ENGLISH

The jew among thorns

日本語

いばらの中のユダヤ人


There was once a rich man, who had a servant who served him diligently and honestly: He was every morning the first out of bed, and the last to go to rest at night; and, whenever there was a difficult job to be done, which nobody cared to undertake, he was always the first to set himself to it. Moreover, he never complained, but was contented with everything, and always merry.
When a year was ended, his master gave him no wages, for he said to himself, "That is the cleverest way; for I shall save something, and he will not go away, but stay quietly in my service. The servant said nothing, but did his work the second year as he had done it the first; and when at the end of this, likewise, he received no wages, he made himself happy, and still stayed on.

When the third year also was past, the master considered, put his hand in his pocket, but pulled nothing out. Then at last the servant said, "Master, for three years I have served you honestly, be so good as to give me what I ought to have, for I wish to leave, and look about me a little more in the world."

"Yes, my good fellow," answered the old miser; "you have served me industriously, and, therefore, you shall be cheerfully rewarded;" And he put his hand into his pocket, but counted out only three farthings, saying, "There, you have a farthing for each year; that is large and liberal pay, such as you would have received from few masters."

The honest servant, who understood little about money, put his fortune into his pocket, and thought, "Ah! now that I have my purse full, why need I trouble and plague myself any longer with hard work!" So on he went, up hill and down dale; and sang and jumped to his heart's content. Now it came to pass that as he was going by a thicket a little man stepped out, and called to him, "Whither away, merry brother? I see you do not carry many cares." - "Why should I be sad?" answered the servant; "I have enough; three years' wages are jingling in my pocket." - "How much is your treasure?" the dwarf asked him. "How much? Three farthings sterling, all told." - "Look here," said the dwarf, "I am a poor needy man, give me your three farthings; I can work no longer, but you are young, and can easily earn your bread."

And as the servant had a good heart, and felt pity for the old man, he gave him the three farthings, saying, "Take them in the name of Heaven, I shall not be any the worse for it."

Then the little man said, "As I see you have a good heart I grant you three wishes, one for each farthing, they shall all be fulfilled."

"Aha?" said the servant, "you are one of those who can work wonders! Well, then, if it is to be so, I wish, first, for a gun, which shall hit everything that I aim at; secondly, for a fiddle, which when I play on it, shall compel all who hear it to dance; thirdly, that if I ask a favor of any one he shall not be able to refuse it."

"All that shall you have," said the dwarf; and put his hand into the bush, and only think, there lay a fiddle and gun, all ready, just as if they had been ordered. These he gave to the servant, and then said to him, "Whatever you may ask at any time, no man in the world shall be able to deny you."

"Heart alive! What can one desire more?" said the servant to himself, and went merrily onwards. Soon afterwards he met a Jew with a long goat's-beard, who was standing listening to the song of a bird which was sitting up at the top of a tree. "Good heavens," he was exclaiming, "that such a small creature should have such a fearfully loud voice! If it were but mine! If only someone would sprinkle some salt upon its tail!"

"If that is all," said the servant, "the bird shall soon be down here;" And taking aim he pulled the trigger, and down fell the bird into the thorn-bushes. "Go, you rogue," he said to the Jew, "and fetch the bird out for yourself!"

"Oh!" said the Jew, "leave out the rogue, my master, and I will do it at once. I will get the bird out for myself, as you really have hit it." Then he lay down on the ground, and began to crawl into the thicket.

When he was fast among the thorns, the good servant's humor so tempted him that he took up his fiddle and began to play. In a moment the Jew's legs began to move, and to jump into the air, and the more the servant fiddled the better went the dance. But the thorns tore his shabby coat from him, combed his beard, and pricked and plucked him all over the body. "Oh dear," cried the Jew, "what do I want with your fiddling? Leave the fiddle alone, master; I do not want to dance."

But the servant did not listen to him, and thought, "You have fleeced people often enough, now the thorn-bushes shall do the same to you;" and he began to play over again, so that the Jew had to jump higher than ever, and scraps of his coat were left hanging on the thorns. "Oh, woe's me! cried the Jew; I will give the gentleman whatsoever he asks if only he leaves off fiddling a purse full of gold." - "If you are so liberal," said the servant, "I will stop my music; but this I must say to your credit, that you dance to it so well that it is quite an art;" and having taken the purse he went his way.

The Jew stood still and watched the servant quietly until he was far off and out of sight, and then he screamed out with all his might, "You miserable musician, you beer-house fiddler! wait till I catch you alone, I will hunt you till the soles of your shoes fall off! You ragamuffin! just put five farthings in your mouth, and then you may be worth three halfpence!" and went on abusing him as fast as he could speak. As soon as he had refreshed himself a little in this way, and got his breath again, he ran into the town to the justice.

