ENGLISH

Hans in luck

日本語

幸せハンス


Hans had served his master for seven years, so he said to him, "Master, my time is up; now I should be glad to go back home to my mother; give me my wages." The master answered, "You have served me faithfully and honestly; as the service was so shall the reward be;" and he gave Hans a piece of gold as big as his head. Hans pulled his handkerchief out of his pocket, wrapped up the lump in it, put it on his shoulder, and set out on the way home.
As he went on, always putting one foot before the other, he saw a horseman trotting quickly and merrily by on a lively horse. "Ah!" said Hans quite loud, "what a fine thing it is to ride! There you sit as on a chair; you stumble over no stones, you save your shoes, and get on, you don't know how."

The rider, who had heard him, stopped and called out, "Hollo! Hans, why do you go on foot, then?"

"I must," answered he, "for I have this lump to carry home; it is true that it is gold, but I cannot hold my head straight for it, and it hurts my shoulder."

"I will tell you what," said the rider, "we will exchange: I will give you my horse, and you can give me your lump."

"With all my heart," said Hans, "but I can tell you, you will have to crawl along with it."

The rider got down, took the gold, and helped Hans up; then gave him the bridle tight in his hands and said, "If you want to go at a really good pace, you must click your tongue and call out, "Jup! Jup!"

Hans was heartily delighted as he sat upon the horse and rode away so bold and free. After a little while he thought that it ought to go faster, and he began to click with his tongue and call out, "Jup! Jup!" The horse put himself into a sharp trot, and before Hans knew where he was, he was thrown off and lying in a ditch which separated the field from the highway. The horse would have gone off too if it had not been stopped by a countryman, who was coming along the road and driving a cow before him.

Hans got his limbs together and stood up on his legs again, but he was vexed, and said to the countryman, "It is a poor joke, this riding, especially when one gets hold of a mare like this, that kicks and throws one off, so that one has a chance of breaking one's neck. Never again will I mount it. Now I like your cow, for one can walk quietly behind her, and have, over and above, one's milk, butter and cheese every day without fail. What would I not give to have such a cow." - "Well," said the countryman, "if it would give you so much pleasure, I do not mind giving the cow for the horse." Hans agreed with the greatest delight; the countryman jumped upon the horse, and rode quickly away.

Hans drove his cow quietly before him, and thought over his lucky bargain. "If only I have a morsel of bread -- and that can hardly fail me -- I can eat butter and cheese with it as often as I like; if I am thirsty, I can milk my cow and drink the milk. Good heart, what more can I want?"

When he came to an inn he made a halt, and in his great content ate up what he had with him -- his dinner and supper -- and all he had, and with his last few farthings had half a glass of beer. Then he drove his cow onwards along the road to his mother's village.

As it drew nearer mid-day, the heat was more oppressive, and Hans found himself upon a moor which it took about an hour to cross. He felt it very hot and his tongue clave to the roof of his mouth with thirst. "I can find a cure for this," thought Hans; "I will milk the cow now and refresh myself with the milk." He tied her to a withered tree, and as he had no pail he put his leather cap underneath; but try as he would, not a drop of milk came. And as he set himself to work in a clumsy way, the impatient beast at last gave him such a blow on his head with its hind foot, that he fell on the ground, and for a long time could not think where he was.

By good fortune a butcher just then came along the road with a wheel-barrow, in which lay a young pig. "What sort of a trick is this?" cried he, and helped the good Hans up. Hans told him what had happened. The butcher gave him his flask and said, "Take a drink and refresh yourself. The cow will certainly give no milk, it is an old beast; at the best it is only fit for the plough, or for the butcher." - "Well, well," said Hans, as he stroked his hair down on his head, "who would have thought it? Certainly it is a fine thing when one can kill a beast like that at home; what meat one has! But I do not care much for beef, it is not juicy enough for me. A young pig like that now is the thing to have, it tastes quite different; and then there are the sausages!"

