ENGLISH

The griffin

日本語

怪鳥グライフ


There was once upon a time a King, but where he reigned and what he was called, I do not know. He had no son, but an only daughter who had always been ill, and no doctor had been able to cure her. Then it was foretold to the King that his daughter should eat herself well with an apple. So he ordered it to be proclaimed throughout the whole of his kingdom, that whosoever brought his daughter an apple with which she could eat herself well, should have her to wife, and be King. This became known to a peasant who had three sons, and he said to the eldest, "Go out into the garden and take a basketful of those beautiful apples with the red cheeks and carry them to the court; perhaps the King's daughter will be able to eat herself well with them, and then thou wilt marry her and be King." The lad did so, and set out.
When he had gone a short way he met a little iron man who asked him what he had there in the basket, to which replied Uele, for so was he named, "Frogs' legs." On this the little man said, "Well, so shall it be, and remain," and went away. At length Uele arrived at the palace, and made it known that he had brought apples which would cure the King's daughter if she ate them. This delighted the King hugely, and he caused Uele to be brought before him; but, alas! when he opened the basket, instead of having apples in it he had frogs' legs which were still kicking about. On this the King grew angry, and had him driven out of the house. When he got home he told his father how it had fared with him. Then the father sent the next son, who was called Seame, but all went with him just as it had gone with Uele. He also met the little iron man, who asked what he had there in the basket. Seame said, "Hogs' bristles," and the iron man said, "well, so shall it be, and remain." When Seame got to the King's palace and said he brought apples with which the King's daughter might eat herself well, they did not want to let him go in, and said that one fellow had already been there, and had treated them as if they were fools. Seame, however, maintained that he certainly had the apples, and that they ought to let him go in. At length they believed him, and led him to the King. But when he uncovered the basket, he had but hogs' bristles. This enraged the King most terribly, so he caused Seame to be whipped out of the house. When he got home he related all that had befallen him, then the youngest boy, whose name was Hans, but who was always called Stupid Hans, came and asked his father if he might go with some apples. "Oh!" said the father, "thou wouldst be just the right fellow for such a thing! If the clever ones can't manage it, what canst thou do?" The boy, however, did not believe him, and said, "Indeed, father, I wish to go." - "Just get away, thou stupid fellow, thou must wait till thou art wiser," said the father to that, and turned his back. Hans, however, pulled at the back of his smock- frock and said, "Indeed, father, I wish to go." - "Well, then, so far as I am concerned thou mayst go, but thou wilt soon come home again!" replied the old man in a spiteful voice. The boy, however, was tremendously delighted and jumped for joy. "Well, act like a fool! thou growest more stupid every day!" said the father again. Hans, however, did not care about that, and did not let it spoil his pleasure, but as it was then night, he thought he might as well wait until the morrow, for he could not get to court that day. All night long he could not sleep in his bed, and if he did doze for a moment, he dreamt of beautiful maidens, of palaces, of gold, and of silver, and all kinds of things of that sort. Early in the morning, he went forth on his way, and directly afterwards the little shabby-looking man in his iron clothes, came to him and asked what he was carrying in the basket. Hans gave him the answer that he was carrying apples with which the King's daughter was to eat herself well. "Then," said the little man, "so shall they be, and remain." But at the court they would none of them let Hans go in, for they said two had already been there who had told them that they were bringing apples, and one of them had frogs' legs, and the other hogs' bristles. Hans, however, resolutely maintained that he most certainly had no frogs' legs, but some of the most beautiful apples in the whole kingdom. As he spoke so pleasantly, the door-keeper thought he could not be telling a lie, and asked him to go in, and he was right, for when Hans uncovered his basket in the King's presence, golden-yellow apples came tumbling out. The King was delighted, and caused some of them to be taken to his daughter, and then waited in anxious expectation until news should be brought to him of the effect they had. But before much time had passed by, news was brought to him: but who do you think it was who came? it was his daughter herself! As soon as she had eaten of those apples, she was cured, and sprang out of her bed. The joy the King felt cannot be described! but now he did not want to give his daughter in marriage to Hans, and said he must first make him a boat which would go quicker on dry land than on water. Hans agreed to the conditions, and went home, and related how it had fared with him. Then the father sent Uele into the forest to make a boat of that kind. He worked diligently, and whistled all the time. At mid-day, when the sun was at the highest, came the little iron man and asked what he was making? Uele gave him for answer, "Wooden bowls for the kitchen." The iron man said, "So it shall be, and remain." By evening Uele thought he had now made the boat, but when he wanted to get into it, he had nothing but wooden bowls. The next day Seame went into the forest, but everything went with him just as it had done with Uele. On the third day Stupid Hans went. He worked away most industriously, so that the whole forest resounded with the heavy strokes, and all the while he sang and whistled right merrily. At mid-day, when it was the hottest, the little man came again, and asked what he was making? "A boat which will go quicker on dry land than on the water," replied Hans, " and when I have finished it, I am to have the King's daughter for my wife." - "Well," said the little man, "such an one shall it be, and remain." In the evening, when the sun had turned into gold, Hans finished his boat, and all that was wanted for it. He got into it and rowed to the palace. The boat went as swiftly as the wind. The King saw it from afar, but would not give his daughter to Hans yet, and said he must first take a hundred hares out to pasture from early morning until late evening, and if one of them got away, he should not have his daughter. Hans was contented with this, and the next day went with his flock to the pasture, and took great care that none of them ran away.

