ENGLISH

The goose girl

PORTUGUÊS

A pastorinha de gansos


There lived once an old Queen, whose husband had been dead many years. She had a beautiful daughter who was promised in marriage to a King's son living a great way off. When the time appointed for the wedding drew near, and the old Queen had to send her daughter into the foreign land, she got together many costly things, furniture and cups and jewels and adornments, both of gold and silver, everything proper for the dowry of a royal Princess, for she loved her daughter dearly. She gave her also a waiting gentlewoman to attend her and to give her into the bridegroom's hands; and they were each to have a horse for the journey, and the Princess's horse was named Falada, and he could speak. When the time for parting came, the old Queen took her daughter to her chamber, and with a little knife she cut her own finger so that it bled; and she held beneath it a white napkin, and on it fell three drops of blood; and she gave it to her daughter, bidding her take care of it, for it would be needful to her on the way.

Then they took leave of each other; and the Princess put the napkin in her bosom, got on her horse, and set out to go to the bridegroom. After she had ridden an hour, she began to feel very thirsty, and she said to the waiting-woman, "Get down, and fill my cup that you are carrying with water from the brook; I have great desire to drink." - "Get down yourself," said the waiting-woman, "and if you are thirsty stoop down and drink; I will not be your slave." And as her thirst was so great, the Princess had to get down and to stoop and drink of the water of the brook, and could not have her gold cup to serve her. "Oh dear!" said the poor Princess. And the three drops of blood heard her, and said, "If your mother knew of this, it would break her heart." But the Princess answered nothing, and quietly mounted her horse again. So they rode on some miles farther; the day was warm, the sun shone hot, and the Princess grew thirsty once more. And when they came to a water-course she called again to the waiting-woman and said, "Get down, and give me to drink out of my golden cup." For she had forgotten all that had gone before. But the waiting-woman spoke still more scornfully and said, "If you want a drink, you may get it yourself; I am not going to be your slave." So, as her thirst was so great, the Princess had to get off her horse and to stoop towards the running water to drink, and as she stooped, she wept and said, "Oh dear!" And the three drops of blood heard her and answered, "If your mother knew of this, it would break her heart!" And as she drank and stooped over, the napkin on which were the three drops of blood fell out of her bosom and floated down the stream, and in her distress she never noticed it; not so the waiting-woman, who rejoiced because she should have power over the bride, who, now that she had lost the three drops of blood, had become weak, and unable to defend herself. And when she was going to mount her horse again the waiting-woman cried, "Falada belongs to me, and this jade to you." And the Princess had to give way and let it be as she said. Then the waiting-woman ordered the Princess with many hard words to take off her rich clothing and to put on her plain garments, and then she made her swear to say nothing of the matter when they came to the royal court; threatening to take her life if she refused. And all the while Falada noticed and remembered.

The waiting-woman then mounting Falada, and the Princess the sorry jade, they journeyed on till they reached the royal castle. There was great joy at their coming, and the King's son hastened to meet them, and lifted the waiting woman from her horse, thinking she was his bride; and then he led her up the stairs, while the real Princess had to remain below. But the old King, who was looking out of the window, saw her standing in the yard, and noticed how delicate and gentle and beautiful she was, and then he went down and asked the seeming bride who it was that she had brought with her and that was now standing in the courtyard.

"Oh!" answered the bride, "I only brought her with me for company; give the maid something to do, that she may not be for ever standing idle." But the old King had no work to give her; until he bethought him of a boy he had who took care of the geese, and that she might help him. And so the real Princess was sent to keep geese with the goose-boy, who was called Conrad.

Soon after the false bride said to the Prince, "Dearest husband, I pray thee do me a pleasure." - "With all my heart," answered he. "Then "said she, "send for the knacker, that he may carry off the horse I came here upon, and make away with him; he was very troublesome to me on the journey." For she was afraid that the horse might tell how she had behaved to the Princess. And when the order had been given that Falada should die, it came to the Princess's ears, and she came to the knacker's man secretly, and promised him a piece of gold if he would do her a service. There was in the town a great dark gate-way through which she had to pass morning and evening with her geese, and she asked the man to take Falada's head and to nail it on the gate, that she might always see it as she passed by. And the man promised, and he took Falada's head and nailed it fast in the dark gate-way.

Early next morning as she and Conrad drove their geese through the gate, she said as she went by:

"O Falada, dost thou hang there?"

