ENGLISH

The hut in the forest

日本語

森の家


A poor wood-cutter lived with his wife and three daughters in a little hut on the edge of a lonely forest. One morning as he was about to go to his work, he said to his wife, "Let my dinner be brought into the forest to me by my eldest daughter, or I shall never get my work done, and in order that she may not miss her way," he added, "I will take a bag of millet with me and strew the seeds on the path." When, therefore, the sun was just above the center of the forest, the girl set out on her way with a bowl of soup, but the field-sparrows, and wood-sparrows, larks and finches, blackbirds and siskins had picked up the millet long before, and the girl could not find the track. Then trusting to chance, she went on and on, until the sun sank and night began to fall. The trees rustled in the darkness, the owls hooted, and she began to be afraid. Then in the distance she perceived a light which glimmered between the trees. "There ought to be some people living there, who can take me in for the night," thought she, and went up to the light. It was not long before she came to a house the windows of which were all lighted up. She knocked, and a rough voice from inside cried, "Come in." The girl stepped into the dark entrance, and knocked at the door of the room. "Just come in," cried the voice, and when she opened the door, an old gray-haired man was sitting at the table, supporting his face with both hands, and his white beard fell down over the table almost as far as the ground. By the stove lay three animals, a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. The girl told her story to the old man, and begged for shelter for the night. The man said,
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," answered the animals, and that must have meant, "We are willing," for the old man said, "Here you shall have shelter and food, go to the fire, and cook us our supper." The girl found in the kitchen abundance of everything, and cooked a good supper, but had no thought of the animals. She carried the full dishes to the table, seated herself by the gray-haired man, ate and satisfied her hunger. When she had had enough, she said, "But now I am tired, where is there a bed in which I can lie down, and sleep?" The animals replied,
"Thou hast eaten with him,
Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
So find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
Then said the old man, "Just go upstairs, and thou wilt find a room with two beds, shake them up, and put white linen on them, and then I, too, will come and lie down to sleep." The girl went up, and when she had shaken the beds and put clean sheets on, she lay down in one of them without waiting any longer for the old man. After some time, however, the gray-haired man came, took his candle, looked at the girl and shook his head. When he saw that she had fallen into a sound sleep, he opened a trap-door, and let her down into the cellar.
Late at night the wood-cutter came home, and reproached his wife for leaving him to hunger all day. "It is not my fault," she replied, "the girl went out with your dinner, and must have lost herself, but she is sure to come back to-morrow." The wood-cutter, however, arose before dawn to go into the forest, and requested that the second daughter should take him his dinner that day. "I will take a bag with lentils," said he; "the seeds are larger than millet, the girl will see them better, and can't lose her way." At dinner-time, therefore, the girl took out the food, but the lentils had disappeared. The birds of the forest had picked them up as they had done the day before, and had left none. The girl wandered about in the forest until night, and then she too reached the house of the old man, was told to go in, and begged for food and a bed. The man with the white beard again asked the animals,


"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals again replied "Duks," and everything happened just as it had happened the day before. The girl cooked a good meal, ate and drank with the old man, and did not concern herself about the animals, and when she inquired about her bed they answered,

"Thou hast eaten with him, Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
To find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
When she was asleep the old man came, looked at her, shook his head, and let her down into the cellar.
On the third morning the wood-cutter said to his wife, "Send our youngest child out with my dinner to-day, she has always been good and obedient, and will stay in the right path, and not run about after every wild humble-bee, as her sisters did." The mother did not want to do it, and said, "Am I to lose my dearest child, as well?"

"Have no fear,' he replied, "the girl will not go astray; she is too prudent and sensible; besides I will take some peas with me, and strew them about. They are still larger than lentils, and will show her the way." But when the girl went out with her basket on her arm, the wood-pigeons had already got all the peas in their crops, and she did not know which way she was to turn. She was full of sorrow and never ceased to think how hungry her father would be, and how her good mother would grieve, if she did not go home. At length when it grew dark, she saw the light and came to the house in the forest. She begged quite prettily to be allowed to spend the night there, and the man with the white beard once more asked his animals,