Before many hours had passed came a servant from the palace, and told Hans that he must give her a hare instantly, for some visitors had come unexpectedly. Hans, however, was very well aware what that meant, and said he would not give her one; the King might set some hare soup before his guest next day. The maid, however, would not believe in his refusal, and at last she began to get angry with him. Then Hans said that if the King's daughter came herself, he would give her a hare. The maid told this in the palace, and the daughter did go herself. In the meantime, however, the little man came again to Hans, and asked him what he was doing there? He said he had to watch over a hundred hares and see that none of them ran away, and then he might marry the King's daughter and be King. "Good," said the little man, "there is a whistle for thee, and if one of them runs away, just whistle with it, and then it will come back again." When the King's daughter came, Hans gave her a hare into her apron; but when she had gone about a hundred steps with it, he whistled, and the hare jumped out of the apron, and before she could turn round was back to the flock again. When the evening came the hare-herd whistled once more, and looked to see if all were there, and then drove them to the palace. The King wondered how Hans had been able to take a hundred hares to graze without losing any of them; he would, however, not give him his daughter yet, and said he must now bring him a feather from the Griffin's tail. Hans set out at once, and walked straight forwards. In the evening he came to a castle, and there he asked for a night's lodging, for at that time there were no inns. The lord of the castle promised him that with much pleasure, and asked where he was going? Hans answered, "To the Griffin." - "Oh! to the Griffin! They tell me he knows everything, and I have lost the key of an iron money-chest; so you might be so good as to ask him where it is." - "Yes, indeed," said Hans, "I will do that." Early the next morning he went onwards, and on his way arrived at another castle in which he again stayed the night. When the people who lived there learnt that he was going to the Griffin, they said they had in the house a daughter who was ill, and that they had already tried every means to cure her, but none of them had done her any good, and he might be so kind as to ask the Griffin what would make their daughter healthy again? Hans said he would willingly do that, and went onwards. Then he came to a lake, and instead of a ferry-boat, a tall, tall man was there who had to carry everybody across. The man asked Hans whither he was journeying? "To the Griffin," said Hans. "Then when you get to him," said the man, "just ask him why I am forced to carry everybody over the lake." - "Yes, indeed, most certainly I'll do that," said Hans. Then the man took him up on his shoulders, and carried him across. At length Hans arrived at the Griffin's house, but the wife only was at home, and not the Griffin himself. Then the woman asked him what he wanted? Thereupon he told her everything;--that he had to get a feather out of the Griffin's tail, and that there was a castle where they had lost the key of their money-chest, and he was to ask the Griffin where it was?--that in another castle the daughter was ill, and he was to learn what would cure her?--and then not far from thence there was a lake and a man beside it, who was forced to carry people across it, and he was very anxious to learn why the man was obliged to do it. Then said the woman, "But look here, my good friend, no Christian can speak to the Griffin; he devours them all; but if you like, you can lie down under his bed, and in the night, when he is quite fast asleep, you can reach out and pull a feather out of his tail, and as for those things which you are to learn, I will ask about them myself." Hans was quite satisfied with this, and got under the bed. In the evening, the Griffin came home, and as soon as he entered the room, said, "Wife, I smell a Christian." - "Yes," said the woman, "one was here to-day, but he went away again;" and on that the Griffin said no more.

