ENGLISH

The iron stove

日本語

鉄のストーブ


In the days when wishing was still of some use, a King's son was bewitched by an old witch, and shut up in an iron stove in a forest. There he passed many years, and no one could deliver him. Then a King's daughter came into the forest, who had lost herself, and could not find her father's kingdom again. After she had wandered about for nine days, she at length came to the iron stove. Then a voice came forth from it, and asked her, "Whence comest thou, and whither goest, thou?" She answered, "I have lost my father's kingdom, and cannot get home again." Then a voice inside the iron stove said, "I will help thee to get home again, and that indeed most swiftly, if thou wilt promise to do what I desire of thee. I am the son of a far greater King than thy father, and I will marry thee."
Then was she afraid, and thought, "Good heavens! What can I do with an iron stove?" But as she much wished to get home to her father, she promised to do as he desired. But he said, "Thou shalt return here, and bring a knife with thee, and scrape a hole in the iron." Then he gave her a companion who walked near her, but did not speak, but in two hours he took her home; there was great joy in the castle when the King's daughter came home, and the old King fell on her neck and kissed her. She, however, was sorely troubled, and said, "Dear father, what I have suffered! I should never have got home again from the great wild forest, if I had not come to an iron stove, but I have been forced to give my word that I will go back to it, set it free, and marry it." Then the old King was so terrified that he all but fainted, for he had but this one daughter. They therefore resolved they would send, in her place, the miller's daughter, who was very beautiful. They took her there, gave her a knife, and said she was to scrape at the iron stove. So she scraped at it for four-and-twenty hours, but could not bring off the least morsel of it. When day dawned, a voice in the stove said, "It seems to me it is day outside." Then she answered, "It seems so to me too; I fancy I hear the noise of my father's mill."

"So thou art a miller's daughter! Then go thy way at once, and let the King's daughter come here." Then she went away at once, and told the old King that the man outside there, would have none of her he wanted the King's daughter. They, however, still had a swine-herd's daughter, who was even prettier than the miller's daughter, and they determined to give her a piece of gold to go to the iron stove instead of the King's daughter. So she was taken thither, and she also had to scrape for four-and-twenty hours. She, however, made nothing of it. When day broke, a voice inside the stove cried, "It seems to me it is day outside!" Then answered she, "So it seems to me also; I fancy I hear my father's horn blowing."

"Then thou art a swine-herd's daughter! Go away at once, and tell the King's daughter to come, and tell her all must be done as promised, and if she does not come, everything in the kingdom shall be ruined and destroyed, and not one stone be left standing on another." When the King's daughter heard that she began to weep, but now there was nothing for it but to keep her promise. So she took leave of her father, put a knife in her pocket, and went forth to the iron stove in the forest. When she got there, she began to scrape, and the iron gave way, and when two hours were over, she had already scraped a small hole. Then she peeped in, and saw a youth so handsome, and so brilliant with gold and with precious jewels, that her very soul was delighted. Now, therefore, she went on scraping, and made the hole so large that he was able to get out. Then said he, "Thou art mine, and I am thine; thou art my bride, and hast released me." He wanted to take her away with him to his kingdom, but she entreated him to let her go once again to her father, and the King's son allowed her to do so, but she was not to say more to her father than three words, and then she was to come back again. So she went home, but she spoke more than three words, and instantly the iron stove disappeared, and was taken far away over glass mountains and piercing swords; but the King's son was set free, and no longer shut up in it. After this she bade good-bye to her father, took some money with her, but not much, and went back to the great forest, and looked for the iron stove, but it was nowhere to be found. For nine days she sought it, and then her hunger grew so great that she did not know what to do, for she could no longer live. When it was evening, she seated herself in a small tree, and made up her mind to spend the night there, as she was afraid of wild beasts. When midnight drew near she saw in the distance a small light, and thought, "Ah, there I should be saved!" She got down from the tree, and went towards the light, but on the way she prayed. Then she came to a little old house, and much grass had grown all about it, and a small heap of wood lay in front of it. She thought, "Ah, whither have I come," and peeped in through the window, but she saw nothing inside but toads, big and little, except a table well covered with wine and roast meat, and the plates and glasses were of silver. Then she took courage, and knocked at the door. The fat toad cried,


