなくちゃ」ところが、のんき者が必死に追い立て前に押し出しているのに、聖ペテロはだんだんのろくなり、とうとう、王女が死んだ、と聞きました。「ああ、お終いだ」とのんき者は言いました。「お前がぼうっと歩いてるからだぞ。」

「静かにしろよ」と聖ペテロは答えました。「おれができるのは病人を治すだけじゃない。死人も生き返らせることができるんだ。」「へえ、それができるなら、いいんだ。だけどそうやってせめて国の半分は貰ってくれよ。」とのんき者は言いました。そうして二人は王宮に行きました。そこではみんなとても悲しんでいましたが、聖ペテロは王様に、姫を生き返らせてさしあげましょう、と言いました。

聖ペテロは娘のところに案内されると、「釜と水を持って来てくれ」と言いました。釜が運ばれると聖ペテロはみんなに出ていくように告げて、のんき者だけ一緒に残ることを許しました。それから死んだ娘の手足を全部切り取り、水に入れて釜の下に火をたき、それを煮ました。骨から肉が落ちてしまうと、美しい白い骨を取り出してテーブルにおき、元の順番に並べました。それが終わると、聖ペテロは前に進み、「三位一体の名にかけて、死者よ、立ち上がれ」と三回となえました。すると三度目に王女は起き上がり、生き返って、元気で美しくなっていました。

それで王様はこの上ない喜びようで、聖ペテロに「ほうびをとらそう、たとえ国の半分でもわしはいとわぬ。」と言いました。しかし聖ペテロは、「お礼は何も欲しくありません」と言いました。(はあ?この馬鹿が!)とのんき者は思い、仲間の脇腹をつついて、「馬鹿を言うなよ、お前が何も要らなくても、おれは要るよ。」と言いました。それでも聖ペテロは何も貰おうとしませんでした。王様はもう一人がとても物欲しそうにしているのがわかったので、宝物係に命じてのんき者の背のうに金貨を詰めさせました。

そうして二人は進んでいき、森にさしかかると、聖ペテロはのんき者に、「さあ、金貨を分けようぜ」と言いました。「いいとも、やろう」とのんき者は答えました。そこで聖ペテロは金貨を分け、三つの山にしました。それで、のんき者は(こいつ、今度はどんなバカなことを考えてやがるんだ?三人分に分けているぞ、おれたち二人しかいないのによ)と思っていました。しかし、聖ペテロは、「きっちり分けたぞ。一つはおれの分で、一つはお前の分、一つは子羊の心臓を食ったやつの分だ」と言いました。

「ああ、それはおれが食った」とのんき者は答え、さっさとその金貨をさらい、「おれの言うことを信じていいよ」と言いました。「だけど、そんなはずはないだろ?」と聖ペテロは言いました。「子羊ってのは心臓がないのによ」「うん?何、兄き、何を考えているんだ?子羊には他の動物と同じで心臓があるさ。子羊だけ心臓が無いってことはないよ。」「じゃあ、いいよ」と聖ペテロは言いました。「金貨はお前がとっておけよ。だけどおれはもうお前と一緒にいるのはやめるよ。おれは一人で行くよ。」「好きなようにしろよ、兄き」とのんき者は答えました。「じゃあ元気でな」

そうして聖ペテロは別の道を行きましたが、のんき者は(あいつがいなくなってよかったよ。まったく本当に変わった聖者だよ。)と思いました。それでのんき者はたっぷり金貨をもっていましたが、使い道を知らなくて、無駄遣いをしたり人にやったりしてしばらくすると、また何もなくなりました。そうしてある国に着き、王様の娘が死んだと聞きました。

(しめた!)とのんき者は思いました。(こいつはいいぞ。その姫を生き返らせて、相応に金をもらおうではないか)そこで王様のところに出向き、死んだ姫を生き返らせて差し上げましょう、と申し出ました。さて、王様は兵隊あがりがあちこち旅をして死人を蘇らせていると聞いたことがあったので、のんき者がその男だろうと思いました。しかし、信用がならなかったので王様はまず相談役たちに聞いてみました。すると相談役たちは、もう姫は死んでしまったのですから、やらせてみてもよろしいでしょう、と言いました。