In the middle of the night when the Griffin was snoring loudly, Hans reached out and plucked a feather from his tail. The Griffin woke up instantly, and said, "Wife, I smell a Christian, and it seems to me that somebody was pulling at my tail." His wife said, "Thou hast certainly been dreaming, and I told thee before that a Christian was here to-day, but that he went away again. He told me all kinds of things that in one castle they had lost the key of their money-chest, and could find it nowhere." - "Oh! the fools!" said the Griffin; "the key lies in the wood- house under a log of wood behind the door." - "And then he said that in another castle the daughter was ill, and they knew no remedy that would cure her." - "Oh! the fools!" said the Griffin; "under the cellar-steps a toad has made its nest of her hair, and if she got her hair back she would be well." - "And then he also said that there was a place where there was a lake and a man beside it who was forced to carry everybody across." - "Oh, the fool!" said the Griffin; "if he only put one man down in the middle, he would never have to carry another across." Early the next morning the Griffin got up and went out. Then Hans came forth from under the bed, and he had a beautiful feather, and had heard what the Griffin had said about the key, and the daughter, and the ferry-man. The Griffin's wife repeated it all once more to him that he might not forget it, and then he went home again. First he came to the man by the lake, who asked him what the Griffin had said, but Hans replied that he must first carry him across, and then he would tell him. So the man carried him across, and when he was over Hans told him that all he had to do was to set one person down in the middle of the lake, and then he would never have to carry over any more. The man was hugely delighted, and told Hans that out of gratitude he would take him once more across, and back again. But Hans said no, he would save him the trouble, he was quite satisfied already, and pursued his way. Then he came to the castle where the daughter was ill; he took her on his shoulders, for she could not walk, and carried her down the cellar-steps and pulled out the toad's nest from beneath the lowest step and gave it into her hand, and she sprang off his shoulder and up the steps before him, and was quite cured. Then were the father and mother beyond measure rejoiced, and they gave Hans gifts of gold and of silver, and whatsoever else he wished for, that they gave him. And when he got to the other castle he went at once into the wood- house, and found the key under the log of wood behind the door, and took it to the lord of the castle. He also was not a little pleased, and gave Hans as a reward much of the gold that was in the chest, and all kinds of things besides, such as cows, and sheep, and goats. When Hans arrived before the King, with all these things--with the money, and the gold, and the silver and the cows, sheep and goats, the King asked him how he had come by them. Then Hans told him that the Griffin gave every one whatsoever he wanted. So the King thought he himself could make such things useful, and set out on his way to the Griffin; but when he got to the lake, it happened that he was the very first who arrived there after Hans, and the man put him down in the middle of it and went away, and the King was drowned. Hans, however, married the daughter, and became King.
昔、どこの国を治め、何という名前かは知りませんが、王さまがいました。王様には息子がいなくて娘がただ一人いましたが、ずっと具合が悪く、治せる医者がいませんでした。そうして、りんごを食べると娘は健康を回復する、という予言が王さまに伝えられました。そこで王様は、健康を回復するりんごを娘に持ってきた者に娘を妻として与え王にする、というお触れを国じゅうに出しました。

