ENGLISH

The hut in the forest

NEDERLANDS

Het boshuis


A poor wood-cutter lived with his wife and three daughters in a little hut on the edge of a lonely forest. One morning as he was about to go to his work, he said to his wife, "Let my dinner be brought into the forest to me by my eldest daughter, or I shall never get my work done, and in order that she may not miss her way," he added, "I will take a bag of millet with me and strew the seeds on the path." When, therefore, the sun was just above the center of the forest, the girl set out on her way with a bowl of soup, but the field-sparrows, and wood-sparrows, larks and finches, blackbirds and siskins had picked up the millet long before, and the girl could not find the track. Then trusting to chance, she went on and on, until the sun sank and night began to fall. The trees rustled in the darkness, the owls hooted, and she began to be afraid. Then in the distance she perceived a light which glimmered between the trees. "There ought to be some people living there, who can take me in for the night," thought she, and went up to the light. It was not long before she came to a house the windows of which were all lighted up. She knocked, and a rough voice from inside cried, "Come in." The girl stepped into the dark entrance, and knocked at the door of the room. "Just come in," cried the voice, and when she opened the door, an old gray-haired man was sitting at the table, supporting his face with both hands, and his white beard fell down over the table almost as far as the ground. By the stove lay three animals, a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. The girl told her story to the old man, and begged for shelter for the night. The man said,
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," answered the animals, and that must have meant, "We are willing," for the old man said, "Here you shall have shelter and food, go to the fire, and cook us our supper." The girl found in the kitchen abundance of everything, and cooked a good supper, but had no thought of the animals. She carried the full dishes to the table, seated herself by the gray-haired man, ate and satisfied her hunger. When she had had enough, she said, "But now I am tired, where is there a bed in which I can lie down, and sleep?" The animals replied,
"Thou hast eaten with him,
Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
So find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
Then said the old man, "Just go upstairs, and thou wilt find a room with two beds, shake them up, and put white linen on them, and then I, too, will come and lie down to sleep." The girl went up, and when she had shaken the beds and put clean sheets on, she lay down in one of them without waiting any longer for the old man. After some time, however, the gray-haired man came, took his candle, looked at the girl and shook his head. When he saw that she had fallen into a sound sleep, he opened a trap-door, and let her down into the cellar.
Late at night the wood-cutter came home, and reproached his wife for leaving him to hunger all day. "It is not my fault," she replied, "the girl went out with your dinner, and must have lost herself, but she is sure to come back to-morrow." The wood-cutter, however, arose before dawn to go into the forest, and requested that the second daughter should take him his dinner that day. "I will take a bag with lentils," said he; "the seeds are larger than millet, the girl will see them better, and can't lose her way." At dinner-time, therefore, the girl took out the food, but the lentils had disappeared. The birds of the forest had picked them up as they had done the day before, and had left none. The girl wandered about in the forest until night, and then she too reached the house of the old man, was told to go in, and begged for food and a bed. The man with the white beard again asked the animals,


"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals again replied "Duks," and everything happened just as it had happened the day before. The girl cooked a good meal, ate and drank with the old man, and did not concern herself about the animals, and when she inquired about her bed they answered,

"Thou hast eaten with him, Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
To find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
When she was asleep the old man came, looked at her, shook his head, and let her down into the cellar.
On the third morning the wood-cutter said to his wife, "Send our youngest child out with my dinner to-day, she has always been good and obedient, and will stay in the right path, and not run about after every wild humble-bee, as her sisters did." The mother did not want to do it, and said, "Am I to lose my dearest child, as well?"

"Have no fear,' he replied, "the girl will not go astray; she is too prudent and sensible; besides I will take some peas with me, and strew them about. They are still larger than lentils, and will show her the way." But when the girl went out with her basket on her arm, the wood-pigeons had already got all the peas in their crops, and she did not know which way she was to turn. She was full of sorrow and never ceased to think how hungry her father would be, and how her good mother would grieve, if she did not go home. At length when it grew dark, she saw the light and came to the house in the forest. She begged quite prettily to be allowed to spend the night there, and the man with the white beard once more asked his animals,

