ENGLISH

The hut in the forest

DEUTSCH

Das Waldhaus


A poor wood-cutter lived with his wife and three daughters in a little hut on the edge of a lonely forest. One morning as he was about to go to his work, he said to his wife, "Let my dinner be brought into the forest to me by my eldest daughter, or I shall never get my work done, and in order that she may not miss her way," he added, "I will take a bag of millet with me and strew the seeds on the path." When, therefore, the sun was just above the center of the forest, the girl set out on her way with a bowl of soup, but the field-sparrows, and wood-sparrows, larks and finches, blackbirds and siskins had picked up the millet long before, and the girl could not find the track. Then trusting to chance, she went on and on, until the sun sank and night began to fall. The trees rustled in the darkness, the owls hooted, and she began to be afraid. Then in the distance she perceived a light which glimmered between the trees. "There ought to be some people living there, who can take me in for the night," thought she, and went up to the light. It was not long before she came to a house the windows of which were all lighted up. She knocked, and a rough voice from inside cried, "Come in." The girl stepped into the dark entrance, and knocked at the door of the room. "Just come in," cried the voice, and when she opened the door, an old gray-haired man was sitting at the table, supporting his face with both hands, and his white beard fell down over the table almost as far as the ground. By the stove lay three animals, a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. The girl told her story to the old man, and begged for shelter for the night. The man said,
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," answered the animals, and that must have meant, "We are willing," for the old man said, "Here you shall have shelter and food, go to the fire, and cook us our supper." The girl found in the kitchen abundance of everything, and cooked a good supper, but had no thought of the animals. She carried the full dishes to the table, seated herself by the gray-haired man, ate and satisfied her hunger. When she had had enough, she said, "But now I am tired, where is there a bed in which I can lie down, and sleep?" The animals replied,
"Thou hast eaten with him,
Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
So find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
Then said the old man, "Just go upstairs, and thou wilt find a room with two beds, shake them up, and put white linen on them, and then I, too, will come and lie down to sleep." The girl went up, and when she had shaken the beds and put clean sheets on, she lay down in one of them without waiting any longer for the old man. After some time, however, the gray-haired man came, took his candle, looked at the girl and shook his head. When he saw that she had fallen into a sound sleep, he opened a trap-door, and let her down into the cellar.
Late at night the wood-cutter came home, and reproached his wife for leaving him to hunger all day. "It is not my fault," she replied, "the girl went out with your dinner, and must have lost herself, but she is sure to come back to-morrow." The wood-cutter, however, arose before dawn to go into the forest, and requested that the second daughter should take him his dinner that day. "I will take a bag with lentils," said he; "the seeds are larger than millet, the girl will see them better, and can't lose her way." At dinner-time, therefore, the girl took out the food, but the lentils had disappeared. The birds of the forest had picked them up as they had done the day before, and had left none. The girl wandered about in the forest until night, and then she too reached the house of the old man, was told to go in, and begged for food and a bed. The man with the white beard again asked the animals,


"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals again replied "Duks," and everything happened just as it had happened the day before. The girl cooked a good meal, ate and drank with the old man, and did not concern herself about the animals, and when she inquired about her bed they answered,

"Thou hast eaten with him, Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
To find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
When she was asleep the old man came, looked at her, shook his head, and let her down into the cellar.
On the third morning the wood-cutter said to his wife, "Send our youngest child out with my dinner to-day, she has always been good and obedient, and will stay in the right path, and not run about after every wild humble-bee, as her sisters did." The mother did not want to do it, and said, "Am I to lose my dearest child, as well?"

"Have no fear,' he replied, "the girl will not go astray; she is too prudent and sensible; besides I will take some peas with me, and strew them about. They are still larger than lentils, and will show her the way." But when the girl went out with her basket on her arm, the wood-pigeons had already got all the peas in their crops, and she did not know which way she was to turn. She was full of sorrow and never ceased to think how hungry her father would be, and how her good mother would grieve, if she did not go home. At length when it grew dark, she saw the light and came to the house in the forest. She begged quite prettily to be allowed to spend the night there, and the man with the white beard once more asked his animals,