息子が三人いるお百姓がこれを知り、上の息子に、「庭に行って頬の赤いりっぱなりんごをかごいっぱいもってきなさい。そして宮廷に持って行くんだ。ひょっとすると王様の娘はそのりんごを食べて元気になれるかもしれないからな。そうしたらお前はお姫様と結婚し王様になれるぞ。」と言いました。若者はそうして出かけて行きました。少しばかり行くと、白髪の小人に出会いました。小人は、「かごに何が入ってるんだい?」と聞きました。するとユーレは、それがこの若者の名前ですが、「蛙の脚だよ」と答えました。これを聞いて小人は、「そうか、じゃ、ずっとそういうことにしておこう」と言って去って行きました。とうとうユーレは宮殿に着き、りんごをお持ちしました、お姫さまが召しあがればご病気が治るでしょう、と知らせました。王様はそれを聞いてとても喜び、ユーレを連れて来させました。ところが何としたことでしょう、かごを開けると、中にはりんごではなく蛙の脚が入っていて、まだあちこち蹴っていました。これを見て王様は怒り、ユーレを宮殿から追い出させました。

家に着くとユーレは父親にどうなったか話しました。そこで父親はゼーメという名の次の息子を行かせましたが、ユーレと全く同じになりました。ゼーメも白髪の小人に出会い、小人は、かごに何が入ってるんだい?と聞きました。ゼーメは、「豚の毛だよ」と言いました。すると、白髪の小人は、「そうか、じゃ、ずっとそういうことにしておこう」と言いました。ゼーメが王様の宮殿に着き、りんごをお持ちしました、これでお姫様は元気になるでしょう、と言うと、門番はゼーメを中に入れようとしないで、前に一人ここにきたやつがおれたちを馬鹿扱いしやがった、と言いました。ところがゼーメは、確かにりんごをお持ちしたのです、中に入れてください、と言い張りました。とうとう門番もゼーメの言うことを信じて、王様のところへ連れて行きました。しかしかごのふたをあけると、豚の剛毛しか入っていませんでした。それで王様はこの上なく怒って、ゼーメをムチで打たせて城から追い出させました。

家に帰ってゼーメはどんな目にあったか語りました。すると、ハンスという名前でしたがいつも馬鹿ハンスと呼ばれている末の子がやってきて、父親に、僕もりんごを持って行ってもいいかい?と聞きました。「おや」と父親は言いました。「そんなことはまだ無理だろうな。賢いやつができないのに、お前に何ができる?」ところが、男の子はしつこくせがんで、「ねえ、お父さん、僕も行きたいよ」と言いました。「もうあっちへ行け、この間抜けめ、もっと賢くなるまで待つんだ」と父親は言って、背を向けました。ところがハンスは父親の上っ張りの後ろを引っ張って、「ねえってば、お父さん、行きたいよ」と言いました。「それじゃ、行ってもいいが、どうせすぐまた家に帰ることになるさ。」と父親は意地悪い声で答えました。男の子はとても喜んでわーいととびあがりました。「ふん、馬鹿をやってろよ。お前って子は日増しに馬鹿になるな。」と父親はまた言いました。それでも、ハンスはやる気を失くしたりしょげたりしませんでした。しかし、そのときは夜だったので、今日は宮廷につけないから、明日まで待った方がいいと思いました。夜通しハンスはベッドで眠れませんでした。少しうとうとすると、美しい乙女たちや宮殿や金や銀やそういうことを夢にみました。

朝早くハンスはでかけました。するとそのあとすぐに、氷のような白い服を着たみすぼらしい小人がやってきて、かごに何が入っているんだい?と聞きました。ハンスは、りんごだよ、お姫様が食べたら、元気になるんだ、と返事をしました。すると小人は、「そうか、じゃ、ずっとそういうことにしておこう」と言いました。

