ENGLISH

The hut in the forest

TÜRKÇE

Orman Evi


A poor wood-cutter lived with his wife and three daughters in a little hut on the edge of a lonely forest. One morning as he was about to go to his work, he said to his wife, "Let my dinner be brought into the forest to me by my eldest daughter, or I shall never get my work done, and in order that she may not miss her way," he added, "I will take a bag of millet with me and strew the seeds on the path." When, therefore, the sun was just above the center of the forest, the girl set out on her way with a bowl of soup, but the field-sparrows, and wood-sparrows, larks and finches, blackbirds and siskins had picked up the millet long before, and the girl could not find the track. Then trusting to chance, she went on and on, until the sun sank and night began to fall. The trees rustled in the darkness, the owls hooted, and she began to be afraid. Then in the distance she perceived a light which glimmered between the trees. "There ought to be some people living there, who can take me in for the night," thought she, and went up to the light. It was not long before she came to a house the windows of which were all lighted up. She knocked, and a rough voice from inside cried, "Come in." The girl stepped into the dark entrance, and knocked at the door of the room. "Just come in," cried the voice, and when she opened the door, an old gray-haired man was sitting at the table, supporting his face with both hands, and his white beard fell down over the table almost as far as the ground. By the stove lay three animals, a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. The girl told her story to the old man, and begged for shelter for the night. The man said,
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," answered the animals, and that must have meant, "We are willing," for the old man said, "Here you shall have shelter and food, go to the fire, and cook us our supper." The girl found in the kitchen abundance of everything, and cooked a good supper, but had no thought of the animals. She carried the full dishes to the table, seated herself by the gray-haired man, ate and satisfied her hunger. When she had had enough, she said, "But now I am tired, where is there a bed in which I can lie down, and sleep?" The animals replied,
"Thou hast eaten with him,
Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
So find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
Then said the old man, "Just go upstairs, and thou wilt find a room with two beds, shake them up, and put white linen on them, and then I, too, will come and lie down to sleep." The girl went up, and when she had shaken the beds and put clean sheets on, she lay down in one of them without waiting any longer for the old man. After some time, however, the gray-haired man came, took his candle, looked at the girl and shook his head. When he saw that she had fallen into a sound sleep, he opened a trap-door, and let her down into the cellar.
Late at night the wood-cutter came home, and reproached his wife for leaving him to hunger all day. "It is not my fault," she replied, "the girl went out with your dinner, and must have lost herself, but she is sure to come back to-morrow." The wood-cutter, however, arose before dawn to go into the forest, and requested that the second daughter should take him his dinner that day. "I will take a bag with lentils," said he; "the seeds are larger than millet, the girl will see them better, and can't lose her way." At dinner-time, therefore, the girl took out the food, but the lentils had disappeared. The birds of the forest had picked them up as they had done the day before, and had left none. The girl wandered about in the forest until night, and then she too reached the house of the old man, was told to go in, and begged for food and a bed. The man with the white beard again asked the animals,


"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals again replied "Duks," and everything happened just as it had happened the day before. The girl cooked a good meal, ate and drank with the old man, and did not concern herself about the animals, and when she inquired about her bed they answered,

"Thou hast eaten with him, Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
To find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
When she was asleep the old man came, looked at her, shook his head, and let her down into the cellar.
On the third morning the wood-cutter said to his wife, "Send our youngest child out with my dinner to-day, she has always been good and obedient, and will stay in the right path, and not run about after every wild humble-bee, as her sisters did." The mother did not want to do it, and said, "Am I to lose my dearest child, as well?"

"Have no fear,' he replied, "the girl will not go astray; she is too prudent and sensible; besides I will take some peas with me, and strew them about. They are still larger than lentils, and will show her the way." But when the girl went out with her basket on her arm, the wood-pigeons had already got all the peas in their crops, and she did not know which way she was to turn. She was full of sorrow and never ceased to think how hungry her father would be, and how her good mother would grieve, if she did not go home. At length when it grew dark, she saw the light and came to the house in the forest. She begged quite prettily to be allowed to spend the night there, and the man with the white beard once more asked his animals,

