ENGLISH

Old Hildebrand

РУССКИЙ

Старый Гильдебранд


Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her. The peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, "Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I'll tell you what; on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing so until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately."
"I will manage it," said the woman promptly. Now therefore on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did everything for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, "I feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end I should like to hear the parson's sermon that he is going to preach to-day." On that the peasant said, "Ah, my child, do not do it -- thou mightest make thyself worse if thou wert to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell thee everything the parson says."

"Well," said the woman, "go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that thou hearest." So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and would make a pilgimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly, and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, "Hurrah! dear wife, it is now almost the same thing as if thou wert well! The parson has preached to-day that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whoever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that thou mayst get well the faster," and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the woman got up, and the parson was there directly.

But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peasant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill, and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. "May you be blessed," said the gossip, "where are you off to so fast?"

"To all eternity, my friend," said the peasant, "my wife is ill, and I have been to-day to hear the parson's sermon, and he preached that if any one had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage." - "But listen, gossip," said the egg-merchant to the peasant, "are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don't you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way."

"My word!" said the peasant. "How I'd like to know if that's true!"

"Come, then," said the gossip, "I'll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself." So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket and carried him home.

When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merry there! The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes, and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and woman asked who was there. "It is I, gossip," said the egg-merchant, "give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already."

"Indeed, my friend," said the woman, "thou comest at a very inconvenient time for me, but as thou art here it can't be helped, come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove." Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parso, however, and the woman, were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, "Listen, my dear friend, thou canst sing beautifully; sing something to me." - "Oh," said the woman, "I cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that's all over now."

"Come," said the parson once more, "do sing some little song."

On that the woman began and sang,

"I've sent my husband away from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy."
Thereupon the parson sang,
"I wish 'twas a year before he came back,
I'd never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack."
Hallelujah.
Then the gossip who was in the background began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,
"What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear,
There on the bench by the stove so near?"

Hallelujah.
And then the peasant sang from his basket,
"All singing I ever shall hate from this day,
And here in this basket no longer I'll stay."
Hallelujah.
And he got out of the basket, and cudgelled the parson out of the house.
Жили-были когда-то крестьянин с крестьянкой, и приглянулась крестьянка сельскому попу; очень ему хотелось провести с той крестьянкой весь день в свое удовольствие, той этого тоже хотелось.

Ну, вот и говорит он раз крестьянке:

- Послушай, милая моя крестьянка, я теперь кое-что надумал, как нам с тобой вместе весь день провести в полном удовольствии. Знаешь что, ложись-ка ты в постель в ночь под среду да скажи своему муженьку, будто ты заболела, да только жалуйся и стони покрепче и делай этак до самого воскресенья, когда я проповедь читаю. А я скажу в своей проповеди, что ежели у кого в доме есть больной ребенок, или больной муж, или больная жена, или отец болен, мать больна, или сестра, брат или кто другой из семьи, пускай тот отправится на богомолье на гору Геккерли в Вёлишланд, где можно за один крейцер купить целую осьмину лаврового листа, и тотчас у того выздоровеет больной ребенок, больной муж и жена больная, больной отец, больная мать, больная сестра или кто другой из семьи.

- Я так и сделаю, - сказала на это крестьянка.

Ну, после того под среду улеглась она в постель и стала на болезнь жаловаться, как никогда еще не жаловалась, и муж делал с ней все, что только знал, но ничто не помогало. Вот наступило воскресенье, а крестьянка и говорит:

- Мне так неможется, словно смерть моя подходит, и одного б мне хотелось перед своей кончиной - это послушать проповедь нашего господина пастора, которую он будет нынче читать.

- Ох, дитя мое, - сказал на это крестьянин, - не делай ты этого, а то может сделаться тебе еще хуже, ежели ты подымешься. Знаешь что, пойду-ка я на проповедь сам, внимательно ее выслушаю и все тебе перескажу, что скажет господин пастор.

- Ну, - сказала крестьянка, - ступай уж ты, но слушай внимательно и расскажешь мне все, что слышал.

Вот пошел крестьянин на проповедь; начал господин пастор читать проповедь и говорят:

- И ежели у кого имеется в доме больной ребенок или больной муж, больная жена или отец болен, мать больна или сестра, брат или кто другой из семьи, то пусть отправится тот на богомолье на гору Геккерли в Вёлишланд, где можно за один крейцер купить целую осьмину лаврового листа, - и тотчас выздоровеет у того больной ребенок, больной муж, больная жена, больной отец, больная мать, больная сестра, брат или кто другой из семьи; и кто пожелает предпринять такое странствие, должен после окончания мессы прийти ко мне, и я дам тому мешок для лаврового листа и крейцер.