しかし、宮廷では誰もハンスを入れようとしませんでした。門番が言うには、もう二人来てりんごを持ってきたと言ったが、一人は蛙の脚でもう一人は豚の毛だったからということでした。ところがハンスは、私がもってきたのは絶対蛙の脚ではなく国じゅうで一番すばらしいりんごなんです、と必死になって言い続けました。ハンスの話し方がとても感じのいいものだったので、門番は、うそをついてるようにはみえないな、と思い、入るように言いました。そして門番は正しかったのです。というのはハンスが王様の前でかごをあけると黄金色のりんごが何個も出てきたからです。

王様は喜んで、いくつかを娘のところへ持っていかせ、りんごの効き目があったかどうか知らせがくるまで心配と期待の入り混じった気持ちで待ちました。しかし、あまり経たないうちに、知らせがもたらされました。やってきたのは誰だと思いますか?それは娘自身でした。娘ははりんごを食べるとすぐに病気が治ってベッドから跳び起きました。王様の喜びようは言葉で言い表せません。しかし、そうなると王様は娘をハンスと結婚させたくありませんでした。それで、ハンスに、乾いた陸の上を水の上よりも速く走る舟を結婚より先に作らねばならない、と言いました。ハンスはその条件をのみ、家に帰り、どうだったか話しました。すると父親はそういう舟を作らせにユ―レを森にやりました。ユーレは口笛をずっと吹きながら、熱心に働きました。

昼に、太陽が一番高く上がったころ、白髪の小人がやってきて、何を作ってるんだい?と尋ねました。ユーレは「木のお椀だよ」と返事をしました。小人は「ずっとそういうことにしておこう」と言いました。夕方頃、ユーレは、さあ舟を作ったぞ、と思いましたが、乗ってみようとしたら、木のお椀しかありませんでした。次の日はゼーメが森へ入りましたが、何もかもユーレと同じことになりました。三日目には馬鹿ハンスが行きました。ハンスはとても熱心に働き、強く打ちつける音が森じゅうにこだましました。そのあいだずっとハンスは楽しそうに歌ったり口笛を吹いたりしました。昼に、一番暑いころ、小人がまたやってきて、何を作ってるんだい?と尋ねました。「陸の上で水の上より速く走る舟だよ」とハンスは答えました。「それを作ったら、お姫様を嫁さんにするんだ。」「じゃあ」と小人は言いました。「ずっとそういうことにしておこう。」

夕方に、太陽が金色に変わってしまったころ、ハンスは舟と舟に必要なもの全部を作り終えました。ハンスは舟に乗り、宮殿に漕いでいきました。舟は風のように速く進みました。王様はそれを遠くから見ましたが、まだ娘をハンスにやろうとはしませんでした。そして、その前に、100匹のうさぎを朝早くから夜遅くまで牧草地に連れていかねばならない、一匹でもいなくなったら、娘をやらないぞ、と言いました。ハンスはこれを承知しました。次の日、うさぎの群れを牧草地に連れて行き、一匹も逃げ出さないようよく気をつけました。

何時間も経たないうちに宮殿から侍女がやってきて、ハンスに、すぐうさぎを一匹ください、不意にお客さんがきてしまったので、と言いました。ところが、ハンスはそれがどういう意味か全くよくわかっていたので、うさぎをあげません、王様は明日お客さんにうさぎのスープを出したらいいのに、と言いました。

ところが、侍女はハンスが断っても聞き入れようとしないで、しまいにはハンスと言い合いになり始めました。そこでハンスは、お姫様自身がいらしたら、一匹さしあげます、と言いました。侍女はこれを宮殿で話し、実際に娘自身がやってきました。