"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And beautiful brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," said they. Then the girl went to the stove where the animals were lying, and petted the cock and hen, and stroked their smooth feathers with her hand, and caressed the brindled cow between her horns, and when, in obedience to the old man's orders, she had made ready some good soup, and the bowl was placed upon the table, she said, "Am I to eat as much as I want, and the good animals to have nothing? Outside is food in plenty, I will look after them first." So she went and brought some barley and stewed it for the cock and hen, and a whole armful of sweet- smelling hay for the cow. "I hope you will like it, dear animals," said she, "and you shall have a refreshing draught in case you are thirsty." Then she fetched in a bucketful of water, and the cock and hen jumped on to the edge of it and dipped their beaks in, and then held up their heads as the birds do when they drink, and the brindled cow also took a hearty draught. When the animals were fed, the girl seated herself at the table by the old man, and ate what he had left. It was not long before the cock and the hen began to thrust their heads beneath their wings, and the eyes of the cow likewise began to blink. Then said the girl, "Ought we not to go to bed?"
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals answered "Duks,"
"Thou hast eaten with us,
Thou hast drunk with us,
Thou hast had kind thought for all of us,
We wish thee good-night."
Then the maiden went upstairs, shook the feather-beds, and laid clean sheets on them, and when she had done it the old man came and lay down on one of the beds, and his white beard reached down to his feet. The girl lay down on the other, said her prayers, and fell asleep.
She slept quietly till midnight, and then there was such a noise in the house that she awoke. There was a sound of cracking and splitting in every corner, and the doors sprang open, and beat against the walls. The beams groaned as if they were being torn out of their joints, it seemed as if the staircase were falling down, and at length there was a crash as if the entire roof had fallen in. As, however, all grew quiet once more, and the girl was not hurt, she stayed quietly lying where she was, and fell asleep again. But when she woke up in the morning with the brilliancy of the sunshine, what did her eyes behold? She was lying in a vast hall, and everything around her shone with royal splendor; on the walls, golden flowers grew up on a ground of green silk, the bed was of ivory, and the canopy of red velvet, and on a chair close by, was a pair of shoes embroidered with pearls. The girl believed that she was in a dream, but three richly clad attendants came in, and asked what orders she would like to give? "If you will go," she replied, "I will get up at once and make ready some soup for the old man, and then I will feed the pretty little hen, and the cock, and the beautiful brindled cow." She thought the old man was up already, and looked round at his bed; he, however, was not lying in it, but a stranger. And while she was looking at him, and becoming aware that he was young and handsome, he awoke, sat up in bed, and said, "I am a King's son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals - and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace." And when they had arisen, the King's son ordered the three attendants to set out and fetch the father and mother of the girl to the marriage feast. "But where are my two sisters?" inquired the maiden. "I have locked them in the cellar, and to-morrow they shall be led into the forest, and shall live as servants to a charcoal-burner, until they have grown kinder, and do not leave poor animals to suffer hunger."
さびしいもりのはずれの小さな小屋に、貧しい木こりが妻と3人の娘と一緒に住んでいました。ある朝、木こりは仕事に出かけようとしている時、妻に「上の娘に森に弁当を持たせてよこしてくれ。そうしないと、仕事が終わらないからね。」と言い、「道に迷わないようにキビを一袋持って行って道にまいておくよ。」と付け加えました。それで、太陽が森のちょうど中央にあるとき、娘はスープのどんぶりをもって出かけて行きました。しかし、野のすずめ、森のすずめ、ひばりやアトリ、つぐみやマヒワがずっとまえにキビをついばんでしまっていて、娘はお父さんの通った道を見つけられませんでした。適当に見込みをつけて娘はどんどん行きましたが、太陽が沈み夜になり始めました。暗闇で木々がガサガサ鳴ってフクロウが啼き、娘は怖くなりました。

すると、遠くに木々の間にチラチラ光る明かりが見えました。娘は、「あそこに人が住んでいるはずよ。一晩泊めてくれるわ。」と思い、明かりに近づいて行きました。ほどなくして娘は窓が全部明るくなっている家に着きました。娘がノックすると、中からガラガラ声が「お入り」と叫びました。娘は暗い入口に入り、部屋の戸をノックしました。「お入りよ」と声が叫び、戸を開けると、白髪頭のおじいさんがテーブルの前に座って、顔を両手で支え、白いあごひげがテーブルの上から床に届くほど垂れ下がっていました。ストーブのそばには3匹の動物、めんどりとおんどりとぶちの雌牛がいました。娘はおじいさんに事情を話して一晩の宿をお願いしました。

