ENGLISH

The true bride

ITALIANO

La vera sposa


There was once on a time a girl who was young and beautiful, but she had lost her mother when she was quite a child, and her step-mother did all she could to make the girl's life wretched. Whenever this woman gave her anything to do, she worked at it indefatigably, and did everything that lay in her power. Still she could not touch the heart of the wicked woman by that; she was never satisfied; it was never enough. The harder the girl worked, the more work was put upon her, and all that the woman thought of was how to weigh her down with still heavier burdens, and make her life still more miserable.
One day she said to her, "Here are twelve pounds of feathers which thou must pick, and if they are not done this evening, thou mayst expect a good beating. Dost thou imagine thou art to idle away the whole day?" The poor girl sat down to the work, but tears ran down her cheeks as she did so, for she saw plainly enough that it was quite impossible to finish the work in one day. Whenever she had a little heap of feathers lying before her, and she sighed or smote her hands together in her anguish, they flew away, and she had to pick them out again, and begin her work anew. Then she put her elbows on the table, laid her face in her two hands, and cried, "Is there no one, then, on God's earth to have pity on me?" Then she heard a low voice which said, "Be comforted, my child, I have come to help thee." The maiden looked up, and an old woman was by her side. She took the girl kindly by the hand, and said, "Only tell me what is troubling thee." As she spoke so kindly, the girl told her of her miserable life, and how one burden after another was laid upon her, and she never could get to the end of the work which was given to her. "If I have not done these feathers by this evening, my step-mother will beat me; she has threatened she will, and I know she keeps her word." Her tears began to flow again, but the good old woman said, "Do not be afraid, my child; rest a while, and in the meantime I will look to thy work." The girl lay down on her bed, and soon fell asleep. The old woman seated herself at the table with the feathers, and how they did fly off the quills, which she scarcely touched with her withered hands! The twelve pounds were soon finished, and when the girl awoke, great snow-white heaps were lying, piled up, and everything in the room was neatly cleared away, but the old woman had vanished. The maiden thanked God, and sat still till evening came, when the step-mother came in and marvelled to see the work completed. "Just look, you awkward creature," said she, "what can be done when people are industrious; and why couldst thou not set about something else? There thou sittest with thy hands crossed." When she went out she said, "The creature is worth more than her salt. I must give her some work that is still harder."

Next morning she called the girl, and said, "There is a spoon for thee; with that thou must empty out for me the great pond which is beside the garden, and if it is not done by night, thou knowest what will happen." The girl took the spoon, and saw that it was full of holes; but even if it had not been, she never could have emptied the pond with it. She set to work at once, knelt down by the water, into which her tears were falling, and began to empty it. But the good old woman appeared again, and when she learnt the cause of her grief, she said, "Be of good cheer, my child. Go into the thicket and lie down and sleep; I will soon do thy work." As soon as the old woman was alone, she barely touched the pond, and a vapour rose up on high from the water, and mingled itself with the clouds. Gradually the pond was emptied, and when the maiden awoke before sunset and came thither, she saw nothing but the fishes which were struggling in the mud. She went to her step-mother, and showed her that the work was done. "It ought to have been done long before this," said she, and grew white with anger, but she meditated something new.

