ENGLISH

The goose girl

РУССКИЙ

Гусятница


There lived once an old Queen, whose husband had been dead many years. She had a beautiful daughter who was promised in marriage to a King's son living a great way off. When the time appointed for the wedding drew near, and the old Queen had to send her daughter into the foreign land, she got together many costly things, furniture and cups and jewels and adornments, both of gold and silver, everything proper for the dowry of a royal Princess, for she loved her daughter dearly. She gave her also a waiting gentlewoman to attend her and to give her into the bridegroom's hands; and they were each to have a horse for the journey, and the Princess's horse was named Falada, and he could speak. When the time for parting came, the old Queen took her daughter to her chamber, and with a little knife she cut her own finger so that it bled; and she held beneath it a white napkin, and on it fell three drops of blood; and she gave it to her daughter, bidding her take care of it, for it would be needful to her on the way.

Then they took leave of each other; and the Princess put the napkin in her bosom, got on her horse, and set out to go to the bridegroom. After she had ridden an hour, she began to feel very thirsty, and she said to the waiting-woman, "Get down, and fill my cup that you are carrying with water from the brook; I have great desire to drink." - "Get down yourself," said the waiting-woman, "and if you are thirsty stoop down and drink; I will not be your slave." And as her thirst was so great, the Princess had to get down and to stoop and drink of the water of the brook, and could not have her gold cup to serve her. "Oh dear!" said the poor Princess. And the three drops of blood heard her, and said, "If your mother knew of this, it would break her heart." But the Princess answered nothing, and quietly mounted her horse again. So they rode on some miles farther; the day was warm, the sun shone hot, and the Princess grew thirsty once more. And when they came to a water-course she called again to the waiting-woman and said, "Get down, and give me to drink out of my golden cup." For she had forgotten all that had gone before. But the waiting-woman spoke still more scornfully and said, "If you want a drink, you may get it yourself; I am not going to be your slave." So, as her thirst was so great, the Princess had to get off her horse and to stoop towards the running water to drink, and as she stooped, she wept and said, "Oh dear!" And the three drops of blood heard her and answered, "If your mother knew of this, it would break her heart!" And as she drank and stooped over, the napkin on which were the three drops of blood fell out of her bosom and floated down the stream, and in her distress she never noticed it; not so the waiting-woman, who rejoiced because she should have power over the bride, who, now that she had lost the three drops of blood, had become weak, and unable to defend herself. And when she was going to mount her horse again the waiting-woman cried, "Falada belongs to me, and this jade to you." And the Princess had to give way and let it be as she said. Then the waiting-woman ordered the Princess with many hard words to take off her rich clothing and to put on her plain garments, and then she made her swear to say nothing of the matter when they came to the royal court; threatening to take her life if she refused. And all the while Falada noticed and remembered.

The waiting-woman then mounting Falada, and the Princess the sorry jade, they journeyed on till they reached the royal castle. There was great joy at their coming, and the King's son hastened to meet them, and lifted the waiting woman from her horse, thinking she was his bride; and then he led her up the stairs, while the real Princess had to remain below. But the old King, who was looking out of the window, saw her standing in the yard, and noticed how delicate and gentle and beautiful she was, and then he went down and asked the seeming bride who it was that she had brought with her and that was now standing in the courtyard.

"Oh!" answered the bride, "I only brought her with me for company; give the maid something to do, that she may not be for ever standing idle." But the old King had no work to give her; until he bethought him of a boy he had who took care of the geese, and that she might help him. And so the real Princess was sent to keep geese with the goose-boy, who was called Conrad.

Soon after the false bride said to the Prince, "Dearest husband, I pray thee do me a pleasure." - "With all my heart," answered he. "Then "said she, "send for the knacker, that he may carry off the horse I came here upon, and make away with him; he was very troublesome to me on the journey." For she was afraid that the horse might tell how she had behaved to the Princess. And when the order had been given that Falada should die, it came to the Princess's ears, and she came to the knacker's man secretly, and promised him a piece of gold if he would do her a service. There was in the town a great dark gate-way through which she had to pass morning and evening with her geese, and she asked the man to take Falada's head and to nail it on the gate, that she might always see it as she passed by. And the man promised, and he took Falada's head and nailed it fast in the dark gate-way.