そうしてのんき者は水を釜に入れてもってくるように命じ、みんなを出ていかせ、手足を切りとり、水に入れて下で火をたき、聖ペテロがやったのと全く同じにしました。水が煮えたぎり始め、骨から肉がとれました。するとのんき者は骨を取り出しテーブルの上に置きました。しかし、骨を置く順番がわからずみんな間違ってごちゃごちゃに置きました。そうしてその骨の前に立ち、「最も聖い三位一体のみ名において、死者よ、たち上がることを命じる」と言いました。そうしてこれを三回となえました。しかし骨はピクリとも動きませんでした。そこでのんき者はまた三回となえました。が、これもだめでした。「恥ずかしがりやの娘だな、お前は。立てよ!」とのんき者はどなりました。「立てってば!さもないとお前はひどい目にあうぞ!」

のんき者がそう言うと、聖ペテロが前の兵隊あがりの姿で突然現れ、窓から入ってきて、「この罰当りめ!お前、何をやっているんだ?骨をそんなふうにごちゃごちゃにしているのに、どうして死んだ娘が起きあがれるんだよ?」と言いました。「兄き、おれにできることはみんなやったんだ」とのんき者は答えました。「今回だけお前を助けてやるが、一つだけ言っておくぞ。今度こういうことをしたら、お前はひどい目にあうからな、それから、このお礼を王様からほんの少しでも求めたり受け取るんじゃないぞ。」

そう言うと、聖ペテロは骨を正しい順番に並べ、娘に、「最も聖い三位一体のみ名にかけて、死者よ、立ち上がれ」と三回言いました。すると王様の娘は、以前と同じく元気な美しい姿で立ちあがりました。それから聖ペテロはまた窓から出て行きました。のんき者は、やれやれ万事うまくいったぜ、と喜びましたが、結局何も受け取ってはいけないんだっけと思ってかなり機嫌を悪くしました。(ほんとに知りたいもんだよ、あいつの頭はどうなってるんだよな、片方の手でくれるものをもう一方の手でとりあげちまうなんてさ。いったい何を考えているのかさっぱりわからん)と考えました。

それで、王様がのんき者に何でも望みの物をやるぞ、と言いましたが、受け取るわけにはいきませんでした。ところが、いろいろ仄めかしたり抜け目なく謀って王様を仕向け、背のうに金貨をいっぱい詰めさせました。それをもってのんき者はお城を立ち去り、外に出ると、聖ペテロが戸のそばに立っていて、「自分がなんてやつか見てみろ。何も受け取るなと言わなかったか?なのに、お前の背のうは金貨でいっぱいときてる。」と言いました。

「仕方ないじゃないか」とのんき者は答えました。「お城の人たちが無理やり入れるんだからさ。」「言っておくぞ、こういうことを二度とやってみろ、お前はそれで苦しむことになるからな。」「わかったよ、兄き、心配するな、もう金がある。何でいちいち骨を洗おうなんて思うもんか。」「本当だな」と聖ペテロは言いました。「その金貨は長持ちするだろうよ。この後、お前が禁じられた道に踏み込まないように、お前の背のうにこういう性質を授けてやろう、お前がその中に入って欲しいものは何でも入るってな。じゃ元気でな、これからもうお前に会うことは無いぞ。」「さよなら」とのんき者は言って、(お前が行ってしまっておれはとても嬉しいよ。変なやつ。絶対お前のあとについてなんか行かないよ。)と思いました。そうして、自分の背のうに授けられた魔法の力についてはもう何も考えていませんでした。

のんき者はお金を持ってあちこ旅をし、前と同じように無駄遣いをして持っているお金をなくしていきました。とうとう四クロイツァーしかなくなったとき、ある居酒屋を通りがかり、(ええい、この金も使ってしまえ)と思い、三クロイツァ―分のワインと一クロイツァー分のパンを注文しました。そこで座って飲んでいると、焼いたがちょうの匂いが鼻にプーンと漂ってきました。