On the third morning she said to the girl, "Thou must build me a castle on the plain there, and it must be ready by the evening." The maiden was dismayed, and said, "How can I complete such a great work?" - "I will endure no opposition," screamed the step-mother. If thou canst empty a pond with a spoon that is full of holes, thou canst build a castle too. I will take possession of it this very day, and if anything is wanting, even if it be the most trifling thing in the kitchen or cellar, thou knowest what lies before thee!" She drove the girl out, and when she entered the valley, the rocks were there, piled up one above the other, and all her strength would not have enabled her even to move the very smallest of them. She sat down and wept, and still she hoped the old woman would help her. The old woman was not long in coming; she comforted her and said, "Lie down there in the shade and sleep, and I will soon build the castle for thee. If it would be a pleasure to thee, thou canst live in it thyself." When the maiden had gone away, the old woman touched the gray rocks. They began to rise, and immediately moved together as if giants had built the walls; and on these the building arose, and it seemed as if countless hands were working invisibly, and placing one stone upon another. There was a dull heavy noise from the ground; pillars arose of their own accord on high, and placed themselves in order near each other. The tiles laid themselves in order on the roof, and when noon-day came, the great weather-cock was already turning itself on the summit of the tower, like a golden figure of the Virgin with fluttering garments. The inside of the castle was being finished while evening was drawing near. How the old woman managed it, I know not; but the walls of the rooms were hung with silk and velvet, embroidered chairs were there, and richly ornamented arm-chairs by marble tables; crystal chandeliers hung down from the ceilings, and mirrored themselves in the smooth pavement; green parrots were there in gilt cages, and so were strange birds which sang most beautifully, and there was on all sides as much magnificence as if a king were going to live there. The sun was just setting when the girl awoke, and the brightness of a thousand lights flashed in her face. She hurried to the castle, and entered by the open door. The steps were spread with red cloth, and the golden balustrade beset with flowering trees. When she saw the splendour of the apartment, she stood as if turned to stone. Who knows how long she might have stood there if she had not remembered the step-mother? "Alas!" she said to herself, "if she could but be satisfied at last, and would give up making my life a misery to me." The girl went and told her that the castle was ready. "I will move into it at once," said she, and rose from her seat. When they entered the castle, she was forced to hold her hand before her eyes, the brilliancy of everything was so dazzling. "Thou seest," said she to the girl, "how easy it has been for thee to do this; I ought to have given thee something harder." She went through all the rooms, and examined every corner to see if anything was wanting or defective; but she could discover nothing. "Now we will go down below," said she, looking at the girl with malicious eyes. "The kitchen and the cellar still have to be examined, and if thou hast forgotten anything thou shalt not escape thy punishment." But the fire was burning on the hearth, and the meat was cooking in the pans, the tongs and shovel were leaning against the wall, and the shining brazen utensils all arranged in sight. Nothing was wanting, not even a coal-box and water-pail. "Which is the way to the cellar?" she cried. "If that is not abundantly filled, it shall go ill with thee." She herself raised up the trap-door and descended; but she had hardly made two steps before the heavy trap-door which was only laid back, fell down. The girl heard a scream, lifted up the door very quickly to go to her aid, but she had fallen down, and the girl found her lying lifeless at the bottom.

And now the magnificent castle belonged to the girl alone. She at first did not know how to reconcile herself to her good fortune. Beautiful dresses were hanging in the wardrobes, the chests were filled with gold or silver, or with pearls and jewels, and she never felt a desire that she was not able to gratify. And soon the fame of the beauty and riches of the maiden went over all the world. Wooers presented themselves daily, but none pleased her. At length the son of the King came and he knew how to touch her heart, and she betrothed herself to him. In the garden of the castle was a lime-tree, under which they were one day sitting together, when he said to her, "I will go home and obtain my father's consent to our marriage. I entreat thee to wait for me here under this lime-tree, I shall be back with thee in a few hours." The maiden kissed him on his left cheek, and said, "Keep true to me, and never let any one else kiss thee on this cheek. I will wait here under the lime-tree until thou returnest.

The maid stayed beneath the lime-tree until sunset, but he did not return. She sat three days from morning till evening, waiting for him, but in vain. As he still was not there by the fourth day, she said, "Some accident has assuredly befallen him. I will go out and seek him, and will not come back until I have found him." She packed up three of her most beautiful dresses, one embroidered with bright stars, the second with silver moons, the third with golden suns, tied up a handful of jewels in her handkerchief, and set out. She inquired everywhere for her betrothed, but no one had seen him; no one knew anything about him. Far and wide did she wander through the world, but she found him not. At last she hired herself to a farmer as a cow-herd, and buried her dresses and jewels beneath a stone.