男は「かわいいめんどり、かわいいおんどり、かわいいぶちの雌牛、お前たちの意見はどうだ?」と言いました。「ドゥクス」と動物たちは答えました。それは「賛成だ」という意味だったにちがいありません。というのはおじいさんは、「ここに宿も食べ物もあるよ。かまどへ行ってわたしたちに夕食を作っておくれ。」と言ったからです。娘は台所に何でもたくさんあったので、おいしい夕食を作りましたが、動物たちのことは何も考えませんでした。どんぶりにいっぱいテーブルに運び、白髪のおじいさんのそばに座り、満腹になるまで食べました。十分食べ終わると、「だけどもう疲れたわ。私が横になって眠るベッドはどこにあるの?」と言いました。動物たちは「お前は爺さんと食べた、お前は爺さんと飲んだ、お前は私たちの事は何も考えなかった、だから、夜泊るところを自分で探せ」と答えました。するとおじいさんが、「二階へ行きなさい。そうすれば2つベッドのある部屋がみつかるよ。布団をよく振って、白いリンネルをかけなさい。それから私も行って寝るからね。」と言いました。娘は上へ行き、布団を振って、きれいなシーツをかけると、もうおじいさんを待たないでベッドの一つに寝ました。

しばらくして白髪のおじいさんが来て、娘の上にろうそくをかざして頭を振りました。娘がぐっすり眠っているのがわかると、落とし穴の戸を開け、娘を地下室に落としてしまいました。

夜遅く、木こりは家へ帰り、一日中、空腹のままにさせられたと妻を責めました。「私のせいではないよ。娘は弁当を持って出かけ、道に迷ったに違いないわ。だけど明日はきっと帰ってくるでしょう。」と妻は答えました。しかし木こりは森へ行くのに夜明け前に起き、その日は二番目の娘が弁当をもってくるようにと頼み、「レンズ豆の袋を持っていくよ、種がキビより大きいから娘は前より良く見えて道に迷わないよ。」と言いました。それで、昼食時に、娘は食べ物を持って行きましたが、レンズ豆は消えてしまっていました。森の鳥たちが前の日と同じようについばんで食べてしまって、何も残さなかったのです。

娘は森の中を夜までさ迷い、またおじいさんの家にたどりつき、入るように言われ、食べ物とベッドを頼みました。白いひげのおじいさんはまた動物たちに、「かわいいめんどり、かわいいおんどり、かわいいぶちの雌牛、お前たちの意見はどうだ?」と尋ねました。動物たちは再び「ドゥクス」と答え、まるで昨日とおなじに万事がすすみました。娘はおいしい食事を作り、おじいさんと飲んで食べ、動物たちのことは無関心でした。娘がベッドのことを聞くと、動物たちは「お前は爺さんと食べた、お前は爺さんと飲んだ、お前は私たちの事は何も考えなかった、だから、夜泊るところを自分で探せ」と答えました。娘が眠っているときおじいさんがきて、娘を見て、頭を振り、地下室に落としました。

3日目の朝に木こりは妻に、「今日は3番目の子供に弁当をもたせてよこしてくれ。あの子はいつもいい子で素直だから、ちゃんとした道をくるさ。ブンブン蜂の姉たちのようにあちこちうろうろしないだろよ。」と言いました。母親はそうしたくなくて、「一番かわいい子も失くすのかい?」と言いました。「心配するな。あの子は迷わないよ。とても慎重だし分別があるからね。それにエンドウ豆を持って行き,まくよ。レンズ豆よりもずっと大きいから、道がわかりやすいだろ。」と木こりは答えました。しかし、娘が腕にかごをさげてでかけると、森の鳩がもうエンドウ豆を食べてしまっていました。それで娘はどっちへいけばいいのかわかりませんでした。悲しさでいっぱいで、おとうさんはどんなにおなかがすいてるだろう、もし自分が家へ帰らなければやさしいおかあさんはどんなに悲しむだろうとずっと考えていました。