"My lord judge," he said, "I have come to make a complaint; see how a rascal has robbed and ill-treated me on the public highway! a stone on the ground might pity me; my clothes all torn, my body pricked and scratched, my little all gone with my purse, good ducats, each piece better than the last; for God's sake let the man be thrown into prison!"

"Was it a soldier," said the judge, "who cut you thus with his sabre?" - "Nothing of the sort!" said the Jew; "it was no sword that he had, but a gun hanging at his back, and a fiddle at his neck; the wretch may easily be known."

So the judge sent his people out after the man, and they found the good servant, who had been going quite slowly along, and they found, too, the purse with the money upon him. As soon as he was taken before the judge he said, "I did not touch the Jew, nor take his money; he gave it to me of his own free will, that I might leave off fiddling because he could not bear my music." - "Heaven defend us!" cried the Jew, "his lies are as thick as flies upon the wall."

But the judge also did not believe his tale, and said, "This is a bad defence, no Jew would do that." And because he had committed robbery on the public highway, he sentenced the good servant to be hanged. As he was being led away the Jew again screamed after him, "You vagabond! you dog of a fiddler! now you are going to receive your well-earned reward!" The servant walked quietly with the hangman up the ladder, but upon the last step he turned round and said to the judge, "Grant me just one request before I die."

"Yes, if you do not ask your life," said the judge. "I do not ask for life," answered the servant, "but as a last favor let me play once more upon my fiddle." The Jew raised a great cry of "Murder! murder! for goodness' sake do not allow it! Do not allow it!" But the judge said, "Why should I not let him have this short pleasure? it has been granted to him, and he shall have it." However, he could not have refused on account of the gift which had been bestowed on the servant.

Then the Jew cried, "Oh! woe's me! tie me, tie me fast!" while the good servant took his fiddle from his neck, and made ready. As he gave the first scrape, they all began to quiver and shake, the judge, his clerk, and the hangman and his men, and the cord fell out of the hand of the one who was going to tie the Jew fast. At the second scrape all raised their legs, and the hangman let go his hold of the good servant, and made himself ready to dance. At the third scrape they all leaped up and began to dance; the judge and the Jew being the best at jumping. Soon all who had gathered in the market-place out of curiosity were dancing with them; old and young, fat and lean, one with another. The dogs, likewise, which had run there got up on their hind legs and capered about; and the longer he played, the higher sprang the dancers, so that they knocked against each other's heads, and began to shriek terribly.

At length the judge cried, quite of breath, "I will give you your life if you will only stop fiddling." The good servant thereupon had compassion, took his fiddle and hung it round his neck again, and stepped down the ladder. Then he went up to the Jew, who was lying upon the ground panting for breath, and said, "You rascal, now confess, whence you got the money, or I will take my fiddle and begin to play again." - "I stole it, I stole it! cried he; "but you have honestly earned it." So the judge had the Jew taken to the gallows and hanged as a thief.
昔、金持ちの男がいました。その男には真面目によく働いて仕えた下男がいました。この下男は毎朝一番先に起きて、夜一番あとに休んで寝ました。誰も引き受けたがらない難しい仕事があるときはいつも、この下男が一番先にとりかかりました。それだけでなく、決して文句を言わないで何でも満足し、いつもほがらかでした。

一年の務めが終わったとき主人は下男に手当てを出しませんでした。というのは(これが一番賢いやり方だわい。金を節約できるし、あいつは出ていかないで黙って務めるだろうからな)と思ったのです。下男は何も言わないで一年目と同じように二年目も仕事をしました。それで二年目の終りにも手当てを受け取りませんでしたが、楽しそうにしてやはりとどまって務め続けました。

三年目も過ぎたとき、主人は考えて、ポケットに手をつっこみましたが、何もとりだしませんでした。するととうとう下男が、「だんなさん、私は三年間真面目に務めました、お願いですから、その分のお手当をください。私は出ていってもう少し世間を見てまわりたいのです。」と言いました。
「いいとも、そうだな」と年とったけちんぼは答えました。「お前はよく務めてくれたよ、だから気持ちよく手当てをだせるよ。」そうしてポケットに手を入れましたが、たった三ファージングだけ数えて、「ほら、毎年一ファージングだ。これは大した金で気前のいいことだぞ。こんなに払ってくれるだんなはあまりいないだろうよ。」と言いました。
真正直な下男は、お金のことをほとんど知らなかったので、財産をポケットに入れ、(さあ、財布はいっぱいになったし、もうきつい仕事をしてくよくよしたりあくせくすることはないぞ)と思いました。

