ENGLISH

The poor boy in the grave

日本語

墓へはいった哀れな小僧


There was once a poor shepherd-boy whose father and mother were dead, and he was placed by the authorities in the house of a rich man, who was to feed him and bring him up. The man and his wife, had however, bad hearts, and were greedy and anxious about their riches, and vexed whenever any one put a morsel of their bread in his mouth. The poor young fellow might do what he liked, he got little to eat, but only so many blows the more.
One day he had to watch a hen and her chickens, but she ran through a quick-set hedge with them, and a hawk darted down instantly, and carried her off through the air. The boy called, "Thief! thief! rascal!" with all the strength of his body. But what good did that do? The hawk did not bring its prey back again. The man heard the noise, and ran to the spot, and as soon as he saw that his hen was gone, he fell in a rage, and gave the boy such a beating that he could not stir for two days. Then he had to take care of the chickens without the hen, but now his difficulty was greater, for one ran here and the other there. He thought he was doing a very wise thing when he tied them all together with a string, because then the hawk would not be able to steal any of them away from him. But he was very much mistaken. After two days, worn out with running about and hunger, he fell asleep; the bird of prey came, and seized one of the chickens, and as the others were tied fast to it, it carried them all off together, perched itself on a tree, and devoured them. The farmer was just coming home, and when he saw the misfortune, he got angry and beat the boy so unmercifully that he was forced to lie in bed for several days.

When he was on his legs again, the farmer said to him, "Thou art too stupid for me, I cannot make a herdsman of thee, thou must go as errand-boy." Then he sent him to the judge, to whom he was to carry a basketful of grapes, and he gave him a letter as well. On the way hunger and thirst tormented the unhappy boy so violently that he ate two of the bunches of grapes. He took the basket to the judge, but when the judge had read the letter, and counted the bunches he said, "Two clusters are wanting." The boy confessed quite honestly that, driven by hunger and thirst, he had devoured the two which were wanting. The judge wrote a letter to the farmer, and asked for the same number of grapes again. These also the boy had to take to him with a letter. As he again was so extremely hungry and thirsty, he could not help it, and again ate two bunches. But first he took the letter out of the basket, put it under a stone and seated himself thereon in order that the letter might not see and betray him. The judge, however, again made him give an explanation about the missing bunches. "Ah," said the boy, "how have you learnt that?" The letter could not know about it, for I put it under a stone before I did it." The judge could not help laughing at the boy's simplicity, and sent the man a letter wherein he cautioned him to keep the poor boy better, and not let him want for meat and drink, and also that he was to teach him what was right and what was wrong.

"I will soon show thee the difference," said the hard man, "if thou wilt eat, thou must work, and if thou dost anything wrong, thou shalt be quite sufficiently taught by blows."

The next day he set him a hard task. He was to chop two bundles of straw for food for the horses, and then the man threatened: "In five hours," said he, "I shall be back again, and if the straw is not cut to chaff by that time, I will beat thee until thou canst not move a limb." The farmer went with his wife, the man-servant and the girl, to the yearly fair, and left nothing behind for the boy but a small bit of bread. The boy seated himself on the bench, and began to work with all his might. As he got warm over it he put his little coat off and threw it on the straw. In his terror lest he should not get done in time he kept constantly cutting, and in his haste, without noticing it, he chopped his little coat as well as the straw. He became aware of the misfortune too late; there was no repairing it. "Ah," cried he, "now all is over with me! The wicked man did not threaten me for nothing; if he comes back and sees what I have done, he will kill me. Rather than that I will take my own life."