"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And beautiful brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," said they. Then the girl went to the stove where the animals were lying, and petted the cock and hen, and stroked their smooth feathers with her hand, and caressed the brindled cow between her horns, and when, in obedience to the old man's orders, she had made ready some good soup, and the bowl was placed upon the table, she said, "Am I to eat as much as I want, and the good animals to have nothing? Outside is food in plenty, I will look after them first." So she went and brought some barley and stewed it for the cock and hen, and a whole armful of sweet- smelling hay for the cow. "I hope you will like it, dear animals," said she, "and you shall have a refreshing draught in case you are thirsty." Then she fetched in a bucketful of water, and the cock and hen jumped on to the edge of it and dipped their beaks in, and then held up their heads as the birds do when they drink, and the brindled cow also took a hearty draught. When the animals were fed, the girl seated herself at the table by the old man, and ate what he had left. It was not long before the cock and the hen began to thrust their heads beneath their wings, and the eyes of the cow likewise began to blink. Then said the girl, "Ought we not to go to bed?"
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals answered "Duks,"
"Thou hast eaten with us,
Thou hast drunk with us,
Thou hast had kind thought for all of us,
We wish thee good-night."
Then the maiden went upstairs, shook the feather-beds, and laid clean sheets on them, and when she had done it the old man came and lay down on one of the beds, and his white beard reached down to his feet. The girl lay down on the other, said her prayers, and fell asleep.
She slept quietly till midnight, and then there was such a noise in the house that she awoke. There was a sound of cracking and splitting in every corner, and the doors sprang open, and beat against the walls. The beams groaned as if they were being torn out of their joints, it seemed as if the staircase were falling down, and at length there was a crash as if the entire roof had fallen in. As, however, all grew quiet once more, and the girl was not hurt, she stayed quietly lying where she was, and fell asleep again. But when she woke up in the morning with the brilliancy of the sunshine, what did her eyes behold? She was lying in a vast hall, and everything around her shone with royal splendor; on the walls, golden flowers grew up on a ground of green silk, the bed was of ivory, and the canopy of red velvet, and on a chair close by, was a pair of shoes embroidered with pearls. The girl believed that she was in a dream, but three richly clad attendants came in, and asked what orders she would like to give? "If you will go," she replied, "I will get up at once and make ready some soup for the old man, and then I will feed the pretty little hen, and the cock, and the beautiful brindled cow." She thought the old man was up already, and looked round at his bed; he, however, was not lying in it, but a stranger. And while she was looking at him, and becoming aware that he was young and handsome, he awoke, sat up in bed, and said, "I am a King's son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals - and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace." And when they had arisen, the King's son ordered the three attendants to set out and fetch the father and mother of the girl to the marriage feast. "But where are my two sisters?" inquired the maiden. "I have locked them in the cellar, and to-morrow they shall be led into the forest, and shall live as servants to a charcoal-burner, until they have grown kinder, and do not leave poor animals to suffer hunger."
Ein armer Holzhauer lebte mit seiner Frau und drei Töchtern in einer kleinen Hütte an dem Rande eines einsamen Waldes. Eines Morgens, als er wieder an seine Arbeit wollte, sagte er zu seiner Frau: "Laß mir ein Mittagsbrot von dem ältesten Mädchen hinaus in den Wald bringen, ich werde sonst nicht fertig. Und damit es sich nicht verirrt," setzte er hinzu, "so will ich einen Beutel mit Hirse mitnehmen und die Körner auf den Weg streuen."

Als nun die Sonne mitten über dem Walde stand, machte sich das Mädchen mit einem Topf voll Suppe auf den Weg. Aber die Feld- und Waldsperlinge, die Lerchen und Finken, Amseln und Zeisige hatten die Hirse schon längst aufgepickt, und das Mädchen konnte die Spur nicht finden. Da ging es auf gut Glück immer fort, bis die Sonne sank und die Nacht einbrach. Die Bäume rauschten in der Dunkelheit, die Eulen schnarrten, und es fing an, ihm angst zu werden. Da erblickte es in der Ferne ein Licht, das zwischen den Bäumen blinkte. Dort sollten wohl Leute wohnen, dachte es, die mich über Nacht behalten, und ging auf das Licht zu. Nicht lange, so kam es an ein Haus, dessen Fenster erleuchtet waren. Es klopfte an, und eine rauhe Stimme rief von innen: "Herein!" Das Mädchen trat auf die dunkle Diele und pochte an die Stubentür. "Nur herein," rief die Stimme, und als es öffnete, saß da ein alter, eisgrauer Mann an dem Tisch, hatte das Gesicht auf die beiden Hände gestützt, und sein weißer Bart floß über den Tisch herab fast bis auf die Erde. Am Ofen aber lagen drei Tiere, ein Hühnchen, ein Hähnchen und eine buntgescheckte Kuh. Das Mädchen erzählte dem Alten sein Schicksal und bat um ein Nachtlager. Der Mann sprach:

"Schön Hühnchen,
Schön Hähnchen
Und du schöne bunte Kuh,
Was sagst du dazu?"