And now she lived as a herdswoman, guarded her herd, and was very sad and full of longing for her beloved one; she had a little calf which she taught to know her, and fed it out of her own hand, and when she said,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
the little calf knelt down, and she stroked it.
And when she had lived for a couple of years alone and full of grief, a report was spread over all the land that the King's daughter was about to celebrate her marriage. The road to the town passed through the village where the maiden was living, and it came to pass that once when the maiden was driving out her herd, her bridegroom travelled by. He was sitting proudly on his horse, and never looked round, but when she saw him she recognized her beloved, and it was just as if a sharp knife had pierced her heart. "Alas!" said she, "I believed him true to me, but he has forgotten me."

Next day he again came along the road. When he was near her she said to the little calf,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
When he was aware of the voice, he looked down and reined in his horse. He looked into the herd's face, and then put his hands before his eyes as if he were trying to remember something, but he soon rode onwards and was out of sight. "Alas!" said she, "he no longer knows me," and her grief was ever greater.
Soon after this a great festival three days long was to be held at the King's court, and the whole country was invited to it.

"Now will I try my last chance," thought the maiden, and when evening came she went to the stone under which she had buried her treasures. She took out the dress with the golden suns, put it on, and adorned herself with the jewels. She let down her hair, which she had concealed under a handkerchief, and it fell down in long curls about her, and thus she went into the town, and in the darkness was observed by no one. When she entered the brightly-lighted hall, every one started back in amazement, but no one knew who she was. The King's son went to meet her, but he did not recognize her. He led her out to dance, and was so enchanted with her beauty, that he thought no more of the other bride. When the feast was over, she vanished in the crowd, and hastened before daybreak to the village, where she once more put on her herd's dress.

Next evening she took out the dress with the silver moons, and put a half-moon made of precious stones in her hair. When she appeared at the festival, all eyes were turned upon her, but the King's son hastened to meet her, and filled with love for her, danced with her alone, and no longer so much as glanced at anyone else. Before she went away she was forced to promise him to come again to the festival on the last evening.

When she appeared for the third time, she wore the star-dress which sparkled at every step she took, and her hair-ribbon and girdle were starred with jewels. The prince had already been waiting for her for a long time, and forced his way up to her. "Do but tell who thou art," said he, "I feel just as if I had already known thee a long time." - "Dost thou not know what I did when thou leftest me?" Then she stepped up to him, and kissed him on his left cheek, and in a moment it was as if scales fell from his eyes, and he recognized the true bride. "Come," said he to her, "here I stay no longer," gave her his hand, and led her down to the carriage. The horses hurried away to the magic castle as if the wind had been harnessed to the carriage. The illuminated windows already shone in the distance. When they drove past the lime-tree, countless glow-worms were swarming about it. It shook its branches, and sent forth their fragrance. On the steps flowers were blooming, and the room echoed with the song of strange birds, but in the hall the entire court was assembled, and the priest was waiting to marry the bridegroom to the true bride.
C'era una volta una fanciulla, che era giovane e bella; ma presto le era morta la madre, e la matrigna la tormentava in tutti i modi. Quando le si ordinava un lavoro, per quanto fosse pesante, la ragazza ci si applicava di buona volontà e faceva tutto quel che poteva. Ma pure non riusciva a toccar il cuore di quelli perfida donna, sempre scontenta e incontentabile. Quanto più grande era il suo impegno, tanto più lavoro le veniva imposto: e la matrigna non aveva altro in mente che di addossarle un peso sempre più grave, così da renderle la vita impossibile.