その間に小人がまたハンスのところにきて、そこで何をしてるんだい?と尋ねました。ハンスは、100匹のうさぎの番をして一匹も逃げないようにしなくちゃいけないんだ、そうしたらお姫様と結婚して王様になれるんだ、と言いました。「いいね」と小人はいいました。「お前に笛をやろう。一匹でも逃げだしたら、それを吹けばいい。そうしたら戻ってくるから。」王様の娘が来たとき、ハンスはうさぎを一匹娘のエプロンに入れてやりました。しかし娘がうさぎを連れて100歩ほど行ったときハンスは笛を吹きました。するとうさぎはエプロンから飛び出て、娘が振り向く前に群れのところに戻りました。夕方になるとうさぎ番はもう一度笛を吹き、うさぎが全部いるか確かめてから、うさぎを追い立てて宮殿へいきました。

王様は、どうしてハンスが一匹も見失わず100匹のうさぎの番ができたのか不思議に思いましたが、やはりまだ娘をやりたくありませんでした。そして、今度はグライフ鳥の羽根をもってこなければならん、と言いました。ハンスはすぐに出発し、まっすぐ進んでいきました。ゆうがたにあるお城にたどりつくと、ハンスはそこで一晩泊めてくれるようお願いしました。というのはそのころは宿屋というものがなかったからです。城の主人はとても喜んで承知し、どこへ行くのか?と尋ねました。ハンスは、「グライフ鳥のところへ」と答えました。「へえ、グライフ鳥のところへねえ。グライフ鳥というのは何でも知ってるそうですよ。私は鉄の金庫の鍵を失くしたんだが、どこにあるかきいてきてもらえませんか?」「ええ、いいですとも」とハンスは言いました。「やってあげますよ。」

次の朝早くハンスは出かけて先へ進みました。途中で別の城に着き、そこでまた泊りました。そこにすんでいる人たちはハンスがグライフ鳥のところへ行くと知ると、家に病気の娘がいまして、治そうともういろいろ手を尽くしたんですが、何も効き目がありません、どうしたら娘を元気にできるかグライフ鳥にきいてもらえませんか?と言いました。ハンスは、ええ、いいですとも、と承知しました。そうして進んでいくと湖にやってきました。渡し舟のかわりに背の高い、高い男がそこにいてみんなを担いで渡さなければなりませんでした。男はハンスにどこへいくんだい?と尋ねました。「グライフ鳥のところへ」とハンスは言いました。「それじゃあ、着いたら」と男は言いました。「どうしておれがみんなを担いで渡さなければいけないのかグライフ鳥に聞いてくれないか」「いいとも、必ず聞いてあげるよ」とハンスは言いました。すると男はハンスを肩にのせ、川を渡らせてくれました。

とうとうハンスはグライフ鳥の家に着きました。しかし、おかみさんだけが家にいて、グライフ鳥本人は留守でした。するとおかみさんはハンスに、どんなご用ですか?と尋ねました。そこでハンスはおかみさんに全部話し、グライフ鳥の羽根を一枚手に入れなければいけないんです、また金庫の鍵を失くしたお城があって、どこに鍵があるかグライフ鳥にきかなければいけないし、別の城では娘が病気でどうしたら治るか知らなければなりません、それから、ここから遠くないところに湖があり、そのそばにいる男が人々を担いで渡らせなくてはいけないのですが、どうしてそうしなくてはいけないのか男がとても知りたがっているのです、と言いました。するとおかみさんが、「あのね、お前さんね、キリスト教徒はグライフ鳥と話すことはできないんだよ。グライフ鳥はキリスト教徒をみんな食べてしまうからね。だけど、よければベッドの下に入れるけどね。夜にグライフ鳥がぐっすり眠り込んだら、手を伸ばして尻尾から羽根を一枚抜けばいいよ。それからお前さんが知りたいことは、私が自分できいてあげるよ。」と言いました。ハンスはそれをきいてすっかり納得し、ベッドの下にもぐりました。