The boy had once heard the farmer's wife say, "I have a pot with poison in it under my bed." She, however, had only said that to keep away greedy people, for there was honey in it. The boy crept under the bed, brought out the pot, and ate all that was in it. "I do not know," said he, "folks say death is bitter, but it tastes very sweet to me. It is no wonder that the farmer's wife has so often longed for death." He seated himself in a little chair, and was prepared to die. But instead of becoming weaker he felt himself strengthened by the nourishing food. "It cannot have been poison," thought he, "but the farmer once said there was a small bottle of poison for flies in the box in which he keeps his clothes; that, no doubt, will be the true poison, and bring death to me." It was, however, no poison for flies, but Hungarian wine. The boy got out the bottle, and emptied it. "This death tastes sweet too," said he, but shortly after when the wine began to mount into his brain and stupefy him, he thought his end was drawing near. "I feel that I must die," said he, "I will go away to the churchyard, and seek a grave." He staggered out, reached the churchyard, and laid himself in a newly dug grave. He lost his senses more and more. In the neighbourhood was an inn where a wedding was being kept; when he heard the music, he fancied he was already in Paradise, until at length he lost all consciousness. The poor boy never awoke again; the heat of the strong wine and the cold night-dew deprived him of life, and he remained in the grave in which he had laid himself.

When the farmer heard the news of the boy's death he was terrified, and afraid of being brought to justice indeed, his distress took such a powerful hold of him that he fell fainting to the ground. His wife, who was standing on the hearth with a pan of hot fat, ran to him to help him. But the flames darted against the pan, the whole house caught fire, in a few hours it lay in ashes, and the rest of the years they had to live they passed in poverty and misery, tormented by the pangs of conscience.
昔、かわいそうな羊飼いの男の子がいました。父親も母親も亡くなってしまったので、お役所が、食べ物を与え育てるようにとこの子を金持ちの家に預けました。ところが、この男もおかみさんも心の悪い人で、欲が深く自分たちの金を守るのにきゅうきゅうとして、ひとが自分たちのパンを一口でも食べることを嫌がりました。可哀そうなこの子は男の気に入ることは何でもやりましたが、食べ物はほとんどもらえず、ただうんとなぐられるだけでした。

ある日、男の子はめんどりとひよこの番をさせられました。しかし、めんどりがひよこたちと一緒に生け垣の間から外へ出てしまい、タカがすぐに舞い降りてめんどりを空にさらってしまいました。男の子は「泥棒、泥棒、悪党」とありったけの声を出して叫びましたが、何の役にも立ちませんでした。タカは獲物を戻したりしませんでした。男が物音を聞きつけ、その場へ走ってきました。めんどりがいなくなったとわかるとすぐに、かんかんに怒って男の子をこっぴどくなぐり、男の子は二日間動けませんでした。それからはめんどりのいないひよこたちの面倒をみなければなりませんでした。しかし、今度はよけい難しくなりました。というのはひよこたちは一羽がこっち、もう一羽はあっちと勝手に行くようになったからです。それで名案だと思って、ひよこたちを一本の紐でつなぎました。これならタカはひよこを一羽も盗めないだろうと思ったのです。ところがそれはまったく間違っていました。二日後、男の子は走り回ったのとお腹がすいたことで疲れ果て、眠ってしまいました。獲物を狙う鳥がやってきて一羽のひよこをつかまえました。それで他のひよこたちもしっかりつながっていたのでみんな一緒にさらわれて、タカは木の上にとまって食べてしまいました。主人の百姓がちょうど帰ってきて、この災難を見ると怒って男の子を情け容赦なくなぐったので、男の子は数日ベッドに臥せっているしかありませんでした。

男の子がまた歩けるようになると、お百姓は「お前は大馬鹿だ。お前に家畜の番はさせられないな。使い走りの仕事をしろ。」と言いました。それで男の子を裁判官のところへ使いにやり、ひとかごのブドウを持たせ、手紙も渡しました。途中であまりにおなかがすいて喉も渇いたので、男の子はぶどうを二房食べてしまいました。裁判官にかごを持って行きましたが、裁判官は手紙を読んでブドウを数え、「二房足りないな。」と言いました。男の子は、足りない二房はお腹がすいて喉が渇いたので私が食べてしまいました、とすっかり正直に白状しました。裁判官はお百姓に手紙を書き、また同じ数だけブドウを頼みました。これもまた男の子は手紙と一緒に持って行かされました。それで、とてもお腹がすいて喉が渇いたので、仕方なくまた二房ブドウを食べました。しかし、食べる前に手紙にばれないように自分が見えなくするため、かごから手紙をとって石の下に置き、その上に座りました。ところが、裁判官はまた足りないブドウについて男の子に尋ねました。「あれ?」と男の子は言いました。「どうしてわかったんですか?手紙は分からなかった筈なんです。だって食べる前に石の下に置いたんだもの。」裁判官はこの子の無知を笑わざるをえませんでした。裁判官は男に手紙を送り、可哀そうな男の子の面倒をもっとよく見て、食べ物や飲み物を十分与え、良いことと悪いことをきちんと教えなければいけない、と注意しました。「お前に違いを教えてやる。」と心の冷たい男は言いました。「食べたいなら働くことだ。悪いことをすれば、たっぷり殴って教えてやるよ。」