Un giorno le disse: "Qui hai dodici libbre di piume; devi ripulirle e, se non finisci entro stasera, ti aspetta un carico di busse. Credi forse di poter poltrire tutto il giorno?" La povera fanciulla sedette e si mise al lavoro, ma intanto le lacrime le correvan giù per le guance; perché vedeva bene che era impossibile finire in un giorno. Quando aveva dinanzi un mucchietto di piume, e sospirava o si torceva le mani dall'angoscia, le piume si disperdevano ed ella doveva raccoglierle e ricominciar da capo. Finalmente appoggiò i gomiti sulla tavola, e così viso fra le mani gridò: "Non c'è dunque nessuno al mondo, che abbia pietà di me?" Ed ecco, udì una voce soave che diceva: "Consolati, bimba mia, sono venuta ad aiutarti." La fanciulla alzò gli occhi: accanto a lei c'era una vecchia, che la prese amorevolmente per mano e disse: "Confidami la tua angoscia." Parlava così affettuosamente che la fanciulla le narrò la sua triste vita, e che le gettavano addosso un peso dopo l'altro, e che non poteva finire i lavori che le davano. "Se non finisco di pulire queste piume entro stasera, la matrigna mi picchia; me l'ha promesso, e so che tiene la parola." Le sue lacrime ripresero a scorrere, ma la buona vecchia le disse: "Stà tranquilla, bimba mia, riposati; e io intanto farò il tuo lavoro." La fanciulla si sdraiò sul suo letto e non tardò a prender sonno. La vecchia sedette alla tavola davanti alle piume; oh, come si staccano dalle nervature, che essa toccava appena con le sue mani scarne! Le dodici libbre furon presto finite! Quando la fanciulla si svegliò, ecco ammassati dei grandi mucchi bianchi come la neve, e la camera era tutta linda e ordinata; ma la vecchia era scomparsa. La fanciulla ringraziò Dio e restò là tranquilla fino a sera. Allora entrò la matrigna e si meravigliò che avesse finito il lavoro: "Vedi, ragazzaccia," disse, "quel che si può fare, a metterci impegno? Non avresti potuto fare qualcos'altro? Ma tu stai lì seduta con le mani in mano!" Uscendo disse: "Quella creatura la sa lunga, devo darle un lavoro più difficile."