そうして出かけていき、山を登り谷に下り、心ゆくまで歌ったり跳ねたりしました。さてあるとき、やぶを通りすぎているときに小人が出てきて、下男に呼びかけました。「どこへ行くんだい、陽気な兄さん?何も心配事がないようだね。」「何で落ち込むことがある?」と下男が答えました。「たっぷりあるんだ。三年分の手当てがポケットでチャリンチャリンしているのさ。」
「お宝はいくらあるんだい?」と小人は尋ねました。「いくらか?全部で、しっかり三ファージングさ」「あのね」と小人は言いました。「わしは貧しくて困ってる男だ。その三ファージングをおくれ。わしはもう働けないが、あんたは若くて簡単にパンを稼げるしな。」
下男はやさしい心の持ち主でその年寄りを可哀そうに思い、「じゃあやるよ、おれはその金が無くても大丈夫だろうから」と言って三ファージングをあげました。すると小人が、「あんたは心がやさしいとわかるから、願いを三つかなえてやろう。一ファージングに一つでな、全部叶えてやるよ。」と言いました。
「へえ!」と下男は言いました。「あんたは不思議な術を使う人たちの一人なんだな。うん、じゃあ、そういうことなら、先ず、銃を願おう、狙った獲物に必ず当たるやつな。二番目は、バイオリンだな、それを弾くと、聞こえるやつはどうしても踊らなくちゃいけないやつ。三番目に、おれが頼んだら、だれでも断れないようにしてもらいたいな。」
「それをみんな叶えてあげよう」と小人は言ってやぶに手をつっこみました。するとどうでしょう、もうバイオリンと銃が、まるで注文を受けたように、準備してありました。これらを小人は下男に渡して、それから言いました。「いつでも何を頼もうと、世界中の誰もあんたを断れない。」
(信じられない!これ以上望むものがあるか?)と下男は独り言を言い、上機嫌で進んでいきました。

それからまもなく、下男は長いヤギひげのユダヤ人に出会いました。ユダヤ人は木のてっぺんにとまっている小鳥の歌に耳を傾けて立っていました。「なんとまあ!」とユダヤ人は感嘆の声をあげました。「あんな小さな生き物があんなに大きな声を出すとは!あれがわしのものならいいのになあ。だれかあの尻尾に塩を振りかけ(注)てくれればなあ。」
「それだけなら」と下男は言いました。「すぐ鳥をここに落としてやろう」そして狙いをつけ、引き金を引きました。すると小鳥はいばらのやぶに落ちました。「行けよ、この悪党」と下男はユダヤ人に言いました。「自分で鳥をとってこい!」
「おう!」とユダヤ人は言いました。「悪党は抜きですよ、だんな、そうすれば私がすぐにやりますよ。あんたが本当に当てたんだから、自分でとりにいきます。」それからユダヤ人は地面にふせて、やぶに這って行きはじめました。

ユダヤ人がすっかりいばらの間に入ると、人の良い下男は試してみたい気分になり、バイオリンをとり上げて弾き出しました。途端にユダヤ人の脚が動き始め、宙に跳びはね、下男が弾けば弾くほど踊りも激しくなりました。しかし、いばらがユダヤ人のみすぼらしい上着を引き裂き、ひげを櫛削り、体じゅうを刺したりひっかいたりしました。「わあ!」とユダヤ人は叫びました。「バイオリンを弾いてほしくありませんよ。バイオリンをやめてください、だんな、私は踊りたくないんです。」
しかし下男は耳を貸さないで、(お前は人々からさんざん金品を巻き上げてきたじゃないか。今度はいばらのやぶがお前に同じことをするのさ)と思っていました。

そしてまた繰り返し弾き始めたので、ユダヤ人は一そう高く跳ねて上着の切れはしがあちこちいばらにひっかかっていました。「わあ、ひどい!」とユダヤ人は叫びました。「バイオリンを止めてくれさえすれば、だんなに何でもあげます、金がいっはい入ってる財布だってあげます。」「お前がそんなに気前がいいなら」と下男は言いました。「音楽をやめるよ。でもほめて言わなくちゃな。お前は踊りがすごくうまくて商売できるくらいだ。」そして財布を受け取ると歩いて先へ進みました。

ユダヤ人は立ち止まって、遠くに見えなくなるまで黙って下男をみつめていました。それから、声を限りに叫びました。「やい、けちな楽士!ビアホールのバイオリン弾き!待ってろよ、お前だけのときとっつかまえてやる。お前の靴底が抜け落ちるまで追うからな、このごろつき!口に5ファージング入れてみろ、そうしたらお前は3個の半ペンスしか値打ちがないんだぞ。」そして口から出るだけ早口に悪口を言い続けました。こういうふうにして少し気分がすっきりして息をつぐとすぐ、ユダヤ人は町の裁判官のところへ走っていきました。