"Little green waiting-maid,
Waiting-maid with the limping leg,
Little dog of the limping leg,
Hop hither and thither,
And quickly see who is without:"
and a small toad came walking by and opened the door to her. When she entered, they all bade her welcome, and she was forced to sit down. They asked, "Where hast thou come from, and whither art thou going?" Then she related all that had befallen her, and how because she had transgressed the order which had been given her not to say more than three words, the stove, and the King's son also, had disappeared, and now she was about to seek him over hill and dale until she found him. Then the old fat one said,

"Little green waiting-maid,
Waiting-maid with the limping leg,
Little dog of the limping leg,
Hop hither and thither,
And bring me the great box."
Then the little one went and brought the box. After this they gave her meat and drink, and took her to a well-made bed, which felt like silk and velvet, and she laid herself therein, in God's name, and slept. When morning came she arose, and the old toad gave her three needles out of the great box which she was to take with her; they would be needed by her, for she had to cross a high glass mountain, and go over three piercing swords and a great lake. If she did all this she would get her lover back again. Then she gave her three things, which she was to take the greatest care of, namely, three large needles, a plough-wheel, and three nuts. With these she travelled onwards, and when she came to the glass mountain which was so slippery, she stuck the three needles first behind her feet and then before them, and so got over it, and when she was over it, she hid them in a place which she marked carefully. After this she came to the three piercing swords, and then she seated herself on her plough-wheel, and rolled over them. At last she arrived in front of a great lake, and when she had crossed it, she came to a large and beautiful castle. She went and asked for a place; she was a poor girl, she said, and would like to be hired. She knew, however, that the King's son whom she had released from the iron stove in the great forest was in the castle. Then she was taken as a scullery-maid at low wages. But, already the King's son had another maiden by his side whom he wanted to marry, for he thought that she had long been dead.
In the evening, when she had washed up and was done, she felt in her pocket and found the three nuts which the old toad had given her. She cracked one with her teeth, and was going to eat the kernel when lo and behold there was a stately royal garment in it! But when the bride heard of this she came and asked for the dress, and wanted to buy it, and said, "It is not a dress for a servant-girl." But she said no, she would not sell it, but if the bride would grant her one thing she should have it, and that was, leave to sleep one night in her bridegroom's chamber. The bride gave her permission because the dress was so pretty, and she had never had one like it. When it was evening she said to her bridegroom, "That silly girl will sleep in thy room." - "If thou art willing so am I," said he. She, however, gave him a glass of wine in which she had poured a sleeping-draught. So the bridegroom and the scullery-maid went to sleep in the room, and he slept so soundly that she could not waken him.

She wept the whole night and cried, "I set thee free when thou wert in an iron stove in the wild forest, I sought thee, and walked over a glass mountain, and three sharp swords, and a great lake before I found thee, and yet thou wilt not hear me!"

The servants sat by the chamber-door, and heard how she thus wept the whole night through, and in the morning they told it to their lord. And the next evening when she had washed up, she opened the second nut, and a far more beautiful dress was within it, and when the bride beheld it, she wished to buy that also. But the girl would not take money, and begged that she might once again sleep in the bridegroom's chamber. The bride, however, gave him a sleeping-drink, and he slept so soundly that he could hear nothing. But the scullery-maid wept the whole night long, and cried, "I set thee free when thou wert in an iron stove in the wild forest, I sought thee, and walked over a glass mountain, and over three sharp swords and a great lake before I found thee, and yet thou wilt not hear me!" The servants sat by the chamber-door and heard her weeping the whole night through, and in the morning informed their lord of it. And on the third evening, when she had washed up, she opened the third nut, and within it was a still more beautiful dress which was stiff with pure gold. When the bride saw that she wanted to have it, but the maiden only gave it up on condition that she might for the third time sleep in the bridegroom's apartment. The King's son was, however, on his guard, and threw the sleeping-draught away. Now, therefore, when she began to weep and to cry, "Dearest love, I set thee free when thou wert in the iron stove in the terrible wild forest," the King's son leapt up and said, "Thou art the true one, thou art mine, and I am thine." Thereupon, while it was still night, he got into a carriage with her, and they took away the false bride's clothes so that she could not get up. When they came to the great lake, they sailed across it, and when they reached the three sharp-cutting swords they seated themselves on the plough-wheel, and when they got to the glass mountain they thrust the three needles in it, and so at length they got to the little old house; but when they went inside that, it was a great castle, and the toads were all disenchanted, and were King's children, and full of happiness. Then the wedding was celebrated, and the King's son and the princess remained in the castle, which was much larger than the castles of their fathers. As, however, the old King grieved at being left alone, they fetched him away, and brought him to live with them, and they had two kingdoms, and lived in happy wedlock.