And the head answered:

"Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain."

But she went on through the town, driving her geese to the field. And when they came into the meadows, she sat down and undid her hair, which was all of gold, and when Conrad saw how it glistened, he wanted to pull out a few hairs for himself. And she said:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
Make him run after as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And twist it up
in seemly wise."

Then there came a wind strong enough to blow Conrad's hat far away over the fields, and he had to run after it; and by the time he came back she had put up her hair with combs and pins, and he could not get at any to pull it out; and he was sulky and would not speak to her; so they looked after the geese until the evening came, and then they went home.

The next morning, as they passed under the dark gate-way, the Princess said:

"O Falada, dost thou hang there?"

And Falada answered:

"Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain."

And when they reached the fields she sat down and began to comb out her hair; then Conrad came up and wanted to seize upon some of it, and she cried:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
Make him run after as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And do it up
in seemly wise."

Then the wind came and blew Conrad's hat very far away, so that he had to run after it, and when he came back again her hair was put up again, so that he could pull none of it out; and they tended the geese until the evening.

And after they had got home, Conrad went to the old King and said: "I will tend the geese no longer with that girl!" - "Why not?" asked the old King. "Because she vexes me the whole day long," answered Conrad. Then the old King ordered him to tell how it was. "Every morning," said Conrad, "as we pass under the dark gate-way with the geese, there is an old horse's head hanging on the wall, and she says to it:

'O Falada, dost thou hang there?'

And the head answers:

'Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain.'"

And besides this, Conrad related all that happened in the fields, and how he was obliged to run after his hat.

The old King told him to go to drive the geese next morning as usual, and he himself went behind the gate and listened how the maiden spoke to Falada; and then he followed them into the fields, and hid himself behind a bush; and he watched the goose-boy and the goose-girl tend the geese; and after a while he saw the girl make her hair all loose, and how it gleamed and shone. Soon she said:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
And make him follow as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And bind it up
in seemly wise."