Early next morning as she and Conrad drove their geese through the gate, she said as she went by:

"O Falada, dost thou hang there?"

And the head answered:

"Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain."

But she went on through the town, driving her geese to the field. And when they came into the meadows, she sat down and undid her hair, which was all of gold, and when Conrad saw how it glistened, he wanted to pull out a few hairs for himself. And she said:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
Make him run after as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And twist it up
in seemly wise."

Then there came a wind strong enough to blow Conrad's hat far away over the fields, and he had to run after it; and by the time he came back she had put up her hair with combs and pins, and he could not get at any to pull it out; and he was sulky and would not speak to her; so they looked after the geese until the evening came, and then they went home.

The next morning, as they passed under the dark gate-way, the Princess said:

"O Falada, dost thou hang there?"

And Falada answered:

"Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain."

And when they reached the fields she sat down and began to comb out her hair; then Conrad came up and wanted to seize upon some of it, and she cried:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
Make him run after as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And do it up
in seemly wise."

Then the wind came and blew Conrad's hat very far away, so that he had to run after it, and when he came back again her hair was put up again, so that he could pull none of it out; and they tended the geese until the evening.

And after they had got home, Conrad went to the old King and said: "I will tend the geese no longer with that girl!" - "Why not?" asked the old King. "Because she vexes me the whole day long," answered Conrad. Then the old King ordered him to tell how it was. "Every morning," said Conrad, "as we pass under the dark gate-way with the geese, there is an old horse's head hanging on the wall, and she says to it:

'O Falada, dost thou hang there?'

And the head answers:

'Princess, dost thou so meanly fare?
But if thy mother knew thy pain,
Her heart would surely break in twain.'"

And besides this, Conrad related all that happened in the fields, and how he was obliged to run after his hat.

The old King told him to go to drive the geese next morning as usual, and he himself went behind the gate and listened how the maiden spoke to Falada; and then he followed them into the fields, and hid himself behind a bush; and he watched the goose-boy and the goose-girl tend the geese; and after a while he saw the girl make her hair all loose, and how it gleamed and shone. Soon she said:

"O wind, blow Conrad's hat away,
And make him follow as it flies,
While I with my gold hair will play,
And bind it up
in seemly wise."

Then there came a gust of wind and away went Conrad's hat, and he after it, while the maiden combed and bound up her hair; and the old King saw all that went on. At last he went unnoticed away, and when the goose-girl came back in the evening he sent for her, and asked the reason of her doing all this. "That I dare not tell you," she answered, "nor can I tell any man of my woe, for when I was in danger of my life I swore an oath not to reveal it." And he pressed her sore, and left her no peace, but he could get nothing out of her. At last he said, "If you will not tell it me, tell it to the iron oven," and went away. Then she crept into the iron oven, and began to weep and to lament, and at last she opened her heart and said, "Here I sit forsaken of all the world, and I am a King's daughter, and a wicked waiting-woman forced me to give up my royal garments and my place at the bridegroom's side, and I am made a goose-girl, and have to do mean service. And if my mother knew, it would break her heart." Now the old King was standing outside by the oven-door listening, and he heard all she said, and he called to her and told her to come out of the oven. And he caused royal clothing to be put upon her, and it was a marvel to see how beautiful she was. The old King then called his son and proved to him that he had the wrong bride, for she was really only a waiting-woman, and that the true bride was here at hand, she who had been the goose-girl. The Prince was glad at heart when he saw her beauty and gentleness; and a great feast was made ready, and all the court people and good friends were bidden to it. The bridegroom sat in the midst with the Princess on one side and the waiting-woman on the other; and the false bride did not know the true one, because she was dazzled with her glittering braveries. When all the company had eaten and drunk and were merry, the old King gave the waiting-woman a question to answer, as to what such an one deserved, who had deceived her masters in such and such a manner, telling the whole story, and ending by asking, "Now, what doom does such an one deserve?" - "No better than this," answered the false bride, "that she be put naked into a cask, studded inside with sharp nails, and be dragged along in it by two white horses from street to street, until she be dead." - "Thou hast spoken thy own doom," said the old King, "as thou hast said, so shall it be done." And when the sentence was fulfilled, the Prince married the true bride, and ever after they ruled over their kingdom in peace and blessedness.
Давно уж это было: жила-была на свете старая королева, у которой муж уже умер и осталась одна дочка-красавица. Когда та выросла, то была помолвлена с одним королевичем на чужбине.