Никто так не обрадовался, услышав это, как крестьянин. После окончания мессы направился он тотчас к попу, и тот дал ему мешок для лаврового листа и крейцер. Вернулся крестьянин домой и только вошел в двери, да как закричит:

- Хе-хе, милая женушка, теперь уж считай, что ты выздоровела! Господин пастор сказал нынче в проповеди, что ежели у кого в доме имеется больной ребенок или больной муж, больная жена, отец болен или больна мать, больна сестра, брат или кто другой из семьи и ежели тот отправится на богомолье на гору Геккерли в Вёлишланд, где целая осьмина лаврового листа стоит один крейцер, то выздоровеет у того больной ребенок, больной муж, больная жена, больной отец, больная мать, больная сестра, брат или кто другой из семьи. Я уж получил от господина пастора и мешок для лаврового листа и крейцер и сейчас же отправляюсь в дорогу, чтоб ты поскорей выздоровела.

И он ушел из дому. Но только он ушел, поднялась тотчас крестьянка с постели, и поп был уже тут как тут. Но теперь мы оставим их вдвоем, а сами пойдем вместе с крестьянином. Между тем он уже далеко отошел, чтоб поскорее взобраться на гору Геккерли; вот идет он, торопится и встречает на пути своего кума. А был его кум торговец яйцами и возвращался как раз с рынка, где продал яйца.

- Здорово! - говорит ему кум. - Куда это ты, куманек, так торопишься?

- Да вот, кум, во святые места, - отвечает крестьянин, - жена у меня заболела, а слыхал я нынче в проповеди господина пастора, что ежели у кого в доме имеется больной ребенок или больной муж, больная жена, больной отец, больная мать, сестра больная, брат или кто другой из семьи, то пусть тот отправится на богомолье на гору Геккерли в Вёлишланд, где целая осьмина лаврового листа стоит один крейцер, - и выздоровеет у того враз больной ребенок, больной муж, больная жена, больной отец, больная мать, сестра больная, брат или кто другой из семьи; вот и взял я у господина пастора мешок для лаврового листа и крейцер и иду теперь на богомолье.

- Но послушай, куманек, - говорит кум крестьянину, - неужто ты такой простофиля, что всему этому поверил? Знаешь, в чем дело? Да ведь попу охота провести с твоей женой весь день вдвоем в полное свое удовольствие, потому они тебя и околпачили, чтоб ты им не мешал.

- Да что ты? - сказал крестьянин. - Хотел бы я проверить, правда ли это.

- Ну, - сказал кум, - знаешь что, садись-ка ты ко мне в корзину от яиц, а я тебя домой отнесу, и ты все сам увидишь.

Сказано - сделано; посадил кум крестьянина к себе в корзину и принес его домой. Как пришли они домой - го-го, как там весело было! Зарезала крестьянка почти все, что у ней во дворе находилось, напекла пышек, и поп уже был тут как тут и притащил с собой скрипку. Постучался кум в дверь; спрашивает крестьянка, кто там такой.

- Кума, да это я, - говорит кум, - пустите меня нынче на ночлег, яиц-то я на рынке нынче не продал, приходится мне их домой тащить, а они-то ведь очень тяжелые, мне их не донести, да и на дворе уже темень какая.

- Да, куманек, - говорит крестьянка, - пришли вы что-то не во-время.

Ну, ничего не поделаешь, входите, забирайтесь на печь, на лежанку подальше.

Вот забрался кум со своею корзиной на печь; а поп и крестьянка были уже навеселе.

Вот поп и говорит:

- Слушай, голубушка, ты ведь умеешь петь так хорошо; спой-ка мне что-нибудь.

- Ах, - говорит крестьянка, - петь я уж теперь разучилась, вот в молодые годы умела я петь хорошо, а теперь это прошло.

- Э, да спой, - говорит снова поп, - хоть немножко.

И начала крестьянка петь:

Я муженька, однако, ловко отослала

На гору Геккерли, теперь одна осталась.

А тут и поп за нею запел:

И хорошо б ему там целый год остаться,

Да все с мешком по Геккерли бы шляться.

Аллилуйя!

А там на печке и кум запел себе тоже (надо сказать вам, что звали крестьянина Гильдебрандом), затянул он песенку:

Гильдебранд, любезный мой,

Что ж забрался ты на печку, дорогой?

Аллилуйя!

А там запел и крестьянин в корзине:

Таких я песенок не в силах больше вынесть,

Хочу скорее из корзины вылезть.

Вылезает он из корзины и начинает попа бить, колотить; и прогнал его так из дому.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.