ENGLISH

Old Hildebrand

中文

老希尔德布朗


Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her. The peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, "Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I'll tell you what; on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing so until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately."
"I will manage it," said the woman promptly. Now therefore on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did everything for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, "I feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end I should like to hear the parson's sermon that he is going to preach to-day." On that the peasant said, "Ah, my child, do not do it -- thou mightest make thyself worse if thou wert to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell thee everything the parson says."

"Well," said the woman, "go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that thou hearest." So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and would make a pilgimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly, and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, "Hurrah! dear wife, it is now almost the same thing as if thou wert well! The parson has preached to-day that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whoever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that thou mayst get well the faster," and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the woman got up, and the parson was there directly.

But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peasant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill, and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. "May you be blessed," said the gossip, "where are you off to so fast?"

"To all eternity, my friend," said the peasant, "my wife is ill, and I have been to-day to hear the parson's sermon, and he preached that if any one had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage." - "But listen, gossip," said the egg-merchant to the peasant, "are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don't you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way."

"My word!" said the peasant. "How I'd like to know if that's true!"

"Come, then," said the gossip, "I'll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself." So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket and carried him home.

When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merry there! The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes, and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and woman asked who was there. "It is I, gossip," said the egg-merchant, "give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already."

"Indeed, my friend," said the woman, "thou comest at a very inconvenient time for me, but as thou art here it can't be helped, come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove." Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parso, however, and the woman, were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, "Listen, my dear friend, thou canst sing beautifully; sing something to me." - "Oh," said the woman, "I cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that's all over now."

"Come," said the parson once more, "do sing some little song."

On that the woman began and sang,

"I've sent my husband away from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy."
Thereupon the parson sang,
"I wish 'twas a year before he came back,
I'd never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack."
Hallelujah.
Then the gossip who was in the background began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,
"What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear,
There on the bench by the stove so near?"

Hallelujah.
And then the peasant sang from his basket,
"All singing I ever shall hate from this day,
And here in this basket no longer I'll stay."
Hallelujah.
And he got out of the basket, and cudgelled the parson out of the house.
从前有一个农夫和他的老婆,村里的牧师迷恋着他的老婆,早就希望和她痛痛快快地过一天,农夫的老婆也有此意。 一天,牧师对农妇说:"听着,我的朋友,我想出一招,我们可以痛痛快快地在一起过一天。我来告诉你,礼拜三那天,你必须躺在床上别起来,告诉你丈夫你病了,使劲呻吟,就跟真的病了一样,你一直得装病装到礼拜天,那天我要布道,在布道中我会说无论谁家里有生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何的病人,谁就要去意大利的高克利山朝圣,在那里用一个铜板买一配克的桂树叶,生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何的病人马上就能药到病除,恢复健康。"
"我会想法子的。"农妇立即答应。 礼拜三一到,农妇就按商定的办法躺在床上大声地呻吟,不停地折腾,她的丈夫为她想尽了办法,可丝毫不见效,礼拜天到了,农妇嘱咐:"我已经病入膏肓,来日不多了,我想在临死前作一件事,就是聆听牧师今天的布道。"农夫闻言道:"啊哈,我的宝贝,你可不能动,如果你起来,你的身体会更糟糕的。这样吧,我去参加布道,我会仔细听的,然后把牧师的话一字不漏地告诉你。"
"那好啊,"农妇说:"去吧,用心听,回来后给我重复一遍。"农夫去听布道,牧师讲无论谁家里有生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何的病人,谁就该去意大利的高克利山朝圣,在那里用一个铜板买一配克的桂树叶,生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何病人马上就能药到病除,恢复健康。 谁要去朝圣,弥撒完后找他,他会提供装桂树叶的口袋和铜板。 听完牧师的一番话,最高兴的就数农夫了,他随即找到牧师,拿到装桂树叶的口袋和铜板。 事情办妥后,他就往家走,还没进家门就喊道:"哈哈!亲爱的老婆,现在你简直就跟病好了一样!牧师在布道中说无论谁家里有生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何病人,谁就要去意大利的高克利山朝圣,在那里用一个铜板买一配克的桂树叶,生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何病人马上就会药到病除,恢复健康,我现在已经从牧师那儿拿到口袋和铜板,为了你早日康复,我这就起程。"说完他就走了。 他刚刚离去,牧师就到了,牧师进来的时候,农妇还没起来。
放下这一对暂且不提,先去看看农夫,他步履如飞,分秒不停,为了早到高克利山心急如焚 ,半路上遇到了他的侃山老友。 他的侃友是个作鸡蛋生意的,他刚在市场卖完鸡蛋出来。 "上帝保佑,"侃友问道:"你这么着急是上哪儿去呀?""感谢上帝,我的朋友,"农夫答:"我的老婆生病了,我今天去听了牧师的布道,他讲无论谁家里有生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何病人,谁就要去意大利的高克利山朝圣,在那里用一个铜板买一配克的桂树叶,生病的孩子、生病的丈夫、生病的老婆、生病的父亲、生病的母亲、生病的兄弟姐妹或其他任何病人马上就会药到病除,恢复健康,我已经从牧师那儿拿到口袋和铜板,现在去朝圣。""听着,侃友,"鸡蛋贩子对农夫说,"你是真的傻到连这种鬼话都相信吗?你知道那意味什么吗?牧师想和你老婆单独风流一天,不愿意被别人看见,所以他编造了个借口把你支开。"
"天地良心!"农夫叫道:"我不能相信这是真的!""过来,"侃友说:"我告诉你怎么做。坐进我的鸡蛋筐里,我把你背回家,到时你自己看吧。"事情就这么定了,侃友把农夫放到筐里,背着他往家走。
当他们到家时,啊哈! 这里可真是热闹非凡呀! 农家院里的家禽几乎都被农妇杀光了,她还烙了薄饼,牧师也在场,他随身带着提琴。 侃友敲敲门,农妇问道是谁。 "是我,侃友,"鸡蛋贩子答道,"我想借住一宿。鸡蛋在市场上没卖掉,我只好把鸡蛋背回家,天已经黑了,而且鸡蛋太沉,我实在背不动啦。"
"可真是的,我的朋友,"农妇说:"你来得太不凑巧了,可是你已经到了这儿,没办法。进来吧 ,坐在火炉边上的板凳上歇歇脚吧。 "然后她把侃友和他背上的筐子安置到火炉旁边的板凳上。牧师和农妇享尽风流,无比快乐,最后,牧师提议:"听着,我亲爱的朋友,你的歌唱得很好听,给我唱首歌吧。 ""噢,"农妇说,"我现在唱不了。 年轻的时候,我的确唱得不错,可那个时代已经是一去不复返啦。 "
"来吧,"牧师再次请求,"唱首情歌。"
农妇不再坚持,她开始唱道:
"意大利有座山叫高克利,
我把我的丈夫支到那里。 "
接着是牧师唱:
"我希望他离去一年不回,
桂树叶口袋归他我永远不想。
哈里路亚。 "
这时在后房的侃友开始唱(我得告诉你那农夫叫希尔德布朗),侃友唱到道:
"你在干什么,我亲爱的希尔德布朗,
你准备在火炉边的凳子上呆上多长?
哈里路亚。 "
然后农夫在筐子里也跟着唱:
"今天我唱歌是气不打一处来,
在这筐里我是一刻也不想呆。
哈里路亚。 "
一边唱,他一边从筐子里爬了出来,用鞭子将牧师抽出门外。




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