Il mattino dopo, chiamò la fanciulla e le disse: "Qui c'è un cucchiaio; prendilo, e vuota il grande stagno che è accanto al giardino. Se stasera non ne sei venuta a capo, sai quel che succede." La fanciulla prese il cucchiaio e vide che c'era un forel-lino; e se anche non ci fosse stato, non avrebbe mai potuto vuotar lo stagno. Si mise subito al lavoro, s'inginocchiò in riva all'acqua, dove cadevan le sue lacrime, e cominciò il lavoro. Ma comparve di nuovo la buona vecchia, e quando seppe la ragione del suo pianto, le disse: "Sta' tranquilla, bimba mia, và nel boschetto e mettiti a dormire; farò io il tuo lavoro." Quando la vecchia fu sola, bastò che toccasse lo stagno: l'acqua si faceva vapore e saliva su in alto e si mescolava alle nubi. Lo stagno si vuotò a poco a poco; e prima del tramonto, quando la fanciulla si svegliò e andò sulla riva, vide soltanto i pesci dibattersi nella melma. Andò dalla matrigna e le annunziò che il lavoro era compiuto. "Avrebbe dovuto esser finito da un pezzo!," disse quella; e impallidì di stizza, ma meditò qualcosa di nuovo. La terza mattina disse alla fanciulla: "Devi costruirmi un bel castello, là, nella pianura, e dovrà esser pronto per stasera." La fanciulla si spaventò e disse: "Ma come potrei fare un così gran lavoro?" - "Non tollero che mi si contraddica!," gridò la matrigna. "Se puoi vuotare uno stagno con un cucchiaio bucato, puoi anche costruire un castello. Voglio andarci ad abitare oggi stesso; e, se ci manca solo qualche cosa in cucina o in cantina, sai quel che t'aspetta." Cacciò via la fanciulla, che andò nella valle: là c'erano dei massi accatastati gli uni sugli altri; pur mettendoci tutta la sua forza, ella non poteva neanche smuovere i più piccoli. Si mise a sedere e pianse, ma sperava nell'aiuto della buona vecchia. E infatti questa non si fece aspettare; comparve e la confortò: "Sdraiati all'ombra e dormi! intanto il castello lo farò io. Se ti piace, potrai abitarci tu." Quando la fanciulla se ne fu andata, la vecchia toccò i massi grigi. Subito questi si mossero, si congiunsero, ed eccoli ritti come una muraglia costruita dai giganti; poi prese a innalzarsi l'edificio, e parve che innumerevoli mani lavorassero invisibili e mettessero pietra su pietra. Il suolo rimbombava, s'elevavano grandi colonne, ponendosi ordinatamente l'una presso l'altra. Sul tetto si disposero le tegole, e quando fu mezzogiorno la grande banderuola girava già in cima alla torre, come una fanciulla d'oro con un drappo svolazzante. L'interno del castello fu compiuto prima di notte. Come avesse fatto la vecchia non lo so: ma le pareti delle stanze erano tappezzate di seta e di velluto, accanto a tavole di marmo c'eran sedie dai ricami variopinti e poltrone riccamente ornate; lampadari di cristallo pendevano dal soffitto e si specchiavano nel pavimento lucido; in gabbie d'oro erano rinchiusi pappagalli verdi e uccelli rari, che cantavano soavemente: c'era dappertutto tanto sfarzo, che pareva dovesse venirci ad abitare un re. Il sole stava per tramontare, quando la fanciulla si svegliò; e dinanzi a lei sfolgorò lo splendore di mille luci. A passi di corsa arrivò al castello e vi entrò per il portone spalancato. La scalinata era coperta di panno rosso e la balaustra d'oro era adorna di piante in fiore. Quando la fanciulla vide il lusso delle stanze, si fermò come impietrita. E lì sarebbe rimasta chissà quanto, se non si fosse ricordata della matrigna. ' Ah ', pensò, ' se finalmente fosse contenta e non mi tormentasse più! ' Andò e le annunziò che il castello era finito. "Voglio andarci ad abitare subito!," disse la matrigna, e si alzò dalla seggiola. Quando entrò nel castello. dovette proteggersi gli occhi con la mano, tanto quello splendore l'abbagliava. "Vedi," disse alla fanciulla, "che cosa da nulla è st ata! Avrei dovuto darti un compito più difficile." Attraversò tutte le stanze, e dappertutto andò a cacciare il naso, se mai mancasse qualcosa o ci fosse qualche difetto, ma non riuscì a scoprir nulla. "Adesso scendiamo!," disse, e guardò la fanciulla con occhi maligni. "Devo ancor visitar la cucina e la cantina, e se hai dimenticato qualcosa, non potrai sfuggire al tuo castigo." Ma il fuoco ardeva sul focolare, nelle pentole cuocevan le vivande, e là appoggiato c'eran le molle e la paletta, e alle pareti brillava il vasellame d'ottone. Non mancava nulla, neppure la cassetta del carbone e la secchia per l'acqua. "Dov'è che si scende in cantina?, gridò la matrigna: "Se non è ben fornita di botti piene di vino, guai a te!" Sollevò lei stessa la ribalta e scese la scala; ma aveva appena fatto due passi che il pesante sportello, malamente appoggiato, ricadde. La fanciulla udì un grido, aprì in fretta la botola per venirle in aiuto, ma la matrigna era precipitata, ed ella la trovò che giaceva morta al suolo.