"Hark ye, Hans," said the butcher, "out of love for you I will exchange, and will let you have the pig for the cow." - "Heaven repay you for your kindness!" said Hans as he gave up the cow, whilst the pig was unbound from the barrow, and the cord by which it was tied was put in his hand.

Hans went on, and thought to himself how everything was going just as he wished; if he did meet with any vexation it was immediately set right. Presently there joined him a lad who was carrying a fine white goose under his arm. They said good morning to each other, and Hans began to tell of his good luck, and how he had always made such good bargains. The boy told him that he was taking the goose to a christening-feast. "Just lift her," added he, and laid hold of her by the wings; "how heavy she is -- she has been fattened up for the last eight weeks. Whoever has a bit of her when she is roasted will have to wipe the fat from both sides of his mouth." - "Yes," said Hans, as he weighed her in one hand, "she is a good weight, but my pig is no bad one."

Meanwhile the lad looked suspiciously from one side to the other, and shook his head. "Look here," he said at length, "it may not be all right with your pig. In the village through which I passed, the Mayor himself had just had one stolen out of its sty. I fear -- I fear that you have got hold of it there. They have sent out some people and it would be a bad business if they caught you with the pig; at the very least, you would be shut up in the dark hole."

The good Hans was terrified. "Goodness!" he said, "help me out of this fix; you know more about this place than I do, take my pig and leave me your goose." - "I shall risk something at that game," answered the lad, "but I will not be the cause of your getting into trouble." So he took the cord in his hand, and drove away the pig quickly along a by-path.

The good Hans, free from care, went homewards with the goose under his arm. "When I think over it properly," said he to himself, "I have even gained by the exchange; first there is the good roast-meat, then the quantity of fat which will drip from it, and which will give me dripping for my bread for a quarter of a year, and lastly the beautiful white feathers; I will have my pillow stuffed with them, and then indeed I shall go to sleep without rocking. How glad my mother will be!"

As he was going through the last village, there stood a scissors-grinder with his barrow; as his wheel whirred he sang --

"I sharpen scissors and quickly grind,
My coat blows out in the wind behind."
Hans stood still and looked at him; at last he spoke to him and said, "All's well with you, as you are so merry with your grinding." - "Yes," answered the scissors-grinder, "the trade has a golden foundation. A real grinder is a man who as often as he puts his hand into his pocket finds gold in it. But where did you buy that fine goose?"
"I did not buy it, but exchanged my pig for it."

"And the pig?"

"That I got for a cow."

"And the cow?"

"I took that instead of a horse."

"And the horse?"

"For that I gave a lump of gold as big as my head."

"And the gold?"

"Well, that was my wages for seven years' service."

"You have known how to look after yourself each time," said the grinder. "If you can only get on so far as to hear the money jingle in your pocket whenever you stand up, you will have made your fortune."

"How shall I manage that?" said Hans. "You must be a grinder, as I am; nothing particular is wanted for it but a grindstone, the rest finds itself. I have one here; it is certainly a little worn, but you need not give me anything for it but your goose; will you do it?"

"How can you ask?" answered Hans. "I shall be the luckiest fellow on earth; if I have money whenever I put my hand in my pocket, what need I trouble about any longer?" and he handed him the goose and received the grindstone in exchange. "Now," said the grinder, as he took up an ordinary heavy stone that lay by him, "here is a strong stone for you into the bargain; you can hammer well upon it, and straighten your old nails. Take it with you and keep it carefully."

Hans loaded himself with the stones, and went on with a contented heart; his eyes shone with joy. "I must have been born with a caul," he cried; "everything I want happens to me just as if I were a Sunday-child."

Meanwhile, as he had been on his legs since daybreak, he began to feel tired. Hunger also tormented him, for in his joy at the bargain by which he got the cow he had eaten up all his store of food at once. At last he could only go on with great trouble, and was forced to stop every minute; the stones, too, weighed him down dreadfully. Then he could not help thinking how nice it would be if he had not to carry them just then.