"Duks!" antworteten die Tiere, und das mußte wohl heißen 'wir sind es zufrieden', denn der Alte sprach weiter: "Hier ist Hülle und Fülle, geh hinaus an den Herd und koch uns ein Abendessen." Das Mädchen fand in der Küche Überfluß an allem und kochte eine gute Speise, aber an die Tiere dachte es nicht. Es trug die volle Schüssel auf den Tisch, setzte sich zu dem grauen Mann, aß und stillte seinen Hunger. Als es satt war, sprach es: "Aber jetzt bin ich müde, wo ist ein Bett, in das ich mich legen und schlafen kann?" Die Tiere antworteten:

"Du hast mit ihm gegessen,
Du hast mit ihm getrunken,
Du hast an uns gar nicht gedacht,
Nun sieh auch. wo du bleibst die Nacht."

Da sprach der Alte: "Steig nur die Treppe hinauf, so wirst du eine Kammer mit zwei Betten finden, schüttle sie auf und decke sie mit weißem Linnen, so will ich auch kommen und mich schlafen legen." Das Mädchen stieg hinauf, und als es die Betten geschüttelt und frisch gedeckt hatte, da legte es sich in das eine, ohne weiter auf den Alten zu warten. Nach einiger Zeit aber kam der graue Mann, beleuchtete das Mädchen mit dem Licht und schüttelte den Kopf. Und als er sah, daß es fest eingeschlafen war, öffnete er eine Falltüre und ließ es in den Keller sinken.

Der Holzhauer kam am späten Abend nach Haus und machte seiner Frau Vorwürfe, daß sie ihn den ganzen Tag habe hungern lassen. "Ich habe keine Schuld," antwortete sie, "das Mädchen ist mit dem Mittagessen hinausgegangen, es muß sich verirrt haben; morgen wird es schon wiederkommen." Vor Tag aber stand der Holzhauer auf, wollte in den Wald, verlangte, die zweite Tochter solle ihm diesmal das Essen bringen. "Ich will einen Beutel mit Linsen mitnehmen," sagte er, "die Körner sind größer als Hirse, das Mädchen wird sie besser sehen und kann den Weg nicht verfehlen." Zur Mittagszeit trug auch das Mädchen die Speise hinaus, aber die Linsen waren verschwunden: die Waldvögel hatten sie, wie am vorigen Tag, aufgepickt und keine übriggelassen. Das Mädchen irrte im Walde umher, bis es Nacht ward, da kam es ebenfalls zu dem Haus des Alten, ward hereingerufen und bat um Speise und Nachtlager. Der Mann mit dem weißen Barte fragte wieder die Tiere:

"Schön Hühnchen,
schön Hähnchen
Und du schöne bunte Kuh,
Was sagst du dazu?"

Die Tiere antworteten abermals: "Duks!" und es geschah alles wie am vorigen Tag. Das Mädchen kochte eine gute Speise, aß und trank mit dem Alten und kümmerte sich nicht um die Tiere. Und als es sich nach seinem Nachtlager erkundigte, antworteten sie:

"Du hast, mit ihm gegessen,
Du hast mit ihm getrunken,
Du hast an uns gar nicht gedacht,
Nun sieh auch, wo du bleibst die Nacht."

Als es eingeschlafen war, kam der Alte, betrachtete es mit Kopfschütteln und ließ es in den Keller hinab. Am dritten Morgen sprach der Holzhacker zu seiner Frau: "Schick unser jüngstes Kind mit dem Essen hinaus, das ist immer gut und gehorsam gewesen, das wird auf dem rechten Weg bleiben und nicht wie seine Schwestern, die wilden Hummeln, herumschwärmen." Die Mutter wollte nicht und sprach: "Soll ich mein liebstes Kind auch noch verlieren?" - "Sei ohne Sorge," antwortete er, "das Mädchen verirrt sich nicht, es ist zu klug und verständig; zum Überfluß will ich Erbsen mitnehmen und ausstreuen, die sind noch größer als Linsen und werden ihm den Weg zeigen." Aber als das Mädchen mit dem Korb am Arm hinauskam, so hatten die Waldtauben die Erbsen schon im Kropf, und es wußte nicht, wohin es sich wenden sollte. Es war voll Sorgen und dachte beständig daran, wie der arme Vater hungern und die gute Mutter jammern würde, wenn es ausblieb. Endlich, als es finster ward, erblickte es das Lichtchen und kam an das Waldhaus. Es bat ganz freundlich, sie möchten es über Nacht beherbergen, und der Mann mit dem weißen Bart fragte wieder seine Tiere:

"Schön Hühnchen,
Schön Hähnchen
Und du schöne bunte Kuh,
Was sagst du dazu?"