暗くなったときとうとう、明かりが見えて、森の家へ着きました。娘はとても行儀よく一晩泊めていただけないでしょうかとお願いしました。そして白いひげのおじいさんは再び動物たちに「かわいいめんどり、かわいいおんどり、かわいいぶちの雌牛、今度はお前たちの意見はどうだ?」と尋ねました。「ドゥクス」と動物たちは言いました。すると、娘は動物たちがいるストーブのところに行き、手でおんどりとめんどりの滑らかな羽をなでてかわいがり、ぶちの牛の角の間を触ってなでました。おじいさんの命令に従って、おいしいスープを用意し、ドンブリをテーブルに置いたとき、「私が好きなだけ食べて、かわいい動物たちが何もなくていいの?外にはたくさん食べ物があるわ。先に動物たちの世話をしましょう。」と言いました。それで出て行って、大麦をもってくると、おんどりとめんどりにあげ、そして雌牛には甘いかおりのする干し草をあげました。「気にいるといいんだけど、可愛い動物さん、それから喉がかわいていたら、さっぱりした飲み物をあげるわね。」と言いました。それから桶いっぱいの水を汲むと、おんどりとめんどりは桶のふちに跳びあがってくちばしを突っ込み、鳥が飲むときするように頭を持ち上げました。ぶちの雌牛も心ゆくまでグーッと飲みました。

動物たちが食べると、娘は食卓のおじいさんのそばに座り、おじいさんが残したものを食べました。まもなくおんどりとめんどりが翼の下に頭を入れ始め、雌牛の目も同じようにしょぼしょぼし始めました。それで娘は「もう寝た方がいいのじゃないの?かわいいめんどり、かわいいおんどり、かわいいぶちの雌牛、お前たちの意見はどう?」と言いました。「ドゥクス、お前は私たちと一緒に食べた、お前は私たちと一緒に飲んだ、おまえには私たちみんなにやさしい思いやりがあった、おやすみなさい」と動物たちは言いました。それで娘は二階に行き、羽の布団を振り、きれいなシーツをかけると、終わったころにおじいさんが来てベッドの一つに寝て、白いひげが足まで伸びて垂れました。娘はもう一つのベッドに寝て、お祈りをし、眠りました。

娘は真夜中まで静かに眠りました。すると家の中がとても騒がしいので目が覚めました。どのすみでもピシピシ、ガタガタ割れるような音がして、戸がぱっと開き、壁にガツンとぶつかりました。はりが継ぎ目からやぶれているかのように唸りました。階段は崩れ落ちているかのようでした。そしてとうとう屋根全体が落ちてくるかのようにガラガラという音がしました。しかし、ふたたび全く静かになり、娘は怪我しなかったので、そのまま静かに寝ていたら、また眠ってしまいました。

しかし太陽のまばゆさで朝目が覚めると、娘の目には何が見えたことでしょう。娘は大広間に寝ていて、まわりの物はすべて王宮の豪華さで輝いていました。壁には、金の花が緑の絹の地に育っていて、ベッドは象牙でできており、天蓋は赤いびろうどでできていました。近くの椅子には真珠で刺しゅうされた室内履きがありました。娘は自分が夢の中にいるにちがいないと思いましたが、3人のりっぱな服の従者が入ってきて、「なにかご用がございませんか?」と尋ねました。「皆さんが行ったら、すぐに起きて、おじいさんにスープを用意します。それからかわいいめんどりとかわいいおんどりとかわいいぶちの雌牛にえさをやるわ。」と娘は答えました。

娘は、おじいさんはもう起きているのだと思い、振り向いておじいさんのベッドをみました。ところが、そこにねていたのはおじいさんではなく、見知らぬ人でした。娘がその人を見ていて、若くてハンサムな人だとわかってきたとき、その男の人は目を覚まし、ベッドに起きあがって、「私は王様の息子なのです。悪い魔女に魔法をかけられ、この森で白髪の老人として住まわされました。おんどりとめんどりとぶちの雌牛の形の3人の従者しか一緒にいることが許されませんでした。心がとてもよくて、人間だけでなく動物にもいっぱい愛を示す娘が来るまでは魔法はとかれなかったのです。それをあなたがしてくれました。あなたのおかげで真夜中に私たちは解放され、森の中の古い小屋はまた王宮に戻りました。」と言いました。二人が起きた後、王様の息子は3人の従者にでかけて結婚式に娘の父と母を連れてくるようにと命じました。「だけど、私の二人の姉たちはどこにいるの?」と娘は尋ねました。「二人を地下室に閉じ込めておきました。明日、森に連れて行き、もっとやさしくなって、可哀そうな動物たちを空腹にさせなくなるまで、炭焼きの召使として暮らさせます。」




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.