He crept like a snail to a well in a field, and there he thought that he would rest and refresh himself with a cool draught of water, but in order that he might not injure the stones in sitting down, he laid them carefully by his side on the edge of the well. Then he sat down on it, and was to stoop and drink, when he made a slip, pushed against the stones, and both of them fell into the water. When Hans saw them with his own eyes sinking to the bottom, he jumped for joy, and then knelt down, and with tears in his eyes thanked God for having shown him this favour also, and delivered him in so good a way, and without his having any need to reproach himself, from those heavy stones which had been the only things that troubled him.

"There is no man under the sun so fortunate as I," he cried out. With a light heart and free from every burden he now ran on until he was with his mother at home.
ハンスは主人に七年仕えました。それで主人に「だんなさま、年季が明けました。もうくにの母のところに帰りたいんです。お手当をください。」と言いました。主人は「お前はかげひなたなくよく働いてくれた。それだけちゃんと手当てもはずむぞ。」と答えて、ハンスに頭と同じくらい大きい金の塊を渡しました。ハンスはポケットからハンカチを引っ張り出し、その塊を包んで肩にかけ、故郷に帰りはじめました。

足を交互に出しながら進んでいくと、馬に乗った人が目にとまりました。元気のよい馬に乗って速く楽しそうに走っていくのです。「いいなあ!」とハンスは大声で言いました。「馬で行くってなんていいんだろう。椅子に座っているようにして、石につまずかないし、靴は擦り減らないし、それで知らないうちに先へ進むんだもんなあ。」馬の乗り手はその声が聞こえて止まり、「やあ、ハンス、じゃどうして歩いているんだい?」とさけびました。「歩かなくちゃいけないんですよ。」とハンスは答えました。「この塊を家に持って行くもんでね。確かに金なんだけど、このせいで頭をまっすぐにあげられないし、肩は痛いし。」「なあ」と乗り手が言いました。「取り変えようか。お前に馬をやろう、お前はその塊を私にくれよ。」「喜んで」とハンスは言いました。「だけど言っておきますよ、あんたはこの塊を這いつくばって運ばなくちゃなりませんよ。」乗り手は降りて金を受け取り、ハンスを馬に乗せ、手に手綱をしっかり持たせ、「本当に速く進みたければ、舌を鳴らして、ハイッハイッとどなるんだ」と言いました。

ハンスは馬にまたがり力強く自由に進んでいくと心から嬉しくなりました。少し経って、もっと速く行かなくちゃと思って、舌を鳴らし、「ハイッハイッ」と怒鳴りました。馬は急に速足になり、ハンスは何が何だか分からないうちに投げ出され、畑と道をわけている溝にのびていました。牛を追いたてて道をやってきた村人が止めてくれなかったら、馬はどこまでも行ってしまったでしょう。

ハンスは手足をそろえるとまた立ちあがりましたがご機嫌斜めになって、村人に言いました。「下手な冗談と同じで面白くもない、この馬に乗るってのは。特にこんな馬に乗るのはな。蹴飛ばしたり振り落としたりして、下手すりゃ首の骨を折るってもんだ。僕は二度と馬にのらないぞ。そうするとあんたの牛はいいねえ。静かに後ろを歩いていけるんだから。それで何よりも乳や、バターやチーズが毎日間違いなく取れる。そんな牛をもらえるんだったら何だってあげちゃうよ。」「そうか」と村人は言いました。「そんなに牛が欲しいんなら、牛と馬を取り替えたっていいよ。」ハンスは大喜びで承知しました。村人は馬に飛び乗ってさっさと行ってしまいました。

ハンスは静かに牛を追いたてて、うまくいった取引のことを考えました。(パンが一切れあれば、しかもパンが無いということはない、好きなだけバターとチーズが食べられる、喉が渇けば、牛の乳を搾って飲める。これ以上いうことはないよな)

宿屋にやってくるとハンスは止まって、大いに満足して、昼食も夕食もあるものみんな食べてしまい、持っていたものもみんな、つまり最後のファージングもコップに半分のビールを飲んでつかってしまいました。それから牛を追いたてて母親の村へと道を進んでいきました。

