ENGLISH

Old Hildebrand

DEUTSCH

Der alte Hildebrand


Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her. The peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, "Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I'll tell you what; on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing so until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately."
"I will manage it," said the woman promptly. Now therefore on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did everything for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, "I feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end I should like to hear the parson's sermon that he is going to preach to-day." On that the peasant said, "Ah, my child, do not do it -- thou mightest make thyself worse if thou wert to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell thee everything the parson says."

"Well," said the woman, "go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that thou hearest." So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and would make a pilgimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly, and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, "Hurrah! dear wife, it is now almost the same thing as if thou wert well! The parson has preached to-day that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whoever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that thou mayst get well the faster," and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the woman got up, and the parson was there directly.

But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peasant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill, and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. "May you be blessed," said the gossip, "where are you off to so fast?"

"To all eternity, my friend," said the peasant, "my wife is ill, and I have been to-day to hear the parson's sermon, and he preached that if any one had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage." - "But listen, gossip," said the egg-merchant to the peasant, "are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don't you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way."

"My word!" said the peasant. "How I'd like to know if that's true!"

"Come, then," said the gossip, "I'll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself." So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket and carried him home.

When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merry there! The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes, and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and woman asked who was there. "It is I, gossip," said the egg-merchant, "give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already."

"Indeed, my friend," said the woman, "thou comest at a very inconvenient time for me, but as thou art here it can't be helped, come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove." Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parso, however, and the woman, were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, "Listen, my dear friend, thou canst sing beautifully; sing something to me." - "Oh," said the woman, "I cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that's all over now."

"Come," said the parson once more, "do sing some little song."

On that the woman began and sang,

"I've sent my husband away from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy."
Thereupon the parson sang,
"I wish 'twas a year before he came back,
I'd never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack."
Hallelujah.
Then the gossip who was in the background began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,
"What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear,
There on the bench by the stove so near?"

Hallelujah.
And then the peasant sang from his basket,
"All singing I ever shall hate from this day,
And here in this basket no longer I'll stay."
Hallelujah.
And he got out of the basket, and cudgelled the parson out of the house.
Es war amahl a Baur und a Bäurin, und dö Bäurin, dö hat der Pfarra im Dorf gern gesegn, und da hat er alleweil gwunschen, wann er nur amahl an ganzen Tag mit der Bäurin allan recht vergnügt zubringa kunnt, und der Bäurin, der wars halt a recht gwesn. No, da hat er amahl zu der Bäurin gsagt 'hanz, mei liebi Bäurin, hietzt hab i was ausstudiert, wie wir halt amahl an ganzen Tag recht vergnügt mitanander zubringa kunnten. Wißts was, ös legts eng aufm Mittwoch ins Bett und sagts engern Mon, ös seits krang, und lamatierts und übelts nur recht, und das treibts fort bis aufm Sunta, wann i die Predi halt, und da wir (werde) i predigen, daß wer z' Haus a krangs Kind, an krangen Mon, a krangs Weib, an krangen Vader, a krange Muader, a krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha is, hat, und der tut a Wollfart aufm Göcherliberg in Wälischland, wo ma um an Kreuzer an Metzen Lorberbladen kriegt, dem wirds krange Kind, der krange Mon, 's krange Weib, der krange Vader, d' krange Muader, d' krange Schwester, oda wers sunst nacha is, auf der Stell gsund.'