"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And beautiful brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," said they. Then the girl went to the stove where the animals were lying, and petted the cock and hen, and stroked their smooth feathers with her hand, and caressed the brindled cow between her horns, and when, in obedience to the old man's orders, she had made ready some good soup, and the bowl was placed upon the table, she said, "Am I to eat as much as I want, and the good animals to have nothing? Outside is food in plenty, I will look after them first." So she went and brought some barley and stewed it for the cock and hen, and a whole armful of sweet- smelling hay for the cow. "I hope you will like it, dear animals," said she, "and you shall have a refreshing draught in case you are thirsty." Then she fetched in a bucketful of water, and the cock and hen jumped on to the edge of it and dipped their beaks in, and then held up their heads as the birds do when they drink, and the brindled cow also took a hearty draught. When the animals were fed, the girl seated herself at the table by the old man, and ate what he had left. It was not long before the cock and the hen began to thrust their heads beneath their wings, and the eyes of the cow likewise began to blink. Then said the girl, "Ought we not to go to bed?"
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals answered "Duks,"
"Thou hast eaten with us,
Thou hast drunk with us,
Thou hast had kind thought for all of us,
We wish thee good-night."
Then the maiden went upstairs, shook the feather-beds, and laid clean sheets on them, and when she had done it the old man came and lay down on one of the beds, and his white beard reached down to his feet. The girl lay down on the other, said her prayers, and fell asleep.
She slept quietly till midnight, and then there was such a noise in the house that she awoke. There was a sound of cracking and splitting in every corner, and the doors sprang open, and beat against the walls. The beams groaned as if they were being torn out of their joints, it seemed as if the staircase were falling down, and at length there was a crash as if the entire roof had fallen in. As, however, all grew quiet once more, and the girl was not hurt, she stayed quietly lying where she was, and fell asleep again. But when she woke up in the morning with the brilliancy of the sunshine, what did her eyes behold? She was lying in a vast hall, and everything around her shone with royal splendor; on the walls, golden flowers grew up on a ground of green silk, the bed was of ivory, and the canopy of red velvet, and on a chair close by, was a pair of shoes embroidered with pearls. The girl believed that she was in a dream, but three richly clad attendants came in, and asked what orders she would like to give? "If you will go," she replied, "I will get up at once and make ready some soup for the old man, and then I will feed the pretty little hen, and the cock, and the beautiful brindled cow." She thought the old man was up already, and looked round at his bed; he, however, was not lying in it, but a stranger. And while she was looking at him, and becoming aware that he was young and handsome, he awoke, sat up in bed, and said, "I am a King's son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals - and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace." And when they had arisen, the King's son ordered the three attendants to set out and fetch the father and mother of the girl to the marriage feast. "But where are my two sisters?" inquired the maiden. "I have locked them in the cellar, and to-morrow they shall be led into the forest, and shall live as servants to a charcoal-burner, until they have grown kinder, and do not leave poor animals to suffer hunger."
Issız bir ormanın kenarındaki ufak bir evde karısı ve üç kızıyla birlikte yaşayan bir oduncu vardı. Bir gün işe gitmeden önce karısına, "Öğlen yemeğimi büyük kızla ormana gönder, yoksa işimi bitiremeyeceğim" dedi ve ekledi: "Yolunu şaşırmasın diye yanıma darı alıp geçtiğim yerlere serpeceğim!" Kız, güneş ormanın üzerinde yükselirken bir kâse çorbayla yola çıktı. Ama serçeler, tarla kuşları, ispinozlar, karatavuklar ve isketeler darıların hepsini çoktan yiyip bitirmişti bile; bu yüzden kız babasının izini bulamadı. İşi şansa bırakarak yürüdü gitti.

Derken güneş battı ve akşam oldu. Gecenin karanlığında ağaçlar hışırdamaya başladı, baykuşlar öttü. Kız korkmaya başladı. Uzakta, ağaçlar arasında bir ışık çarptı gözüne. "Orada birileri oturuyor olmalı. Herhalde geceyi orada geçirmeme izin verirler" diye geçirdi aklından. Işığın geldiği eve doğru gidip kapıyı çaldı. "Gir!" diye seslendi içeriden boğuk bir ses. Kız karanlık bir sofaya girdikten sonra iç kapıyı çaldı. "Gir dedik ya!" diye seslendi aynı ses. Kız kapıyı açıp içeri girdiğinde, masa başında oturan çok yaşlı bir adam gördü. Yüzünü ellerine gömmüştü ve ak sakalı masanın üzerinden ta yere kadar sarkmıştı. Sobanın yanında üç tane de hayvan vardı; bir tavuk, bir horoz ve alacalı bir inek. Kız başına gelenleri anlattıktan sonra yaşlı adamdan yatacak bir yer istedi. Adam şöyle sordu:

Güzel tavuğum,
Güzel horozum,
Alacalı ineğim,
Siz ne dersiniz?