A mouse did run,
This story is done.
願い事がまだ人の役に立っていた頃に、王様の息子が年とった魔女に魔法をかけられ、森の鉄のストーブに閉じ込められました。誰も王子を救うことができないままそこで王子は何年も過ごしました。すると王様の娘が森に入り、道に迷い、父親の国に帰ることができませんでした。娘は9日間あちこちさ迷い、しまいには鉄のストーブのところにやってきました。

するとストーブから声が出て、「あなたはどこから来たんですか?どこへ行くんですか」と娘に尋ねました。娘は「父の国がわからなくなって、家に帰れないのです。」と答えました。すると鉄のストーブの中の声が言いました。「家へ帰るお手伝いをしましょう。しかも本当に速く。もしあなたが私の望むことをしてくれると約束すればね。私はあなたの父親よりはるかに大きな国の王様の息子なのです。そしてあなたと結婚するつもりです。」

それで王女はこわくなり、「まあ、鉄のストーブなんてどうしたらいいの?」と思いましたが、父親のところへとても帰りたかったので、望み通りにすると約束しました。しかし、王子は言いました。「ここに戻り、ナイフを持って来てください。それで鉄を削って穴を空けてください」それから王子は王女にお供をつけました。お供は王女の近くを歩きましたが、口をきかないで、二時間で王女を家へ連れて行きました。王様の娘が帰るとお城では大喜びし、年とった王様は娘の首に抱きついてキスしました。しかし娘はひどく困って、「お父様、困っているの。もし鉄のストーブに会わなかったら、私は大きな荒れた森から二度と戻ってこれなかったわ。だけど、ストーブのところに戻って自由にしてやり結婚するって約束させられたの。」と言いました。

すると年とった王様はとても驚いてもう少しで気を失うところでした。というのは王様にはこの娘一人しかいなかったからです。それで二人は王女の代わりにとても美しい粉屋の娘をやろうと決めました。二人は粉屋の娘をそこに連れていき、ナイフを渡し、鉄のストーブを削らなくてはいけないと言いました。それで娘は24時間削りましたが、少しもはがせませんでした。夜が明けると、ストーブの中から声がしました。「外は夜が明けたようだね。」それで娘は「そのようですね。お父さんの水車の音が聞こえるような気がします。」と答えました。「さてはお前は粉屋の娘だな。それじゃすぐ帰り、王様の娘をここによこしなさい。」

それで娘はすぐに立ち去り、年とった王様に、あそこの人は私ではなく王様の娘を望んでいます、と言いました。それで年とった王様は仰天し、娘は泣きました。しかし、粉屋の娘よりもっと美しい豚飼いの娘がいたので、二人はその娘に金貨を一枚渡し、王様の娘の代わりに鉄のストーブのところに行かせることにしました。それで娘はそこに連れて行かれ、この娘も24時間削ることになりました。ところがこの娘も粉屋の娘と同じでした。夜が明けると、ストーブの中の声が叫びました。「外は夜が明けたようだな。」「そのようですね。お父さんの鳴らす角笛が聞こえるようだわ。」と娘は答えました。「それではお前は豚飼いの娘だな。すぐに帰り、王様の娘に来るように言いなさい。それで約束した通りにしなくてはならないと言ってください。もし王女が来ないと国を滅ぼし石一つ立たなくしてやるとね。」