「裁判官どの」とユダヤ人は言いました。「私は訴えにまいりました。天下の公道で悪党が私から盗み、ひどい目にあわせました。地面の石だって私をあわれに思うでしょう。服はぼろぼろに引き裂かれ、体中刺されたりひっかかれたりしました。あるだけの金も財布ごととられました。きれいなダカット金貨でどれもこれもぴかぴかのものです。お願いですから、その男を牢屋に入れてください。」「それは兵士だったのか?」と裁判官は言いました。「お前をそういうふうにサーベルで切りつけたのか?」「そういうんじゃないんです!」とユダヤ人は言いました。「あいつが持っていたのは刀なんかじゃなくて、背中に鉄砲をしょって、首にバイオリンをかけてました。あいつはすぐにわかりますよ。」

そこで裁判官は家来たちにその男を追わせました。家来たちは、ゆっくり歩いていた人の良い下男を見つけ、身につけていた財布も見つけました。裁判官の前にひきだされるとすぐ、下男は、「そのユダヤ人に手を触れていないし、お金もとっていません。自分から私にくれたんですよ。私の音楽が我慢できないからバイオリンを弾くのをやめてもらおうとしてね。」と言いました。「冗談じゃない!」とユダヤ人は叫びました。「嘘八百だ。あいつは壁に群がるハエの数と同じくらい嘘をついてるんだ。」

しかし、裁判官も下男の話を信じないで、言いました。「下手な言い訳だ。ユダヤ人ならそんなことはしないだろうよ。」そして天下の公道で強盗をはたらいたとして、人のよい下男に縛り首の刑を言い渡しました。下男がひかれていくときもまた、ユダヤ人は後ろから叫びました。「このごろつき!バイオリン弾きの犬野郎!これでお前もふさわしい報いを受けるんだ」下男は首吊り役人と一緒に黙ってはしごを登っていきましたが、最後の段で向きを変え、裁判官に言いました。「死ぬ前にただ一つだけ頼みをきいてもらえませんか」

「いいとも、命乞いをするのでなければな」と裁判官は言いました。「命乞いはしません。」と下男は答えました。「だが、最後のお願いとして、もう一度バイオリンを弾かせてください。」ユダヤ人は大声をあげました。「殺せ!殺せ!頼むからそれを許さないでください!それを許すな!」しかし裁判官は「どうしてこの短い楽しみを許さないでいよう。もう認めたのだ。バイオリンを弾くがよい。」と言いました。ところが実は、裁判官は下男に授けられた贈り物のために断れなかったのです。

するとユダヤ人は叫びました。「ああ!なんと悲しいことだ!私を縛ってくれ!しっかり縛ってくれ!」一方、人の良い下男は首からバイオリンをはずし、用意しました。下男がギィと最初にひと弾きすると、裁判官も、書記も、首吊り役人も、その下役人も、みんなが揺れ動き出し、ユダヤ人をきつく縛ろうとしていた人の手から紐が落ちました。二回目にギィと弾くと、みんな脚を上げ、首吊り役人は人のよい下男を放して踊る用意をしました。三回目にギィと鳴らすと、みんな飛びあがって踊りはじめました。裁判官とユダヤ人が一番上手に跳ねました。じきに、もの珍しさから広場に集まっていたみんなが一緒に踊り出しました。老いも若きも、太ったのもやせたのも、みんな一緒になって踊りました。そこを走っていた犬たちもまた、後ろ足で立ってはね回りました。下男が長く弾けば弾くほど、踊り手たちは高く飛びあがって、お互いに頭をぶつけあい、おそろしい悲鳴をあげはじめました。

とうとう裁判官が、息を切らしながら叫びました。「バイオリンをやめてくれれば命を助けてやるぞ。」それで人の良い下男は可哀そうになり、バイオリンをやめてまた首にかけ、はしごを降りていきました。それから、息を切らしてぜいぜいいいながら地面に転がっていたユダヤ人に近づいていくと、言いました。「このごろつきめ、さあ、あの金をどこからとってきたか白状しろ。さもないとバイオリンをもってまた弾き始めるぞ。」「盗みました!、盗みました!」とユダヤ人は叫びました。「だけどあなたはまっとうに手に入れたんです。」そこで裁判官はユダヤ人を首つり台にひったてさせ、泥棒として縛り首にしました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.