"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And beautiful brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," said they. Then the girl went to the stove where the animals were lying, and petted the cock and hen, and stroked their smooth feathers with her hand, and caressed the brindled cow between her horns, and when, in obedience to the old man's orders, she had made ready some good soup, and the bowl was placed upon the table, she said, "Am I to eat as much as I want, and the good animals to have nothing? Outside is food in plenty, I will look after them first." So she went and brought some barley and stewed it for the cock and hen, and a whole armful of sweet- smelling hay for the cow. "I hope you will like it, dear animals," said she, "and you shall have a refreshing draught in case you are thirsty." Then she fetched in a bucketful of water, and the cock and hen jumped on to the edge of it and dipped their beaks in, and then held up their heads as the birds do when they drink, and the brindled cow also took a hearty draught. When the animals were fed, the girl seated herself at the table by the old man, and ate what he had left. It was not long before the cock and the hen began to thrust their heads beneath their wings, and the eyes of the cow likewise began to blink. Then said the girl, "Ought we not to go to bed?"
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals answered "Duks,"
"Thou hast eaten with us,
Thou hast drunk with us,
Thou hast had kind thought for all of us,
We wish thee good-night."
Then the maiden went upstairs, shook the feather-beds, and laid clean sheets on them, and when she had done it the old man came and lay down on one of the beds, and his white beard reached down to his feet. The girl lay down on the other, said her prayers, and fell asleep.
She slept quietly till midnight, and then there was such a noise in the house that she awoke. There was a sound of cracking and splitting in every corner, and the doors sprang open, and beat against the walls. The beams groaned as if they were being torn out of their joints, it seemed as if the staircase were falling down, and at length there was a crash as if the entire roof had fallen in. As, however, all grew quiet once more, and the girl was not hurt, she stayed quietly lying where she was, and fell asleep again. But when she woke up in the morning with the brilliancy of the sunshine, what did her eyes behold? She was lying in a vast hall, and everything around her shone with royal splendor; on the walls, golden flowers grew up on a ground of green silk, the bed was of ivory, and the canopy of red velvet, and on a chair close by, was a pair of shoes embroidered with pearls. The girl believed that she was in a dream, but three richly clad attendants came in, and asked what orders she would like to give? "If you will go," she replied, "I will get up at once and make ready some soup for the old man, and then I will feed the pretty little hen, and the cock, and the beautiful brindled cow." She thought the old man was up already, and looked round at his bed; he, however, was not lying in it, but a stranger. And while she was looking at him, and becoming aware that he was young and handsome, he awoke, sat up in bed, and said, "I am a King's son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals - and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace." And when they had arisen, the King's son ordered the three attendants to set out and fetch the father and mother of the girl to the marriage feast. "But where are my two sisters?" inquired the maiden. "I have locked them in the cellar, and to-morrow they shall be led into the forest, and shall live as servants to a charcoal-burner, until they have grown kinder, and do not leave poor animals to suffer hunger."
Een arme houthakker leefde eens met zijn vrouw en zijn drie dochters in een klein huisje aan de rand van een eenzaam bos. Eens op een morgen, toen hij weer naar zijn werk ging, zei hij tegen zijn vrouw: "Laat me het middageten door 't oudste meisje brengen, buiten in het bos; anders kom ik niet klaar. En om haar niet te laten verdwalen," voegde hij erbij, "zal ik een zak gerst meenemen en de korrels op de weg strooien." Toen de zon hoog boven 't bos stond, ging 't meisje met een pan vol soep op weg. Maar de mussen van veld en bos, de leeuweriken en de vinken, de sijsjes en de merels hadden die gerst al lang opgepikt, en 't meisje kon de weg niet vinden. Op goed geluk liep ze maar door, tot de zon zonk en de nacht aanbrak. De bomen ruisten in de duisternis, de uilen krasten, en ze begon bang te worden. Daar zag ze in de verte een lichtje, dat tussen de bomen blonk. "Daar zullen wel mensen wonen," dacht ze, "die mij vannacht wel zullen houden" en ze ging op het licht af. Het duurde niet lang of ze kwam bij een huis waarvan de vensters verlicht waren. Ze klopte aan, en een rauwe stem riep "Binnen!" Het meisje kwam de donkere deel binnen en klopte op de kamerdeur. "Hier, binnen!" riep de stem, en toen ze opendeed, zat er een oude, grijze man aan tafel, z'n gezicht in z'n handen gesteund en z'n witte baard kwam van de tafel naar beneden, bijna tot op de grond. Maar bij de haard lagen drie dieren, een hennetje, een haantje, en een bonte koe. Het meisje vertelde de oude man wat er gebeurd was en ze vroeg of ze daar die nacht mocht slapen. De man zei:

"Mooi hennetje,
mooi haantje,
en jij, die mooie bonte koe,
wat zeg je hiertoe?"