"Duks!" diye cevap verdi hayvanlar. Bu olur anlamına geliyordu. "Tamam o zaman, git bize akşam yemeğimizi pişir!" dedi yaşlı adam.
Kız mutfakta her türlü malzemeyi buldu ve güzel bir yemek yaptı, ama hayvanları hiç düşünmedi. Yemek dolu tabakları masaya taşıdı, yaşlı adamın karşısına geçtikten sonra onu doyurdu.
Kendi karnını da doyurduktan sonra, "Ben de yoruldum, yatıp uyuyacağım. Yatak nerede?" diye sordu.
Hayvanlar şu cevabı verdi:

Onunla içtin, onunla yedin
Ama bizi hiç düşünmedin,
Bakalım gece nerede yatacaksın?

"Merdivenden yukarı çık, bir odada iki yatak bulacaksın. Onları havalandır, temiz çarşaf ser; daha sonra ben de gelip yatacağım" dedi yaşlı adam.
Kız merdivenden çıktı, yatakları havalandırdı, temiz çarşaf serdi, ama yaşlı adamı beklemeden kendi yattı.
Az sonra yaşlı adam çıkageldi. Elindeki mumla kızın yüzünü aydınlattı, sonra da başını iki yana salladı. Onun derin uyuduğunu görünce zemindeki bir kapağı açarak kızı mahzene attı.
Akşam olunca oduncu evine döndü ve kendisini bütün gün aç bıraktığı için karısına çattı.
"Kabahat bende değil" dedi kadın, "Ben senin yemeğini kızla gönderdim, yolunu şaşırmış olmalı. Yarın yine gelir."
Ertesi gün oduncu ormana gitmeden önce öğle yemeğini bu kez ortanca kızın getirmesini istedi.
"Yanıma bir torba mercimek alıp yola ekeceğim, taneleri darınınkinden daha büyük çünkü. Kız onları rahatlıkla görür, yolunu da kaybetmez" dedi.
Öğle olunca kız yemeği alıp yola koyuldu. Ama ormandaki kuşlar, tıpkı bir gün önce olduğu gibi, bütün mercimekleri gagalamış ve geriye hiçbir şey bırakmamıştı.
Kız ormanda yolunu şaşırdı ve gece olunca aynı şekilde yaşlı adamın evine vardı. Kapıyı çalarak yiyip içecek ve yatacak bir yer istedi.
Aksakallı adam yine hayvanlara sordu:

Güzel tavuğum,
Güzel horozum,
Alacalı ineğim,
Siz ne dersiniz?

Hayvanlar aynı şekilde "Duks!" dediler. Ve her şey bir gün önceki gibi olup bitti. Kız güzel bir yemek yaptı, yaşlı adamla birlikte yedi içti, hayvanlara hiç bakmadı.
Nerede yatacağını sorduğunda hayvanlar şöyle dedi:

Onunla içtin, onunla yedin,
Ama bizi hiç düşünmedin.
Bakalım gece nerede yatacaksın?

Kız uyuduktan sonra yaşlı adam yine geldi, kafasını sallayarak ona baktı, sonra da onu mahzene attı.
Oduncu üçüncü günün sabahı karısına, "Bana bugünkü yemeğimi her zaman söz dinleyen en küçük kızımla gönder; o ablalarına ya da oraya buraya uçan arılara benzemez, doğru yolu bulacaktır" dedi.
Ama karısı bunu istemedi ve "En sevdiğim kızımı da mı kaybedeyim?" dedi.
"Merak etme" diye cevap verdi adam. "O yolunu kaybetmez; akıllıdır, kafası da çalışır. Ben bu sefer yanıma bezelye alayım, mercimekten daha iridir, kızımıza yolunu daha iyi gösterir."
Ama güvercinler tüm bezelyeleri kursaklarına gönderiverdiler; öyle ki, kız ne tarafa gideceğini bilemedi.
Çok üzüldü. Hep aç kalacak olan zavallı babasıyla meraktan ölecek annesini düşündü. Derken, hava kararınca gözüne bir ışık çarptı ve orman evine geliverdi. Nazik bir şekilde geceyi burada geçirip geçiremeyeceğini sordu. Aksakallı adam yine hayvanlarına danıştı:

Güzel tavuğum,
Güzel horozum,
Alacalı ineğim,
Siz ne dersiniz?