"Duks!" sagten sie. Da trat das Mädchen an den Ofen, wo die Tiere lagen, und liebkoste Hühnchen und Hähnchen, indem es mit der Hand über die glatten Federn hinstrich, und die bunte Kuh kraute es zwischen den Hörnern. Und als es auf Geheiß des Alten eine gute Suppe bereitet hatte und die Schüssel auf dem Tisch stand, so sprach es: "Soll ich mich sättigen, und die guten Tiere sollen nichts haben? Draußen ist die Hülle und Fülle, erst will ich für sie sorgen." Da ging es, holte Gerste und streute sie dem Hühnchen und Hähnchen vor und brachte der Kuh wohlriechendes Heu, einen ganzen Arm voll. "Laßt's euch schmecken, ihr lieben Tiere," sagte es, "und wenn ihr durstig seid, sollt ihr auch einen frischen Trunk haben." Dann trug es einen Eimer voll Wasser herein, und Hühnchen und Hähnchen sprangen auf den Rand, steckten den Schnabel hinein und hielten den Kopf dann in die Höhe, wie die Vögel trinken, und die bunte Kuh tat auch einen herzhaften Zug. Als die Tiere gefüttert waren, setzte sich das Mädchen zu dem Alten an den Tisch und aß, was er ihm übriggelassen hatte. Nicht lange, so fing das Hühnchen und Hähnchen an, das Köpfchen zwischen die Flügel zu stecken, und die bunte Kuh blinzelte mit den Augen. Da sprach das Mädchen: "Sollen wir uns nicht zur Ruhe begeben?"

"Schön Hühnchen,
Schön Hähnchen
Und du schöne, bunte Kuh,
Was sagst du dazu?"

Die Tiere antworteten: "Duks,

Du hast mit uns gegessen,
Du hast mit uns getrunken,
Du hast uns alle wohlbedacht,
Wir wünschen dir eine gute Nacht."

Da ging das Mädchen die Treppe hinauf, schüttelte die Federkissen und deckte frisches Linnen auf, und als es fertig war, kam der Alte und legte sich in das eine Bett, und sein weißer Bart reichte ihm bis an die Füße. Das Mädchen legte sich in das andere, tat sein Gebet und schlief ein.Es schlief ruhig bis Mitternacht, da ward es so unruhig in dem Hause, daß das Mädchen erwachte. Da fing es an, in den Ecken zu knittern und zu knattern, und die Türe sprang auf und schlug an die Wand; die Balken dröhnten, als wenn sie aus ihren Fugen gerissen würden, und es war, als wenn die Treppe herabstürzte, und endlich krachte es, als wenn das ganze Dach zusammenfiele. Da es aber wieder still ward und dem Mädchen nichts zuleid geschah, so blieb es ruhig liegen und schlief wieder ein.Als es aber am Morgen bei hellem Sonnenschein aufwachte, was erblickten seine Augen? Es lag in einem großen Saal, und ringsumher glänzte alles in königlicher Pracht: An den Wänden wuchsen auf grünseidenem Grund goldene Blumen in die Höhe, das Bett war von Elfenbein und die Decke darauf von rotem Samt, und auf einem Stuhl daneben stand ein Paar mit Perlen gestickte Pantoffeln.Das Mädchen glaubte, es wäre ein Traum, aber es traten drei reichgekleidete Diener herein und fragten, was es zu befehlen hätte. "Geht nur," antwortete das Mädchen, "ich will gleich aufstehen und dem Alten eine Suppe kochen und dann auch schön Hühnchen, schön Hähnchen und die schöne bunte Kuh füttern." Es dachte, der Alte wäre schon aufgestanden, und sah sich nach seinem Bette um, aber er lag nicht darin, sondern ein fremder Mann. Und als es ihn betrachtete und sah, daß er jung und schön war, erwachte er, richtete sich auf und sprach: "Ich bin ein Königssohn und war von einer bösen Hexe verwünscht worden, als ein alter, eisgrauer Mann in dem Wald zu leben, niemand durfte um mich sein als meine drei Diener in der Gestalt eines Hühnchens, eines Hähnchens und einer bunten Kuh. Und nicht eher sollte die Verwünschung aufhören, als bis ein Mädchen zu uns käme, so gut von Herzen, daß es nicht nur gegen die Menschen allein, sondern auch gegen die Tiere sich liebreich bezeigte, und das bist du gewesen, und heute um Mitternacht sind wir durch dich erlöst und das alte Waldhaus ist wieder in meinen königlichen Palast verwandelt worden." Und als sie aufgestanden waren, sagte der Königssohn den drei Dienern, sie sollten hinausfahren und Vater und Mutter des Mädchens zur Hochzeit herbeiholen. "Aber wo sind meine zei Schwestern?" fragte das Mädchen. "Die habe ich in den Keller gesperrt, und morgen sollen sie in den Wald geführt werden und sollen be; dem Köhler so lange als Mägde dienen, bis sie sich gebessert haben und auch die armen Tiere nicht hungern lassen."




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.