Настало время вступать им в супружество; королевна должна была отправиться в иноземное государство, и ее мать-королева дала ей в приданое очень много ценной утвари и украшений, серебра и золота, кубков и всякой казны - одним словом, все, что принадлежало к ее приданому, потому что она очень любила свою дочку.

Кроме всего этого старая королева отдала своей дочери и такую служанку в провожатые, которая должна была с нею вместе ехать и передать ее в руки жениха; каждой из них - и невесте, и камеристке - королева дала по коню.

Конь королевны звался Фалада и умел говорить.

Когда настал час разлуки, мать-королева пошла в свою опочивальню, взяла ножичек и порезала им пальцы, так что кровь из них закапала; на пальцы она наложила тряпочку, накапала на нее три капли крови, отдала дочке и сказала: "Милое дитятко, прибереги эти капли моей крови; они тебе в дороге пригодятся."

Так и распрощались они со слезами; тряпочку королевна спрятала к себе за пазуху, села на коня и пустилась в путь к своему жениху.

После часового переезда королевне очень захотелось пить, и она сказала своей камеристке: "Сойди с коня и зачерпни мне воды из ручья в тот кубок, который ты для меня захватила, мне очень пить хочется." - "Коли вам пить хочется, - отвечала камеристка, - так вы можете сами сойти с коня, приклониться к воде и пить, а я вам служанкой не намерена быть."

Королевну так мучила жажда, что она сошла с коня, приклонилась к воде ручья и стала пить, и не смела золотым кубком воды зачерпнуть.

Невольно вырвалось у нее восклицание: "Ах, Боже мой!" - а три капельки крови отвечали ей: "Кабы знала это твоя матушка, у ней сердце в груди разорвалось бы!"

Но королевна только запечалилась, не сказала ни слова и снова села на коня.

Так проехали они еще много верст; а день был жаркий, солнце палило, и вскоре жажда стала снова мучить королевну. Проезжая мимо реки, она еще раз позвала камеристку и сказала: "Сойди с коня и дай мне напиться из моего золотого кубка." Она уж на нее сердиться и не думала.

Но камеристка отвечала ей еще горделивее: "Коли хотите пить, ступайте и пейте, а я вашей служанкой быть не намерена."

Тогда сошла королевна с коня от великой жажды, приникла к текучей воде, заплакала и сказала: "Ах, Боже мой!" - а три капельки крови ей опять отвечали: "Кабы знала твоя матушка, у ней сердце в груди разорвалось бы!"

И между тем, как она жадно пила и к воде наклонялась, выпала у нее из-за пазухи в воду тряпочка с тремя капельками крови и понесло ее водою по течению, и она того в волнении своем не приметила…

А камеристка-то это видела и радовалась тому, что она теперь получила власть над королевной: лишившись трех капелек материнской крови, та становилась совсем слабою и беспомощною.

Когда она, вернувшись от реки, хотела опять сесть на своего коня, который звался Фалада, камеристка сказала ей: "На Фаладе следует мне ехать, а тебе на моей кляче," - и королевна должна была на это согласиться.

Затем камеристка приказала ей очень грубо, чтобы она сняла с себя королевское платье и надела ее, простое, и сверх того под открытым небом должна была поклясться, что она никому при королевском дворе ни слова не скажет о том, что они платьями обменялись; а если бы она не дала этой клятвы, то камеристка грозилась ее на месте убить. Но Фалада все это видел и все примечал.

И вот камеристка села верхом на Фаладу, а настоящая невеста на ее плохого коня, и так поехали они далее, до самых ворот королевского замка.