昼に近づくにつれて、暑さがますますひどくなってきて、ハンスはこえるのに一時間ほどかかる荒れ野にきていました。熱くて熱くて喉が渇き舌が上あごにくっつきました。(これは治せるぞ)とハンスは考えました。(さあ乳をしぼってミルクで元気をつけよう)枯れ木に牛をつなぎ、桶がなかったので、下に革の帽子を置きました。しかし、どんなに搾ってもミルクは一滴も出てきませんでした。しかもやり方が下手くそなので、いらいらした牛はとうとうハンスの頭を後ろ足でガツンと蹴ったので、ハンスは地面に倒れ、しばらく自分がどこにいるのかわかりませんでした。

ちょうどそのとき運よく肉屋が手押し車に子豚をのせて道をやってきました。「こりゃどうしたんだい?」と肉屋は叫んで、お人よしのハンスを助け起こしました。ハンスは肉屋に何があったか話しました。肉屋はハンスに自分のビンを渡し、「一口飲んで元気をつけな。この牛はたしかにミルクを出さないだろうな。年をとってるからね。せいぜい農耕用か肉用にしか適さないよ。」と言いました。「おやおや」とハンスは頭の髪の毛を撫でおろしながら言いました。「そんなことは思ってもみなかったなあ。家でそんな牛を殺したら確かにいいだろうな、どんなに肉がとれるだろう。だけど牛肉はあまり好きじゃないな、僕には汁気が足りないもの。そんな子豚ならいいだろうね。味が全然違う。それにソーセージもできるしね。」

「いいかい、ハンス」と肉屋は言いました。「あんたのためなんだが、取り替えてやるよ。牛の代わりに豚を持っていっていいよ。」「あんたの親切にはきっといいことがありますよ。」とハンスは牛を渡して言いました。一方肉屋は豚を手押し車からおろし、つないでいた紐をハンスの手に渡しました。

ハンスは進んでいき、心の中で、何でも思い通りにいくなあ、困ったことがあればすぐにちゃんとなるなあ、と考えていました。まもなく脇に見事な白いがちょうをかかえた若者と一緒になりました。二人はこんにちはと挨拶を交わし、ハンスは自分の幸運のことを話し始め、いつもうまい取引をしてきたと話しました。その若者はがちょうを洗礼の祝いに持って行くところだ、と話しました。「ちょっと持ち上げてみろよ」と若者は行ってがちょうの羽をもちました。「すごく重いんだぜ。この8週間太らせてきたからね。焼き肉にしてこいつを一口食べたら口の両端から垂れる脂肪を拭わなくちゃいけないだろうよ」「そうだね」と片手で重さをはかりながらハンスは言いました。「確かに重いね、でも僕の豚だって悪くないよ」

そのうちに若者は疑わしそうにためつすがめつ豚を見まわして首を振りました。しまいに「ねえ」と若者は言いました。「君の豚は大丈夫じゃないかもしれないよ。僕が通って来た村では村長さんまで小屋から豚が盗まれたばかりだ。悪いけど‐‐悪いけどこれはその豚だと思うよ。人を出して豚を探しまわっているから、君がその豚をもっているところをつかまったら、ひどいことになるだろうね。少なくとも暗い穴に閉じ込められるんじゃないかな。」

お人よしのハンスはびくつき、「大変だ!」と言いました。「助けてくれよ。君は僕よりこの辺のことを知ってる。僕の豚を受け取って、君のがちょうをくれないか。」「すると僕がその豚で危なくなるな」と若者は答えました。「だけど僕のせいで君を面倒に巻き込みたくもないしなあ。」そうして若者は豚の紐を受け取り、脇道を通ってそそくさと豚を追いたてて行ってしまいました。