王様の娘はそれを聞くと泣き出しましたが、今となっては約束を守るしかありませんでした。それで父親に別れを告げ、ポケットにナイフをいれて森の鉄のストーブのところにでかけました。そこに着いて削り始めると、鉄がはがれ、二時間も経つともう小さい穴があきました。それで王女が中を覗くと見えたのはとてもハンサムな若者で金と宝石でとてもきらきらしていたので王女は喜びました。それで王女は削り続け、とても大きな穴をあけたので王子はストーブから出ることができました。

すると王子は言いました。「君は僕のもので、僕は君のものだ。君は僕の花嫁で、僕を魔法から解いてくれた。」王子は王女を自分の国へ連れていこうとしましたが、王女はもう一度父親のところへ行かせてくださいと頼みました。王様の息子は、そうすることを許しましたが、王女は父親に三語より多く言ってはいけない、それからもう一度戻ってくるように、と言いました。それで王女は家へ帰りましたが、三語より多く話してしまい、途端に鉄のストーブは消え、ガラスの山を越え、尖った剣を越えて、はるかかなたに連れ去られてしまいました。しかし、王様の息子は解放されていてもうその中に閉じ込められていませんでした。このあと、王女は父親に別れを告げ、あまりたくさんではありませんがいくらかお金を持ち、大きな森に戻り、鉄のストーブを探しましたがどこにも見つかりませんでした。

9日間王女はストーブを探しました。するととてもお腹がすいてきてどうしたらよいかわかりませんでした。王女は何も食べる物をもっていなかったのです。夕方になると野の獣がこわいので小さな木に座り、そこで夜を過ごそうと決めました。真夜中ごろに遠くに小さな明かりが見えた時、「ああ、あそこに行けば助かる」と思いました。王女は木から下りて、その明かりの方へ行きましたが途中祈りました。それから小さな古い家に着き、その家のまわりはたくさん草が生い茂り、家の前には木が小さな山になっていました。「あら、どこに来たのかしら?」と王女は思って、窓から覗きこみましたが、中には大なり小なりヒキガエルしか見えませんでした。他にはワインと焼き肉がのったテーブルがあり、皿やグラスは銀でできていました。それから王女は勇気をふるって戸をたたきました。すぐに太ったヒキガエルが叫びました。「小さな緑の女中、這い脚の女中、這い脚の小犬、あちこちぴょんぴょん跳ねて、外にだれがいるか速くみておいで」

そして小さなヒキガエルが歩いて来て、戸を開けてくれました。王女が入ると、みんな歓迎の言葉をいい、王女は座らされました。ヒキガエルたちは「どこから来たんですか、どこへ行くんですか」と尋ねました。それで王女は自分の身に起こったことを語り、三語以上言わないようにという命令に背いたので、ストーブが王様の息子もろとも、消えてしまったこと、今は王子を見つけるまで山や谷を越えてさがすつもりだ、と言いました。すると年とって太ったヒキガエルが言いました。「小さな緑の女中、這い脚の女中、這い脚の小犬、あちこちぴょんぴょん跳ねて、大きな箱を持っておいで」

すると小さなヒキガエルが行って箱を持ってきました。このあと、みんなは王女に食べ物と飲み物をくれ、良く整えたベッドに連れて行きました。そのベッドは絹とビロウドのような感じで、王女はそこにねてお祈りし、眠りました。朝が来て王女が起きると、年とったヒキガエルは大きな箱から三本の針を王女に渡し、これを持って行くように、高いガラスの山を越えて三つの尖った剣と大きな湖を越えて行かなければならないのだからこれらが必要になるだろうから、これを全部やるとまた恋人を取り戻せるだろう、といいました。

それでそれをとても大事にしておくように、と言って三つの品、三本の大きな針と鋤車と三個のクルミ、を渡しました。これらの品を持って王女は先に進み、とてもつるつるしているガラスの山にきたとき、先に三本の針を足の後ろに刺し、それから前に刺して、山を越えていきました。山を越えてから注意して印をつけたところに針を隠しました。このあと、三本の尖った剣のところにきて、その時は鋤車に乗って転がりながら越えました。とうとう大きな湖に着いて、そこを渡り終えると大きな美しい城に来ました。王女は出かけて働き口をお願いしました。「私は貧しい娘です。雇ってもらえないでしょうか」と王女は言いました。そうはいっても、王女は、大きな森で鉄のストーブから救った王様の息子がその城にいると知っていました。それで王女は安いお金で食器洗い場の女中に雇われました。しかし王様の息子はもう結婚しようと思っている別の娘をそばにおいていました。王子は王女がとっくに死んでしまったと思っていたからです。