Там очень обрадовались их прибытию, королевич выбежал им навстречу, помог камеристке слезть с коня и вообразил себе, что она-то и предназначена ему в супруги.

Он повел ее вверх по лестнице в замок, а настоящая-то королевна должна была внизу дожидаться. Старый король тем временем смотрел из окошка во двор и заметил, какая она была тонкая, нежная и красивая; тотчас пошел он к невесте и спросил ее, что за особа с ней приехала и там во дворе осталась и кто она такова. "Я ее с собой на дороге прихватила, чтобы не одной мне ехать; дайте ей какую-нибудь работу, чтобы она не оставалась без дела."

Но у старого короля не было для нее работы, и он сказал только: "Есть у меня маленький мальчишечка, что гусей пасет, вот пусть тому помогает."

Мальчика того звали Кюрдхен, ему-то и должна была настоящая невеста помочь гусей пасти.

Вскоре после того ложная невеста стала говорить, молодому королю: "Милый мой супруг, прошу вас сделать мне маленькое одолжение." - "С удовольствием," - отвечал он. "Так вот, прикажите позвать живодера и отрубить голову тому коню, на котором я сюда ехала, потому что он мне очень досадил по пути сюда."

Так говорила она нарочно, а собственно-то говоря, опасалась того, что эта лошадь могла бы рассказать, как она обращалась в дороге с королевной.

Дошел и до настоящей королевны слух о том, что верный Фалада должен умереть, и вот она тайно обещала живодеру дать червонец, если тот ей окажет маленькую услугу.

В королевском городе были большие мрачные ворота, через которые она ввечеру и поутру должна была прогонять гусей. Вот под этими воротами она и просила живодера прибить голову Фалады ей на память. Так и пообещал ей живодеров помощник, отрубил верному коню голову и прибил гвоздем под мрачными воротами.

Рано утром, когда она с Кюрдхеном прогоняла гусей под воротами, она сказала мимоходом:



Висишь ты здесь, мой верный Фалада!

- а голова ей отвечала:



А тебе, королевна, гусей гнать надо…
Если б твоя матушка про то дозналась,
Сердце бы ее тогда разорвалось!

Так и прошли они далее за город, и пригнали гусей на пастбище. Придя на лужок, присела она на травку, распустила свою косу, а коса у ней блестела как золото, и Кюрдхен это увидел, и очень ему понравился блеск ее волос, и он захотел парочку их у королевны из косы вырвать.

Тогда она проговорила:



Дуй, подуй-ка, ветерок,
Сдуй с Кюрдхена колпачок;
Вдаль гони его, прошу,
Пока косу расчешу!

И налетел вдруг такой сильный ветер, что сдул с Кюрдхена его колпачок, погнал его вдаль, и мальчик вынужден был за тем колпачком бежать.

Пока он вернулся, королевна расчесала и прибрала свои волосы, и мальчику не досталось ни одного ее волоска. Тогда мальчик рассердился на нее и не стал с нею говорить; и так пасли они гусей до самого вечера, а затем отправились домой.

На другое утро, проходя под мрачными воротами, королевна сказала:



Висишь ты здесь, мой верный Фалада!

- а Фалада отвечал ей:



А тебе, королевна, гусей гнать надо…
Если б твоя матушка про то дозналась,
Сердце бы ее тогда разорвалось!

А придя на пастбище, села она опять на лужок и опять стала расчесывать свои волосы, и Кюрдхен стал опять за нею бегать и хотел ее ухватить за волосы; но она проговорила:



Дуй, подуй-ка, ветерок,
Сдуй с Кюрдхена колпачок;
Вдаль гони его, прошу,
Пока косу расчешу!

И налетел ветер, и сорвал с головы у мальчика его колпачок, и пришлось ему долго за ним бегать, а когда он вернулся, она уж давно прибрала свои волосы, и он ни одного волоска от нее добыть не мог; и опять они пасли своих гусей до вечера.

Под вечер, однако же, когда они гусей пригнали, Кюрдхен пошел к старому королю и сказал: "С этой девушкой я не хочу больше гусей пасти." - "А почему бы так?" - спросил король. "Да она мне целый день досаждает."