"Doeks!" zeiden de dieren, en dat moest zeker betekenen "wij zijn 't daarmee eens," want nu zei de oude weer: "Hier is overvloed van alles. Ga maar naar de haard en kook een avondmaal voor ons." Het meisje vond in de keuken overvloed van alles, en ze kookte lekker, maar aan de dieren dacht ze niet. Ze zette de volle schotel op tafel, ging bij de oude man zitten, at en werd verzadigd. Toen ze genoeg had gegeten, zei ze: "Maar nu ben ik zo moe, is hier ook een bed, waar ik kan gaan slapen?" De dieren antwoordden:

"Je hebt met hem gegeten
je hebt met hem gedronken,
je hebt aan ons niet eens gedacht:
zie jij maar, waar je blijft vannacht!"

Toen zei de oude man: "Ga de trap maar op, dan zul je een kamer vinden met twee bedden. Schud ze goed en maak ze orj met linnen lakens. Dan zal ik ook komen en gaan slapen." Het meisje ging de trap op, en toen ze de bedden geschud had en had opgemaakt, ging ze in 't ene liggen en sliep zonder de oude man af te wachten. Maar na een poos kwam de grijze man, hij keek bij het schijnsel van een licht naar 't meisje, terwijl hij zijn hoofd schudde. Toen hij zag dat ze vast in slaap was, opende hij een valdeur en liet haar neer in de kelder. Laat in de avond kwam de houthakker thuis en verweet zijn vrouw, dat ze hem de hele dag honger had laten lijden. "Dat is mijn schuld niet," antwoordde zij, "'t kind is weggegaan met je middageten, ze is zeker verdwaald, morgen zal ze er wel weer zijn." De houthakker stond voor dag en dauw op, wilde weer naar het bos en zei dat z'n tweede dochter hem ditmaal het eten moest brengen. "Ik zal een zak linzen meenemen," zei hij, "dat is een grotere korrel dan gerst, die zal ze beter kunnen zien en dan kan ze de weg niet missen." 's Middags ging dit meisje ook met 't eten weg, maar de linzen waren er niet meer; net als de vorige dag hadden de bosvogels ze opgepikt en er geeneen meer overgelaten. Het meisje verdwaalde in het bos tot de nacht viel, en ook zij kwam bij 't huis van de oude man, werd binnen geroepen en vroeg om eten en een slaapplaats. De man met de witte baard vroeg weer aan de dieren:

"Mooi hennetje
mooi haantje
en jij, die mooie bonte koe,
wat zeg je hiertoe?"

En de dieren zeiden weer: "Doeks" en alles gebeurde als de vorige dag. Het meisje maakte een goed maal klaar, at en dronk met de oude man en dacht niet aan de dieren. En toen ze vroeg om een slaapplaats, antwoordden ze:

"Je hebt met hem gegeten,
je hebt met hem gedronken,
je hebt aan ons niet eens gedacht,
zie jij maar, waar je blijft vannacht!"

En toen ze ingeslapen was, kwam de oude man, bekeek haar hoofdschuddend en liet haar in de kelder zakken.
De derde morgen zei de houthakker tegen zijn vrouw: "Stuur vandaag de jongste maar met mijn middageten naar me toe, zij is altijd verstandig en gehoorzaam geweest, zij zal wel op de goede weg blijven en niet als de zusjes maar rondlopen en teuten." Dat wilde de moeder niet. Ze zei: "Moet ik mijn lieve jongste dan ook nog verliezen?" - "Heb maar geen zorg," zei hij, "dat kind verdwaalt niet; daar is ze te verstandig voor en te slim, ten overvloede zal ik een zak erwten meenemen en die uitstrooien langs de weg; ze zijn nog groter dan linzen en dan zal ze het zeker vinden." Maar toen het meisje met de mand aan haar arm buiten kwam, hadden de houtduiven de erwten al lang in hun krop, en ze wist ook niet waar ze zich keren of wenden moest. Ze was heel verdrietig en dacht er voortdurend aan, hoe die arme vader weer honger zou lijden en die goede moeder zou jammeren, als ze ook niet thuis kwam. Eindelijk, toen het donker werd, zag ze in de verte het lichtje en ze kwam bij het boshuis. Ze vroeg heel vriendelijk of zij haar die nacht wilden herbergen, en de man met de witte baard vroeg weer aan de dieren:

"Mooi hennetje,
mooi haantje,
en jij, die mooie bonte koe,
wat zeg je daar toe?"