Then there came a gust of wind and away went Conrad's hat, and he after it, while the maiden combed and bound up her hair; and the old King saw all that went on. At last he went unnoticed away, and when the goose-girl came back in the evening he sent for her, and asked the reason of her doing all this. "That I dare not tell you," she answered, "nor can I tell any man of my woe, for when I was in danger of my life I swore an oath not to reveal it." And he pressed her sore, and left her no peace, but he could get nothing out of her. At last he said, "If you will not tell it me, tell it to the iron oven," and went away. Then she crept into the iron oven, and began to weep and to lament, and at last she opened her heart and said, "Here I sit forsaken of all the world, and I am a King's daughter, and a wicked waiting-woman forced me to give up my royal garments and my place at the bridegroom's side, and I am made a goose-girl, and have to do mean service. And if my mother knew, it would break her heart." Now the old King was standing outside by the oven-door listening, and he heard all she said, and he called to her and told her to come out of the oven. And he caused royal clothing to be put upon her, and it was a marvel to see how beautiful she was. The old King then called his son and proved to him that he had the wrong bride, for she was really only a waiting-woman, and that the true bride was here at hand, she who had been the goose-girl. The Prince was glad at heart when he saw her beauty and gentleness; and a great feast was made ready, and all the court people and good friends were bidden to it. The bridegroom sat in the midst with the Princess on one side and the waiting-woman on the other; and the false bride did not know the true one, because she was dazzled with her glittering braveries. When all the company had eaten and drunk and were merry, the old King gave the waiting-woman a question to answer, as to what such an one deserved, who had deceived her masters in such and such a manner, telling the whole story, and ending by asking, "Now, what doom does such an one deserve?" - "No better than this," answered the false bride, "that she be put naked into a cask, studded inside with sharp nails, and be dragged along in it by two white horses from street to street, until she be dead." - "Thou hast spoken thy own doom," said the old King, "as thou hast said, so shall it be done." And when the sentence was fulfilled, the Prince married the true bride, and ever after they ruled over their kingdom in peace and blessedness.
Houve, uma vez, uma velha rainha que enviuvara desde muito tempo, ficando apenas com uma filha de extrema beleza.
A menina foi crescendo e se tornou uma belíssima jovem; então foi prometida em casamento ao filho do rei de um reino distante. Quando chegou a época de se realizarem as bodas, ela teve que partir para o reino do noivo. A rainha viúva deu-lhe um riquíssimo enxoval que, além de muita roupa maravilhosa, incluia também uma grande quantidade de móveis finamente cinzelados, jóias raras, cristais finíssimos e uma infinidade de objetos de ouro e prata; em suma, deu-lhe o máximo que convinha a uma princesa real, pois amava ternamente sua única filha. Para a longa viagem deu-lhe ainda uma aia, incumbida de acompanhá-la e entregá-la nas mãos do
príncipe. No momento de partir, as duas receberam um cavalo cada uma, sendo que o da princesa se chamava Falante, porque sabia falar.
Na hora das despedidas, a rainha foi ao quarto; com uma faquinha de ouro feriu-se no dedo e deixou pingar três gôtas de sangue num alvo lencinho de rendas; em seguida, entregou o lenço à filha, recomendando-lhe:
- Minha querida filha, guarda isto com o máximo cuidado; ser-te-á de grande auxílio na viagem.
Abraçaram-se e beijaram-se com grande tristeza; depois de guardar o lenço no decote do vestido, a princesa montou a cavalo e partiu. Após algumas horas de viagem, ela teve sêde e pediu à aia:
- Apeia e vai buscar, com o copo que trouxeste para mim, um pouco de água daquele regato; estou com muita sêde.
- Se tendes sêde, - respondeu a aia rispidamente - descei do cavalo e ide beber no regato, pois não me agrada ser vossa criada.
Como estivesse realmente com muita sêde, a princesa apeou, foi até ao regato e bebeu; não tendo tido a coragem de pedir o copo de ouro bebeu nas mãos, suspirando: "Ai meu Deus!"
As três gôtas de sangue do lencinho, disseram:
- Ah, se tua mãe o soubesse, o coração dela se partiría de dor!
A princesa, porém, não disse nada; voltou humildemente a montar o cavalo e a viagem continuou. Cavalgaram muitas milhas. O dia estava quente e o sol abrasador; a princesa tornou a sentir sêde e, ao chegar perto de outro regato, já esquecida da grosseria da aia, pediu- -lhe outra vez que lhe fósse buscar um copo de água.
Mas a aia respondeu com desdém:
- Quereis beber? então apeai e ide beber. De hoje em diante proíbo-vos de me considerar vossa criada.
A princesa desmontou do cavalo, debruçou-se junto do regato e bebeu pelas mãos em concha, suspirando: "Ai meu Deus!"
E as três gotas de sangue responderam:
- Ah, se tua mãe o soubesse, o coração dela se partiría de dor!
Estando ela assim debruçada sôbre o regato, o lenço caiu dentro da água e foi levado pela correnteza abaixo. Porém, como ela estivesse tão aflita e preocupada, não deu por isso. Mas a aia bem que viu e exultou; pois daí em diante a noiva estava sem seu poder. Tendo perdido aquelas preciosas gôtas de sangue, tornara-se sem forças e incapaz de qualquer autoridade. Quando a princesa fêz menção de montar o cavalo, a aia antecipou-se-lhe, dizendo com altivez:
- Não, não. Falante agora me pertence; tu ficarás com o meu sendeiro.
A pobre princesa teve de submeter-se. A aia ordenou-lhe ainda que despisse os ricos trajes reais e os substituísse pelos seus rústicos vestidos de simples criada, fazendo-a jurar, sob pena de morte, que do ocorrido não contaria nada a ninguém na côrte de seu noivo.
Falante, porém, tudo vinha observando com grande atenção.
Depois disso, a aia montou no cavalo Falante e a noiva legítima no velho sendeiro; e assim fizeram o resto da viagem.
Ao chegarem ao castelo real, foram recebidas com grandes manifestações de alegria; o noivo saiu-lhes ao encontro e ajudou a aia a descer do cavalo, certo de que fôsse a sua noiva. Acompanhada de luzido cortejo ela foi introduzida no paço, enquanto a verdadeira princesa ficava lá fora no pátio.
Mas o velho rei, pai do noivo, que estava à janela, viu a delicada e mimosa jovem parada no meio do pátio completamente esquecida. Impressionado pela sua graça e beleza, foi perguntar à falsa noiva quem era aquela criatura que trouxera consigo e deixara lá fora.
- Oh, - disse a noiva - é uma pobre môça que apanhei na estrada para me fazer companhia. E' bom dar- -lhe alguma ocupação para que não fique por aí vagabundando.
O rei não sabia que serviço lhe podia dar; finalmente, depois de pensar um pouco, teve uma idéia.
- Tenho um rapazinho que pastoreia os meus gansos; ela poder ia ajudá-lo!
Assim a pobre princesa foi pastorear gansos junto com o rapazinho, que se chamava Conrado.
Alguns dias depois a embusteira disse ao noivo:
- Meu querido noivo, desejo pedir-vos um favor todo especial.
- Sereis atendida com o maior prazer, - respondeu o príncipe.
- Desejo que mandeis cortar a cabeça do cavalo em que vim montada, pois deu-me muitos aborrecimentos pelo caminho.
Na verdade, porém, ela estava com mêdo de que o cavalo revelasse os maus tratos que dispensara à princesa. As coisas estavam num tal pé que não foi possível ao príncipe deixar de atendê-la e o bom cavalo Falante teve de morrer.
A novidade espalhou-se e, ao ter conhecimento dela, a princesinha desmaiou. Então chamou, em segrêdo, o magarefe que matara o cavalo e, cautelosamente, prometeu que lhe daria umas moedas de ouro se lhe prestasse um pequeno favor. Havia na cidade um portão com um grande arco de pedra, escuro, sob o qual ela tinha que passar, diàriamente, com os gansos. Queria que o homem pregasse a cabeça do cavalo nesse arco a fim de ela ter a consolação de ver ainda algumas vêzes o querido corcel.
Na manhã seguinte, muito cedo, a princesa e Conra- do, tocando os gansos, passaram sob o arco de pedra e ela exclamou tristemente:
- Ó Falante, que aí estás pregado!
e a cabeça respondeu:

- Ó pequena Rainha que cuidas
dos gansos de teu senhor;
se tua mãe o soubesse,
o coração dela se partiria de dor!

Ela continuou, silenciosamente, o caminho para fora das muralhas da cidade, rumo ao campo onde os gansos iam pastar. Chegando a um belo relvado, a princesa sen- tou-se e soltou a maravilhosa cabeleira de ouro. Conra-
do ficou tão deslumbrado com o brilho dos cabelos dela que desejou arrancar alguns. A princesa, então, cantarolou:

- Sopra, sopra forte, amigo vento!
Carrega para além dêste prado
o chapèuzinho de Conrado,
e não permitas que êle o alcance
antes de pronto o meu penteado!

No mesmo instante, levantou-se um forte vento que levou para longe o chapèuzinho de Conrado, obrigando o pobre rapazinho a correr-lhe atrás pelo campo afora.
Quando, finalmente, voltou com o chapèuzinho, ela já tinha penteado os cabelos e prendido sob a touca, de modo que êle não conseguiu furtar nem um fio dos cobiçados cachos.
Então Conrado ficou muito zangado e não quis mais falar com ela; assim guardaram os gansos, em silêncio, até ao cair da noite; depois regressaram ao castelo.
Na manhã seguinte, tornando a passar sob o arco de pedra, a princesa suspirou a repetiu as palavras da véspera:
- Ó Falante, que aí estás pregado!
Falante respondeu:

- Ó pequena Rainha, que cuidas
dos gansos de leu senhor;
se tua mie o soubesse,
o coração dela se partiria de dor!
No campo, ela sentou-se outra vez no relvado e pôs- se a pentear a magnífica cabeleira de ouro. O rapazinho correu para ela no intuito de roubar-lhe um cacho; mas ela, mais que depressa, repetiu o verso:

- Sopra, sopra forte amigo vento!
Carrega para além dêste prado
o chapèuzinho de Conrado.
e não permitas que êle o alcance
antes de pronto o meu penteado!

O vento soprou com fôrça e carregou para longe o chapèuzinho de Conrado, que foi obrigado a correr para apanhá-lo. Quando voltou, a princesa já estava penteada e com a touca na cabeça; assim, nem desta vez pôd' o rapazinho satisfazer o desejo de arrancar-lhe alguns fios de cabelo. Ficou muito zangado e deixou de falar com ela durante o resto do dia. Mas à noite, assim que chegaram ao castelo, Conrado foi ter com o rei, declarando:
- Não quero mais pastorear os gansos junto com essa môça.
- Por quê? - indagou o velho rei.
- Porque ela me aborrece o tempo todo!
O rei, então, exigiu que êle contasse direito o que se passava.
- Ora, tôdas as manhãs, - disse Conrado - quando passamos com os gansos sob o arco de pedra, ela fala com a cabeça de cavalo lá pendurada, dizendo:
- ó Falante, que aí estás pregado!
e a cabeça lhe responde:
- Ó pequena Rainha, que cuidas
dos gansos de teu senhor;
se tua mãe o soubesse,
o coração dela se partiria de dor!