Старый король стал расспрашивать его, чем она ему досаждает. На это Кюрдхен сказал: "Утром, когда мы с гусями проходим под мрачными воротами, а там лошадиная голова на стене повешена, она той голове говорит:



Висишь ты здесь, мой верный Фалада!

- а голова ей отвечает:



А тебе, королевна, гусей гнать надо…
Если б твоя матушка про то дозналась,
Сердце бы ее тогда разорвалось!"

А затем он рассказал королю, что каждое утро происходит на гусином пастбище и как он должен по ветру гоняться за своей шляпенкой.

Старый король приказал ему на следующий день опять гнать гусей с королевной, а сам спозаранок засел позади мрачных ворот и слышал своими ушами, как она говорила с головой своего Фалады; затем пошел он за нею следом на пастбище и спрятался за куст на лужайке.

Тут вскоре он своими собственными глазами увидел, как Кюрдхен и гусятница пригнали стадо гусей и как она потом села и распустила свои волосы, блестевшие как золото. Вслед за тем она опять-таки сказала:



Дуй, подуй-ка, ветерок,
Сдуй с Кюрдхена колпачок;
Вдаль гони его, прошу,
Пока косу расчешу!

И опять налетел порыв ветра и унесся с колпачком Кюрдхена вдаль, так что тот должен был за ним долго бегать, а гусятница тем временем преспокойно расчесывала и плела свои косы, и старый король все это наблюдал из своей засады.

Никем не замеченный, вернулся он домой, и когда вечером гусятница пригнала гусей с пастбища, он отозвал ее в сторону и спросил, почему она все это делает.

"Этого не смею я вам сказать, - отвечала гусятница, - не смею я никому на свое горе пожаловаться, потому что я поклялась об этом молчать, не то придется мне жизнь потерять."

Но король настаивал и продолжал допрашивать, и все же ничего от нее не мог добиться. "Ну, - сказал он, - если уж ты мне ничего сказать не хочешь, так вот поделись своим горем с этою железною печкой," - да на том и ушел.

Тогда влезла королевна в железную печь, стала плакать и жаловаться, облегчила свое наболевшее сердце и сказала: "Вот сижу я здесь, бедная, всеми покинутая! Хотя я королевна по рождению, а коварная камеристка силой заставила меня скинуть мое королевское платье и заняла мое место у жениха, между тем как я стала гусятницей и теперь вынуждена справлять всякую черную работу. Кабы знала то моя матушка, у ней сердце с горя разорвалось бы!"

А старый-то король тем временем стоял наверху у самого устья трубы, прислушивался и слышал все, что она говорила.

Выслушав ее, он вернулся опять в ту же комнату и велел ей выйти из печки.

Он приказал одеть ее в королевское платье - и надивиться не мог ее красоте.

Затем позвал король своего сына и открыл ему, что приехала к нему не его невеста, а ее камеристка, и что девушка-гусятница есть его настоящая невеста.

Молодой король был радешенек, увидев, какая у него невеста красавица и умница, и по поводу этого открытия затеял большой пир, на который пригласил всех своих друзей и близких.

На первом месте за столом сидел жених, и королевна сидела по одну его руку, а камеристка - по другую и настолько была ослеплена, что не могла узнать королевну в ее блестящем наряде.

Когда все попили и поели, и повеселели, старый король задал камеристке загадку: "Чего бы достойна была служанка, которая так-то и так-то обманула свою госпожу?" - и затем, изложив перед всеми историю королевны, потребовал, чтобы камеристка сказала, какой приговор следует произнести над такой обманщицей.

Выслушав короля, камеристка сказала: "Такая обманщица достойна была бы того, чтобы раздеть ее донага, посадить в бочку, убитую гвоздями; а в ту бочку впрячь двух белых коней и на тех конях катить ее по улицам в бочке до самого места казни."

Король же сказал: "Эта обманщица - ты сама, и произнесла ты свой собственный приговор: над тобой его и исполним."

И когда этот приговор был исполнен, молодой король женился на настоящей королевне, и правили они своим королевством долго и мирно.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.