Onlar yine "Duks!" diye cevap verdi.
Kız sobanın yanındaki hayvanlara yaklaştı, tavukla horozun parlak tüylerini sıvazladı, alacalı ineğin iki boynuzu arasında kalan başını okşadı.
Yaşlı adamın emri üzerine güzel bir çorba pişirdi. Çorbayı ve tabakları masaya koyduktan sonra, "Ben yiyeyim de şu güzel hayvanlar aç mı kalsın yani? Dışarıda bol bol yiyecek var nasılsa. Önce onların karnını doyurayım" dedi.
Dışarı çıktı, tavukla horoza yemlerini verdi, alacalı ineğe de bir kucak dolusu taze saman.
"Afiyet olsun, sevgili hayvanlar. Susarsanız diye size su getireyim" deyip bir kova dolusu su taşıdı. Tavukla horoz hemen kovanın kenarına çıktı, gagalarını suya soktu, sonra da kafalarını yukarı kaldırarak kuşların yaptığı gibi su içtiler. Alacalı inek de susuzluğunu iyice giderdi. Hayvanları böyle besledikten sonra kız, yaşlı adamın masasına oturdu ve arta kalan yemeği yedi. Aradan çok geçmeden tavukla horoz, parmaklıklar arasından başlarını uzattı, alacalı inek de göz kırptı. "Artık yatsak nasıl olur?" diye sordu kız. Aksakallı adam yine hayvanlarına danıştı:

Güzel tavuğum,
Güzel horozum,
Alacalı ineğim,
Siz ne dersiniz?

Hayvanlar cevap verdi: "Duks!"

Sen bizimle içtin, bizimle yedin,
Ve de hep bizi düşündün,
İyi geceler dileriz!

Kız merdivenden yukarı çıktı, yatakları havalandırdı, temiz çarşaf serdi; her şey hazır olunca yaşlı adam yukarı çıkıp yataklardan birine yattı; ak sakalı ta yere kadar sarktı. Kız öbür yatağa yattı, duasını etti ve derin bir uykuya daldı. Gece yarısına kadar böyle uyudu. Derken evde bir gürültü oldu, kız uyandı. Tüm ev her köşesinden zangır zangır titredi, kapı açıldı ve çatıdaki duvara vurdu. Kirişler yerinden oynadı, merdiven çökecekmiş gibi oldu; sonra öyle bir çatırtı duyuldu ki, sanki dam çöküyordu. Ama birden ortalığı bir sessizlik kapladı. Kıza hiçbir şey olmamıştı, yattığı yerde sakince kaldı ve sonra uyudu. Ertesi sabah gün ışığıyla uyanınca bir de ne görsün? Koskoca oda, görkemli bir saraya dönüşmüştü; her taraf pırıl pırıldı. Duvarları kaplayan yeşil renkteki ipek kumaşlar altın çiçeklerle donanmıştı. Tavan kırmızı kadifeyle kaplıydı. Yatak fildişindendi. Bir iskemlenin yanında incilerle süslü bir çift terlik duruyordu. Kız rüya gördüğünü sandı. Ama aynı anda zengin giysileriyle üç tane hizmetçi girdi içeriye ve "Ne emredersiniz?" diye sordular. "Gidin şimdi. Ben kalkıp yaşlı adama çorbasını yapayım, sonra da güzel tavukla horozu ve alacalı ineği besleyeyim" dedi kız. Yaşlı adamın çoktan kalkmış olacağını düşünerek onun yatağına baktı, ama onun yerine yatakta bir delikanlı yatmaktaydı. Çok genç ve yakışıklıydı delikanlı.

Oğlan yatağında doğrularak şöyle dedi: "Ben bir prensim. Kötü bir cadının lanetine uğrayarak aksakallı, yaşlı bir adam olarak ormanda yaşamaya mahkûm edildim. Çevremde tavuk, horoz ve alacalı inek kılığına girmiş üç hizmetçimden başka hiç kimse olmadı. Bu büyü ancak sadece insanlara değil hayvanlara karşı da sevecen davranan, iyi kalpli bir kız çıkıp gelinceye kadar sürecekti. İşte sen geldin ve dün gece yarısı bu büyüyü bozdun; orman evi de yine saraya dönüştü." Hepsi kalktıktan sonra prens hizmetçilerine kızın anne ve babasını getirmelerini, sonra da düğün hazırlıklarının başlamasını emretti. "Ablalarım ne olacak?" diye sordu kız. "Onları mahzene tıktım. İkisi de bundan böyle bir kömürcünün yanında kalıp çalışacaklar, ta ki huylarını düzeltip hayvanlara iyi bakmayı öğreninceye kadar" dedi prens.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.