のんき者は見回して覗きこみ、店の主人が二羽のがちょうをかまどで焼いているのが目に入りました。すると、仲間が背のうに入って欲しいものは何でも入ると言っていたのを思い出し、「そうだ、がちょうであれを試してみなくちゃ」と言いました。そこでのんき者は外に出ると、戸の外で、「二羽の焼いたがちょうはかまどから出ておれの背のうへ入るように」と言いました。言い終わると背のうを開け中を覗きこみました。するとなんと二羽が中に入っていました。「やった、そうこなくっちゃ」とのんき者は言いました。「さあ、これでおれも一丁前だ」そして草原へ行って焼き肉を取り出しました。

のんき者が食べてる最中に二人の旅人が近づいてきて、まだ手をつけていない二つ目のがちょうを物欲しそうな目で見つめました。のんき者は(おれは一羽で十分だ)と思い、二人の男を呼んで「がちょうを持って行って、おれの健康を祝して食べてくれ」と言いました。二人はのんき者に礼を言って、がちょうをもって居酒屋に行き、ワインを半ビンとパンを注文し、貰ったがちょうを出して食べ始めました。

おかみさんが二人を見て亭主に、「あの二人はがちょうを食べているよ。あれがかまどから出したうちのがちょうじゃないか見てきてよ。」と言いました。亭主がそこへ走っていって見ると、かまどは空っぽでした。「何だ、この泥棒仲間め、ただでがちょうを食おうってか。今すぐ金を払え、さもないとはしばみのこん棒でぶちのめしてくれる。」と亭主は叫びました。二人は、「おれたちは泥棒なんかじゃない。あっちの草原でもう辞めた兵士ががちょうをくれたんだ。」と言いました。「そんなんでおれの目はごまかされないぞ。その兵士ならここにいたさ。だけどさっき出て行った、まっとうにな。おれはそいつの後ろを見ていたんだ。お前らが泥棒だ、払ってもらおう。」しかし、二人は払えなかったので亭主は棒をとって二人を店から叩き出しました。

さて、のんき者が進んでいくと、素晴らしい城があるところにさしかかり、そこから遠くないところに粗末な宿屋がありました。のんき者はその宿屋に行き、一晩泊めてくれるよう頼みましたが、宿の主人は断って、「ここはもう部屋がありません。家は身分の高いお客でいっぱいです。」と言いました。「へえ、おどろくね。そのお客があんたのところに来て、あの素晴らしい城に行かないってのは変だね。」とのんき者は言いました。「なるほどそうなんだが」と主人は答えました。「あそこで一晩泊るのはおおごとなんですよ。これまでやってみた人は誰も生きて帰ってこなかったのです。」

「他のやつらがやってみたんなら」とのんき者は言いました。「おれもやってみよう。」「やめときなさいよ」と主人は言いました。「命がなくなりますよ」「すぐには殺さないだろう」とのんき者は言いました。「ちょっと鍵とうまい食べ物とワインをくれよ。」そこで主人はのんき者に鍵と食べ物とワインを渡しました。これを持ってのんき者は城に入って行き、夕食を食べ、しまいに眠くなってきたので、床に寝転がりました。というのはベッドが無かったのです。まもなく寝入りましたが、夜の間に大きな物音で起こされました。目覚めると、部屋に9人の醜い悪魔がいて、輪になってのんき者の周りを踊っていました。

のんき者は、「好きなだけ踊りな、だがあまりおれのそばに近づくな」と言いました。しかし、悪魔たちはだんだん近づいて来て、おぞましい足でのんき者の顔を踏みつけんばかりにしました。「止めろ、この悪魔の化け物ども」とのんき者は言いましたが、悪魔たちはますますひどくなりました。そこでのんき者は腹を立て、「止めろ!じきにおとなしくさせてやるぞ」と叫んで、椅子の脚をとり、悪魔たちの真ん中に打ちつけました。しかし一人の兵士対九人の悪魔では相手が多すぎて、前にいるやつらをなぐっていると他のやつらが後ろから髪をつかみ情け容赦なく引っ張りました。