次の日、男は子供に厳しい仕事をさせました。男は、二束の干し草を切って馬の飼葉にするようにと言いつけ、そのときに脅して、「五時間でおれは戻るからな。その時までに、干し草を切っていなかったら足腰が立たなくなるまで殴るぞ。」と言いました。百姓はおかみさんと下男と女中と一緒に年の市にでかけ、男の子には小さなパンを一切れしか残していきませんでした。

男の子はベンチに座り必死に働き始めました。働いて熱くなったので、小さな上着を脱ぎ干し草の上に放り投げました。時間内に終わらないのではないかとびくびくしていたので、休みなくずっと切り続け、急いでいたので気づかずに干し草と一緒に自分の上着も切ってしまいました。気がついたときはもう遅過ぎて、この災難は取り返しがつきませんでした。「わあ」と男の子は叫びました。「これでもう僕はお終いだ。意地悪なだんなはただ脅したんじゃないんだ。戻ってきて僕がやったことを知ったら、僕を殺すよ。それならいっそ自分で死んだ方がいい。」男の子は前におかみさんが、ベッドの下に毒入りのつぼを置いてある、と言うのを聞いたことがありました。ところが、本当はおかみさんは食いしん坊を遠ざけるために言っただけで、つぼの中には蜂蜜が入っていたのです。男の子はベッドの下に這っていき、つぼをとりだして、中に入っていたのを全部食べてしまいました。「わからないな」と男の子は言いました。「死ぬのは苦いと人は言ってるけれど、僕にはとても甘い味がする。おかみさんがよく死にたがるのも不思議じゃないよ。」

男の子は小さな椅子に座り、死ぬ覚悟をしました。しかし、体が弱まっていくのではなく、栄養のある食べ物で強くなっていくように感じました。「きっとあれは毒ではなかったんだ。」と男の子は思いましたが、前に百姓が服を入れておくタンスにハエを殺す毒の小ビンがあると言っていたのを思い出しました。「あれは、きっと本当の毒で、飲んだら死ぬだろう。」ところがそれはハエ用の毒なんかではなく、ハンガリーワインでした。男の子はビンをとり出し、飲み干しました。「この死も甘い味がする。」と男の子は言いました。しかし、まもなくワインがまわってきて、頭がぼうっとしてくると、もう終わりが近づいていると思いました。「もう死ぬにちがいない」と男の子は言いました。「墓地へ行って墓をさがそう。」ふらふら歩いていき、墓地に着くと新しく掘った墓に体を横たえました。そしてだんだん気が遠くなっていきました。近くに結婚式が行われている宿屋がありました。男の子はその音楽を聞いて、もう天国にいるんだなと思い、そのうちとうとう気を失ってしまいました。可哀そうな男の子は二度と目を覚ましませんでした。強いワインの熱と冷たい夜露のために死んでしまったのです。男の子は身を横たえた墓にそのままずっといました。

百姓は男の子が死んだ知らせを聞くと驚き、裁判にかけられるのではないかと恐れました。実際それが心配で心配のあまり気絶して地面に倒れました。おかみさんは、熱い油の入った鍋をかけてかまどの近くに立っていましたが、亭主を助け起こそうと走っていきました。しかし、鍋に火が燃え移って家じゅうが火の海になり、2,3時間もすると灰になってしまいました。二人は死ぬまで良心の呵責に苦しみながら、貧しく惨めに暮らさなければなりませんでした。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.