夕方に洗ってしまい仕事が終わると、王女はポケットをさぐり、年とったヒキガエルがくれた三個のクルミを見つけました。一個を歯で割り、実を食べようとしました。すると何と、品のある王家の服が入っていました。しかし、花嫁はこれを聞くとやってきて、ドレスを欲しくなり買いたいと思って、「召使が着るドレスではないでしょう」と言いました。王女は、いいえ、売りません、でも一つ願いを認めてくれるなら差し上げましょう、それは花婿の部屋で一晩眠ることを許して下さることです、と言いました。花嫁はそのドレスがとてもきれいで、同じようなものは持ったことがなかったので許可しました。

夜になると花嫁は花婿に、「あの馬鹿な女中があなたの部屋で眠りたがっています。」と言いました。「君がいいなら、僕もいいよ。」と花婿は言いました。ところが、花嫁は眠り薬をいれたワインを花婿にのませました。それで花婿と女中は部屋で寝に行き、花婿はとてもぐっすり眠ったので女中は起こすことができませんでした。女中は一晩中泣いて言いました。「私は荒れた森であなたが鉄のストーブの中にいたとき、あなたを救いました。私はあなたを探し、ガラスの山や三本の鋭い剣や大きな湖を越え、あなたをみつけました。それなのにあなたは私の言うことを聞こうとしないのね。」家来たちが部屋の戸のそばにいて、こんなふうに夜通し泣いているのが聞こえ、朝にそれを主人に話しました。

次の日の夕方洗い物が終わり、王女は二個目のクルミを開いてみると、もっとずっときれいなドレスが中に入っていました。花嫁はそれをみるとまたそのドレスも買いたいと思いました。しかし女中はお金を受け取らずもう一度花婿の部屋で眠りたいと頼みました。ところが、花嫁は花婿に眠り薬を飲ませたので、花婿はぐっすり眠り、何も聞こえませんでした。しかし女中は一晩中泣いて言いました。「私は荒れた森であなたが鉄のストーブの中にいたとき、あなたを救いました。私はあなたを探し、ガラスの山や三本の鋭い剣や大きな湖を越え、あなたをみつけました。それなのにあなたは私の言うことを聞こうとしないのね。」家来たちが部屋の戸のそばにいて、女中が夜通し泣いているのが聞こえ、朝にそれを主人に話しました。

三日目の番に洗い物が終わると王女は三個目のクルミを開きました。中には純金がいっぱいのもっと美しいドレスが入っていました。花嫁はそれを見て欲しいと思いましたが、娘は花婿の部屋で3回目に眠らせてくれるなら、という条件で渡すだけでした。ところが、王様の息子は警戒して眠り薬を捨ててしまいました。女中が泣きだして、「愛するあなた、私は、あなたが恐ろしい荒れた森で鉄のストーブの中にいたとき、あなたを救いました。」とかき口説くと、王様の息子は跳び起きて、「あなたが本当の花嫁だ。あなたは私のもので、私はあなたのものだ。」と言いました。

そのあとすぐ、まだ夜のうちに、王子は王女と一緒に馬車に乗り、偽の花嫁が起きられないようにその服を持ち去りました。二人は大きな湖にくると船で渡り、三本の鋭い剣のところに着いた時は鋤車に乗り、ガラスの山に着いた時は三本の針を山に刺し、とうとう小さな古い家に着きました。しかし、二人が中に入ると、それは大きなお城になり、ヒキガエルたちは魔法が解けて王様の子供たちになり、大喜びしました。それから結婚式のお祝いがあり、王様の息子と王女はその城に残りました。それは二人の父親たちの城よりはるかに大きいものでした。しかし、年とった王様が一人残されたのを悲しんだので、二人は王様を迎えに行き、一緒に暮らすため連れてきました。それで二人は二つの国を持ち、幸せに暮らしました。ネズミが走ったわよ。お話はおしまいです。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.