'Dös wir i schon machen,' hat die Bäurm drauf gsagt. No, drauf, aufm Mittwoch hat sie halt d' Bäurin ins Bett glegt und hat g,lamatiert und g'übelt als wie, und ihr Mon hat ihr alles braucht, was er nur gwißt hat, 's hat aber halt nix gholfn. Wie denn der Sunta kuma is, hat d' Bäurin gsagt 'mir is zwar so miserabel, als ob i glei verschaden sollt, aber ans möcht i do no vor mei End, i möcht halt in Herrn Pfarra sei Predi hörn, dö er heund halten wird.' 'A, mei Kind,' sagt der Baur drauf, 'tu du dös nit, du kunntst schlechter wern, wann aufstundst. Schau, es wir i in d' Predi gehn und wir recht acht gebe und wir dir alles wieder derzöhln, was der Herr Pfarra gsagt hat.' 'No,' hat d' Bäurin gsagt, 'so geh halt und gibt recht acht und derzöhl mir alles, was d' gehört hast.' No, und da is der Baur halt in d' Predi ganga, und da hat der Herr Pfarra also angfangt zun predigen und hat halt gsagt, wann ans a krangs Kind, an krangen Mon, a krangs Weib, an krangen Vader, a krange Muader, a krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, z' Haus hät, und der wollt a Wollfart machen aufm Göckerliberg in Wälischland, wo der Metzen Lorberbladen an Kreuzer kost, dem wird 's krange Kind, der krange Mon, 's krange Weib, der krange Vater, d' krange Muader, d' krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, auf der Stell gsund wern, und wer also dö Ras unternehma wollt, der soll nach der MeB zu ihm kuma, da wird er ihm den Lorbersack gebn und den Kreuzer. Da war niembd fröher als der Bauer, und nach der Meß is er gleich zum Pfarra ganga, und der hat ihm also den Lorbersack gebn und den Kreuzer. Drauf is er nach Haus kuma und hat schon bei der Haustür eini gschrien 'juchesha, liebes Weib, hietzt is so viel, als obs gsund warst. Der Herr Pfarra hat heunt predigt, daß, wer a krangs Kind, an krangen Mon, a kranges Weib, an krangen Vader, a krange Muader, a krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, z' Haus hat, und der macht a Wollfart aufm Göckerliberg in Wälischland, wo der Metzen Lorberbladen an Kreuzer kost, dem wird 's krange Kind, der krange Mon, 's krange Weib, der krange Vader, d' krange Muader, d' krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, auf der Stell gsund; und hietzt hab i mir schon den Lorbersack gholt vom Herrn Pfarra und den Kreuzer, und wir glei mein Wanderschaft antreten, daß d' desto ehender gsund wirst;, und drauf is er fort ganga. Er war aber kam fort, so is die Bäurin schon auf gwesn, und der Pfarra war a glei do. Hietzt lassen wir aber dö zwa indessen auf der Seiten und gänga mir mit,n Baur. Der is halt alleweil drauf los ganga, damit er desto ehender aufm Göckerliberg kummt, und wie halt so geht, begegnt ihm sein Gvatter. Sein Gvatter, dös war an Armon (Eiermann), und der is just von Mark kuma, wo er seine Ar verkauft hat. 'Globt seist,' sagt sein Gvatter, 'wo gehst denn so trabi hin, Gvatter?' 'In Ewigkeit, Gvatter,' sagt der Baur, 'mein Weib is krang worn, und da hab i heund in Herrn Pfarra sein Predi ghört, und da hat er predigt, daß, wann aner z' Haus an krangs Kind, an krangen Mon, a krangs Weib, an krangen Vader, a krange Muader, a krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, hat, und er macht a Wollfart aufm Göckerliberg in Wälischland, wo der Metzen Lorberbladen an Kreuzer kost, dem wird's krange Kind, der krange Mon, 's krange Weib, der krange Vader, d' krange Muader, d' krange Schwester, Bruader, oda wers sunst nacha war, auf der Stell gsund, und da hab i mir von Herrn Pfarra den Lorbersack und den Kreuzer gholt, und hietzt trit i halt mein Wanderschaft an.' 'Aber hanz, Gvatter,' hat der Gvatter zum Baur gsagt, 'seits denn gar so dacket (einfältig), daß so was glauben könts? Wißts, was is? der Pfarra möcht gern mit engern Weib an ganzen Tag allan recht vergnügt zubringa, drum habn's eng den Bärn anbunden, daß ihr,en aus,n Füßen kumts.' 'Mein ,' hat der Baur gsagt, 'so möcht i do wissen, ob das wahr is.' 'No,' hat der Gvatter gsagt, 'wast was, setz di in mein Arkorb eini, so will i di nach Haus tragn, und da wirst es selber segn.' No, das is also geschegn, und den Baur hat sein Gvatter in sein Arkorb eini gsetzt, und der hat,n nach Haus tragn. Wie's nach Haus kuma san, holla, da is schon lusti zuganga. Da hat die Bäurin schon fast alles, was nur in ihren Hof war, abgstochen ghabt, und Krapfen hats bachen, und der Pfarra war a schon da und hat a sein Geige mitbracht ghabt. Und da hat halt der Gvatter anklopft, und d' Bäurin hat gfragt, wer draußen war. 'I bins, Gvatterin,' hat der Gvatter gsagt, 'mei, gebts mir heund nacht a Herberg, i hab meini Ar aufm Mark nit verkauft, und hietzt muß i's wieder nach Haus trage, und sö san gar z' schwar, i bring's nit fort, es is a schon finster.' 'Ja, mein Gvatter,' sagt d' Bäurin drauf, 'ös kumts mir recht zur unglegna Zeit. No, weils halt her nit anders is, so kömts eina und setzts eng dort auf d' Ofenbank.' No hat sie der Gvatter also mit sein Buckelkorb auf d' Ofenbank gsetzt. Der Pfarra aber und d' Bäurin, dö warn halt recht lusti. Endli fangt der Pfarra an und sagt 'hanz, mein liebi Bäurin, ös könnts ja so schön singa, singts mir do ans.' 'A,' sagt die Bäurin, 'hietzt kann i nix mehr singa, ja, in mein junge Jahren, da hab i's wohl könna, aber hietzt is schon vorbei.' 'Ei,' sagt wie der der Pfarra, 'singts do nur a bißl.' No, da fangt die Bäurin an und singt

'i hab mein Mon wohl ausgesandt

aufm Göckerliberg in Wälischland'

Drauf singt der Pfarra

'i wollt, er blieb da a ganzes Jahr,

was fragt i nach dem Lorbersack.

Halleluja!'

Hietzt fangt der Gvatter hinten an und singt (da muß i aber derzöhln, daß der Baur Hildebrand ghassen hat), singt also der Gvatter

'ei du, mein lieber Hildebrand,

was machst du auf der Ofenbank?

Halleluja!'

Und hietzt singt der Baur in Korb drinna

'hietzt kann i das Singa nimmermehr leiden,

hietzt muß i aus mein Buckelkorb steigen.'

Und steigt aus'n Korb und prügelt den Pfaffen beim Haus hinaus.




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