夕方に、グライフ鳥は帰って来て、部屋に入った途端、「おい、お前、キリスト教徒の匂いがするぞ」と言いました。「ええ」とおかみさんは言いました。「今日ひとりここに来ましたけど、すぐまた帰りましたよ。」するとグライフ鳥はもう何も言いませんでした。真夜中になってグライフ鳥が大いびきをかいているときにハンスは手を伸ばして尻尾から羽根を抜きました。途端にグライフ鳥が目を覚まし、「おい、お前、キリスト教徒の匂いがするぞ、それに誰かおれの尻尾を引っ張っているようなんだが」と言いました。おかみさんは「あんたはきっと夢を見てるんですよ。それに、キリスト教徒は今日ここに来たけどまた帰ったとさっき言ったでしょ。」と言いました。

「その人、いろんなことを言ったのよ、あるお城で金庫の鍵を失くしてどこにも見つけられないんですって」「ふん、馬鹿だな」とグライフ鳥が言いました。「鍵はまき小屋だよ、戸の後ろにある丸太のたきぎの下にあるのさ。」「それからね、別の城では娘が病気なんだけど、治し方がわからないんだと言ってたわ」「ふん、馬鹿だな」とグライフ鳥が言いました。「地下室へ行く階段の下に娘の髪の毛で巣を作ったのさ。その髪の毛を取り戻せば娘はよくなるんだがね。」「そうしてね、湖のところで岸にいる男がみんなを担いで渡らなければいけないという事も言ってたわね」「ふん、馬鹿だな」とグライフ鳥が言いました。「湖の真ん中で一人を降ろせば、あとは運ばなくてよくなるよ。」 

次の朝早く、グライフ鳥は起きて出かけました。するとハンスはベッドの下から出てきましたが、美しい羽根があり、鍵や娘や男についてグライフ鳥が言ったことをすっかり聞いていました。グライフ鳥のおかみさんは、ハンスが忘れないようにもう一回全部繰り返してくれました。そうしてハンスはまた帰っていきました。最初に湖のそばにいる男のところに来ました。

男は、グライフ鳥はどう言ってましたか?と尋ねました。しかし、ハンスは、先に向こう岸に渡してくれたら教えてあげよう、と答えました。それで男はハンスを向こう岸に運びました。渡り終えるとハンスは、湖の真ん中で一人降ろすだけでいいんだ、そうしたらもう二度と担いで渡らなくてよくなるよ、と言いました。男はとても喜んで、お礼にもう一回向こう岸に渡してまた戻ってあげよう、とハンスに言いました。しかし、ハンスは、いやいいよ、そんな手間をかけなくても、もうすっかり満足してるから、と言って、道を進みました。それから、娘が病気の城に来ました。ハンスは、娘が歩けなかったので背負って、地下室の階段を降り、一番下の段の下からひきがえるの巣を抜き取り、娘の手に渡しました。すると娘はハンスの背から飛び下りハンスより先に階段を登りすっかり治りました。そうして父親と母親はこの上なく喜んで、ハンスに金銀を贈りました。そうして他にハンスが望んだものは何でもくれました。それから、もう一つの城に着いた時、ハンスはすぐにまき小屋に入り、戸の後ろの丸太のたきぎの下に鍵をみつけ、それを城の主人に持って行きました。主人はとても喜んで、お礼に金庫に入っていた金をたくさんくれ、そのうえ牛や羊やヤギのようなものをいろいろくれました。

ハンスがこれらのお金や金銀や牛や羊やヤギを持って王様の前に着くと、王様はどうやってそれらを手に入れたのか?と尋ねました。そこでハンスは、グライフ鳥は誰でも欲しい人にくれるんです、と言いました。そこで王様は、わしもそういうものを手に入れよう、と思い、グライフ鳥のところへ出かけて行きました。しかし、湖に着くと、王様がたまたまハンスのあとでそこに行った最初だったので、男は湖の真ん中で王様を降ろして行ってしまいました。それで王様は溺れて死んでしまいました。一方ハンスは娘と結婚し、王様になりました。




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