"Doeks" zeiden ze. Het meisje ging naar de haard waar de dieren lagen, ze streelde het hennetje en het haantje, en streek hun veren glad; en de bonte koe krieuwelde ze tussen z n horens En toen ze op bevel van de oude man een lekkere soep had gekookt en de kom op tafel stond, zei ze: "Nu krijg ik wat, maar hoe gaat het met 't eten van de dieren? Buiten is er overvloed, ik zal hun eerst wat geven." Ze ging weer weg, haalde gerst en gooide een handvol voor het haantje en het hennetje en bracht een armvol geurig hooi voor de koe. "Eet maar lekker," zei ze, "en als jullie dorst hebben, dan krijg je drinken ook." En ze haalde een emmer water, en 't hennetje en 't haantje sprongen op de rand, staken hun snavels erin en hielden hun koppetjes dan omhoog zoals vogels drinken, en de bonte koe nam een flinke slobber. Toen de dieren gevoerd waren, ging het meisje aan tafel zitten bij de oude man en at wat hij had overgelaten. Kort daarop staken het haantje en het hennetje 't kopje onder de vleugels, en de bonte koe begon ook met z'n ogen te knipperen. Toen zei het meisje: "Gaan we nu niet slapen?"

"Mooi hennetje,
mooi haantje,
en jij, die mooie bonte koe
wat zeg je daartoe?"

En de dieren zeiden:

"Doeks,
je hebt met ons gegeten,
je hebt met ons gedronken,
je hebt ons allen goed bedacht,
nu wensen wij je: goedenacht!"

En het meisje ging de trap op, schudde de veren bedden, legde er schone lakens op, en toen ze klaar was, kwam de oude man en hij ging in het ene bed liggen en z'n witte baard kwam tot zijn voeten. Het meisje ging in het andere bed liggen, deed haar gebed en sliep in. Ze sliep heel rustig tot middernacht. Toen werd het in huis zo onrustig dat ze wakker werd. In alle hoeken was er een gekraak en gekreun, en de deur sprong open en sloeg tegen de wand; de balken dreunden als werden ze uit hun voegen gerukt, het leek wel of de trap viel, en toen kwam er een oorverdovend gekraak alsof het dak instortte. Maar toen werd het weer stil en daar haar tenslotte niets kwaads gebeurde, bleef ze kalm liggen en sliep weer in. Maar toen ze de volgende morgen bij stralende zonneschijn wakker werd: wat zagen haar ogen? Ze lag in een grote zaal. Alles om haar heen glansde in koninklijke pracht: aan de wanden groeiden op groen zijden grond gouden bloemen, het bed was van ivoor, het dek van rood fluweel, en daarnaast stond een stoel met een paar pantoffeltjes met parels bewerkt. Het meisje dacht, dat ze droomde, maar nu kwamen er drie rijkgeklede lakeien binnen en vroegen naar haar bevelen. "Ga maar," zei het meisje, "ik zal dadelijk opstaan en me aankleden en voor de oude man soep koken en voor mooi haantje en mooi hennetje en de mooie bonte koe voer halen." Ze dacht dat de oude man al was opgestaan, en ze keek al naar zijn bed; maar hij lag er niet in, alleen een geheel vreemde man. En toen ze hem zag en naar hem keek, was hij jong en knap, en hij werd wakker en richtte zich op en zei: "Ik ben een prins, en ik ben door een boze heks betoverd, om als een oud, vergrijsd man in het bos te leven; niemand mocht er bij me zijn dan mijn drie bedienden, en dat in de gedaante van een haantje, een hennetje en een bonte koe. En de betovering zou niet eerder wijken, dan als er een meisje bij ons kwam, dat zo'n goed hart had, dat ze niet alleen lief was voor de mensen, maar ook voor de dieren. En dat ben jij geweest, en vannacht, om twaalf uur, was de tovermacht gebroken, en het oude boshuis is weer veranderd in mijn eigen paleis." En toen ze opgestaan waren, zei de prins tegen zijn drie dienaren, dat ze moesten inspannen en de vader en de moeder van het meisje op de bruiloft uitnodigen. "Maar waar zijn mijn twee zusters dan?" vroeg het meisje. "Die heb ik in de kelder opgesloten; morgen gaan ze diep het bos in, en dan moeten ze bij een kolenbrander zó lang dienen, tot ze hun leven grondig hebben gebeterd en geen arme dieren meer honger laten lijden."




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.