「悪魔ども!」とのんき者はどなりました。「これは我慢ならん。だが待ってろよ。お前たち9人とも背のうの中へ入れ」途端に悪魔は背のうの中に入ってしまいました。そこでのんき者は背のうを閉め、すみに放り投げました。このあと、急にしーんとなったのでのんき者はまた横になり、すっかり明るくなるまで眠りました。すると宿の主人と城の持ち主の貴族が、どうなったかみようと、やってきました。のんき者が機嫌よく元気にしているのを見ると驚いて、「じゃあ、化け物はあんたに悪さをしなかったのか?」と尋ねました。「しなかったのは」とのんき者は答えました。「私がそいつら9人とも背のうに入れたからですよ。あなたはまた静かにお城に住めますよ。もう二度と化け物はでてこないでしょう。」貴族はのんき者に礼を言い、たっぷり贈り物をして、このまま自分に仕えてくれないか、と頼み、生きてる限り暮らしの面倒をみようと言いました。「いや、私はあちこち旅をすることに慣れているのでまた旅を続けます」とのんき者は答えました。

そうしてのんき者は立ち去り、鍛冶屋に入って、9人の悪魔が入っている背のうをかなとこの上に置き、鍛冶屋と職人たちに打ってくれるよう頼みました。そこでみんなは大きなハンマーで力いっぱい叩きました。それで悪魔たちはとてもあわれな吠え声をあげました。このあとのんき者が背のうを開けると、8人は死んでいましたが、背のうのひだに入っていた一人がまだ生きていて、すっと抜け出て地獄へ戻りました。

それからのんき者は長い間世間を歩き回り、知っている人たちはたくさんの話を語れますが、とうとうのんき者も年をとって、死ぬ時のことを考えました。そこで信心深い人で知られている隠者のところへ行き、「私は旅歩きが嫌になり、今は天国に入れるように振る舞いたいと思っています。」と言いました。隠者は、「二つの道があって、一つは広くて楽な道で地獄に通じている。もう一つは狭く苦しい道で天国に通じているのだ。」と答えました。のんき者は(狭く苦しい道へ行くとすればおれは馬鹿だよ)と考えました。

そこでのんき者は出かけて広く楽な道を行き、とうとう大きな黒い門に着きました。それは地獄の門でした。のんき者が門をたたくと、門番は誰がいるのかみようと外を覗きました。しかし、のんき者を見ると、門番はぎょっとしました。というのは、その門番こそ、背のうに閉じ込められあざだらけになって逃げたあの九番目の悪魔だったからです。それで門番はぱっと素早く門にまたかんぬきをかけ、最上位の悪魔のところへ駆けていき、「そとに背のうを背負った男が来て、入ろうとしています。しかし、命が大切でしたら、やつを入れてはいけません。さもないとやつは願かけして、地獄全部を背のうに入れてしまいます。昔、私が背のうの中に入っていたときハンマーでひどく打たれました。」と言いました。

そこで地獄ではのんき者に、ここに入れられないから立ち去れ、とどなりました。(ここに入れてくれないんなら)とのんき者は考えました。(天国に居場所を見つけられるかやってみよう。おれはどこかにいる場所がなくてはいけないのだからな)

そこでのんき者は向きを変えて進んでいき、とうとう天国の門にやってくると、門をたたきました。聖ペテロが門番をしてすぐ近くに座っていました。のんき者は聖ペテロの顔を見てすぐわかり、(ここで昔なじみを見つけるとはうまくいきそうだ)と思いました。しかし聖ペテロは「お前が天国に入りたがるとは信じられないよ」と言いました。「入れてくれ、兄き、おれはどこかへ入らなくちゃならない。地獄で入れてくれたら、ここには来なかったよ。」「だめだ」と聖ペテロは言いました。「お前は入れない。」「じゃあ、どうしても入れてくれないなら、背のうを返すよ。お前から何ももらう気はないから。」「じゃあ、こっちへ寄こせ。」と聖ペテロは言いました。そこでのんき者は格子の間から背のうを天国に入れて聖ペテロに渡し、聖ペテロはそれを受け取って自分の椅子のそばにかけました。するとのんき者は「今度はおれが背のうに入るように」と言いました。あっという間にのんき者は背のうの中に、つまり、天国の中にいました。そうして聖ペテロはしかたなくのんき者を天国においてやりました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.