お人よしのハンスは心配がなくなり、がちょうを脇に抱えて家へ向かいました。「よくよく考えてみると」とハンスは独り言を言いました。「取り替えて得をしたよ。第一にうまい焼き肉があるし、次に垂れてくる脂肪だろ、まあ三か月はパンに塗る分あるだろう。最後に美しい白い羽根だ、枕に詰めてもらおう、そうすりゃ揺らさなくても眠れるよ。おふくろは喜ぶそ。」

最後の村を通り抜けているとき、手押し車をとめた鋏の研ぎ屋がいました。砥石車を回しながら男は歌いました。

「おれは鋏を砥いで切れ味をよくする、おれの上着に風が吹く」ハンスは立ち止まって男をみて、ついに話しかけました。「万事うまくいってるんだね、あんたは研ぎながらとても楽しそうだ」「そうとも」と研ぎ屋は答えました。「身につけたわざには金の土台があるんだ。本物の研ぎ屋というのはポケットに手を入れるたびに金貨があるって男だよ。ところでそのすてきながちょうはどこで買ったんだい?」「買ったんじゃないよ。豚と取り替えたんだ。」
「で豚は?」「牛と取り替えた」
「で牛は?」「馬のかわりにもらったのさ」
「で馬は?」「馬をもらうのに僕の頭くらいの金の塊を渡したんだ」
「でその金は?」「うん、それは僕が七年務めた給金だったよ」

「へえ、「取り替えるたびによく知っていたんだね」と研ぎ屋は言いました。「立ち上がるたびにポケットで金がチャリチャリいうのを聞けるほどやれれば、財産ができたのにね。」
「それにはどうしたらいいの?」とハンスは言いました。「おれのように研ぎ屋にならなくちゃ。研ぎ屋には砥石の他は特に何もいらないよ、他はひとりでに見つかるのさ。砥石はここにある。確かにすこし擦り減っているが、この砥石の代わりにあんたのがちょうだけでいいよ。取り替えるかい?」
「聞くまでも無いよ」とハンスは答えました。「僕はこの世で一番運がいいな。ポケットに手をいれるたびにお金があるんなら、もうくよくよすることは何もないものね。」そしてハンスは研ぎ屋にがちょうを渡し、代わりに砥石を受け取りました。「ほら」と研ぎ屋は言って、そばに転がっていた普通の重い石を持ち上げ、「おまけにここに強い石があるよ。この上でよくたたいて、古い釘をまっすぐにできるぜ。一緒に持って行って、大事にとっとけよ。」

ハンスは石を持って、満足して進んでいきました。ハンスの目は喜びで輝いていました。「僕は幸せの帽子をかぶって生まれたに違いない。」とハンスは叫びました。「何だって望んだようにことが運ぶんだもの、まるで日曜日の子供みたいだ。」

そのうちに、夜明けから歩いていたので、疲れはじめました。おまけにお腹もすいてたまらなくなりました。というのは牛を手に入れた取引で、嬉しさのあまりとっておいた食べ物を一度に食べてしまったからです。とうとう、ひいひいいいながらやっと進んで、一分ごとに立ち止まるしかなくなりました。石も恐ろしく重くのしかかりました。そうして、石を運ばなくてよければどんなにいいだろう、とハンスは考えざるを得ませんでした。

ハンスは野原の井戸にかたつむりのように這っていき、冷たい水を飲んで休み元気を取り戻そうと思いました。ところが座るとき石を傷つけないように自分のそばの井戸の縁に注意して置き、かがみこんで飲もうとしたら手がすべって石を押してしまい、二個とも水の中へ落ちてしまいました。ハンスは自分の目で石が底に沈んでいくのをみたとき、喜んで跳びはねました。それから膝まづいて、目に涙をためながら神様に感謝して、こんなふうにお恵みを示してくださり有難うございました、私を苦しめていたただ一つのものからとてもうまく救ってくださいました、おかげさまで自分を責めなくて済みました、と言いました。

「僕のように運がいいやつは日の下にいないよ。」とハンスは叫びました。心も軽くすべての重荷から解放されて、今度はハンスは走って家にいる母親に会いにゆきました。




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