Depois contou a história do vento que lhe arrancava o chapéu da cabeça e êle tinha que correr por todo o campo a fim de apanhá-lo.
O rei mandou que fôssem, ainda no dia seguinte, levar os gansos ao prado; e, muito cedo, foi postar-se atrás do arco e ouviu a môça que falava à cabeça do cavalo. Depois seguiu-a, ocultamente, até ao prado e se escondeu atrás de uma moita. Com os próprios olhos viu a pastorinha sentar na relva e soltar a maravilhosa cabeleira que cintilava como ouro puro. E viu o rapaz aproximar-se e ela dizer depressa:

- Sopra, sopra forte amigo vento!
Carrega para além dêste prado
o chapèuzinho de Conrado,
e não permitas que êle o alcance
antes de pronto o meu penteado!

Mal a pastorinha acabou de dizer o verso uma forte lufada de vento carregou para longe o chapéu de Conrado, que saiu a correr para apanhá-lo. Enquanto isso, a môça penteou tranqüilamente os formosos cachos de ouro; e o rei tudo observava com grande atenção.
Sem que fôsse notado, o rei voltou para o castelo e, à noite, quando a pastorinha regressou, chamou-a para um canto e perguntou-lhe o que significava tudo aquilo.
- Não posso contar, Majestade, nem posso revelar a ninguém a minha mágoa; jurei à luz do sol nunca dizer nada a ninguém; se quebrar meu juramento, perderei a vida.
O rei insistiu com firmeza, mas não conseguiu arrancar-lhe mais uma só palavra. Então lhe disse:
- Pois bem, já que não queres contar a mim o teu segrêdo, confia-o ao fogo da lareira.
Dito isto, virou-lhe as costas e foi-se embora.
Ficando sozinha, a môça debruçou-se sôbre o fogo chorando e lamentando-se amargamente; desabafou sua grande mágoa, dizendo:
- Eis-me aqui só e abandonada de todos! No entanto, sou uma princesa. Ao passo que uma perversa aia, que me forçou a trocar meus vestidos reais pelos dela, está usurpando meu lugar junto ao príncipe, meu noivo. E eu sou obrigada a pastorear gansos no prado e fazer os trabalhos mais grosseiros. Oh, se minha mãe o soubesse, o coração dela se partiría de dor!
O rei, que fingira afastar-se, estava postado atrás da lareira e ouviu tôda a confissão da pobre môça. Voltou para o salão e mandou a pastorinha sair de junto a lareira. Depois deu ordens às camareiras para que a vestissem e ataviassem como convinha a uma verdadeira princesa. Ela ficou tão linda que parecia um sonho.
Chamando o filho, o rei pô-lo ao par de tudo, revelando que ficara com a falsa noiva, uma simples aia. enquanto a verdadeira noiva ia pastorear gansos no prado.
O príncipe ficou deslumbrdo ante a beleza e encanto da môça; mandou logo preparar um suntuoso banquete para festejar o encontro e convidar todos os amigos e parentes. O noivo sentou-se à cabeceira da mesa, tendo a princesa de um lado e a aia do outro; esta última estava tão deslumbrada com a magnificência da princesa que não a reconheceu naqueles trajes fulgurantes.
Quando terminaram de comer e beber e os convivas estavam no auge da animação, o velho rei contou à aia, com grande habilidade, uma história bem semelhante à dela e perguntou:
- Que castigo achas que merece uma pessoa que assim trai o seu amo?
A falsa noiva, sem desconfiar de nada, respondeu:
- Acho que uma pessoa assim deveria ser desnudada e colocada dentro de um barril todo forrado de pontas de pregos, ao qual deveríam atrelar dois fogosos cavalos que o arrastassem pelas ruas da cidade até ela morrer.
- Essa criada perversa és tu, - disse o rei - e acabas de proferir a tua própria condenação; assim será feito.
A sentença foi logo cumprida. Depois, o príncipe casou com a verdadeira princesa e ambos reinaram durante longos anos na mais completa felicidade.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.