Ora lo splendido castello apparteneva soltanto alla fanciulla. Nei primi tempi, ella non sapeva abituarsi alla sua fortuna: belle vesti erano appese negli armadi, i forzieri erano pieni d'oro e d'argento o di perle e di pietre preziose, e per lei non c'era desiderio che non potesse soddisfare. Ben presto si sparse per tutto il mondo la fama della sua bellezza e della sua ricchezza: pretendenti ne venivan tutti i giorni, ma nessuno le piaceva. Alla fine si presentò anche il figlio di un re, che seppe toccarle il cuore, e si fidanzarono. Nel giardino del castello c'era un verde tiglio; e un giorno, che sedevano là sotto, e parlavano fra loro in confidenza, egli le disse: "Voglio andar a casa, a chiedere il consenso di mio padre per le nostre nozze; ti prego, aspettami qui, sotto questo tiglio: fra poche ore sarò di ritorno." La fanciulla lo baciò sulla guancia sinistra e disse: "Restami fedele, e non lasciarti baciare da nessun'altra su questa guancia. Qui, sotto il tiglio, aspetterò il tuo ritorno." E sotto il tiglio restò seduta fino al tramonto ma egli non tornò. Là stette per tre giorni ad aspettarlo, dal mattino fino a sera, ma invano. Il quarto giorno, poiché non era ancora tornato, ella disse: "Certo gli è successo una disgrazia, andrò a cercarlo e non tornerò prima di averlo trovato." Fece un involto di tre dei suoi più bei vestiti, uno trapunto di stelle scintillanti, l'altro di lune d'argento, il terzo di soli d'oro; legò nel fazzoletto una manciata di pietre preziose e si mise in cammino. Domandava dappertutto del suo sposo, ma nessuno l'aveva visto, nessuno ne sapeva nulla. Girò il mondo per lungo e per largo, ma non lo trovò. Alla fine andò a far la pastora da un contadino e seppellì i suoi vestiti e le gemme sotto una pietra. E così viveva da pastora, custodiva il gregge ed era triste e si struggeva di rimpianto per il suo diletto. Aveva un vitellino; l'addomesticò gli dava da mangiare nella sua mano e gli diceva:

"Vitellino vitellino, in ginocchio posa,
non scordare la tua pastora
come il principe scordò la sposa
che sotto il tiglio
attendeva allora."

Il vitellino s'inginocchiava ed ella lo accarezzava. Aveva passato un paio d'anni afflitta e sola, quando per il paese si sparse la voce che la figlia del re stava per sposarsi. La strada della città costeggiava il villaggio dove abitava la fanciulla, e avvenne che lo sposo passò di là mentre ella menava al pascolo il suo gregge. Egli passò alteramente sul suo cavallo e non la guardò, ma fu lei a guardarlo e riconobbe il suo diletto. Fu come se un coltello tagliente le trafiggesse il cuore. "Ah," disse, "credevo che mi fosse rimasto fedele e invece mi ha dimenticata!" Il giorno dopo egli tornò a passare. Quando le fu accanto, ella disse al suo vitellino:

"Vitellino vitellino, in ginocchio posa,
non scordare la tua pastora
come il principe scordò la sposa
che sotto il tiglio
attendeva allora."

Udendo quella voce, egli abbassò gli occhi e arrestò il cavallo. Guardò in viso la pastora e con la mano si coperse gli occhi come se volesse ricordare qualcosa; ma poi proseguì in fretta e non tardò a scomparire. "Ah!," diss'ella, "non mi conosce più!" e il suo dolore era sempre più grande. Poco dopo alla corte del re si doveva celebrare una gran festa che sarebbe durata tre giorni e fu invitato tutto il paese. "Voglio far l'ultima prova!," pensò la fanciulla, e quando venne la sera andò fino alla pietra sotto cui aveva seppellito i suoi tesori. Ne tolse l'abito coi soli d'oro, l'indossò e si adornò con le gemme. Sciolse i capelli, che teneva nascosti sotto un fazzoletto, e le ricaddero in lunghi riccioli sulle spalle. Così s'incamminò verso la città e nel buio nessuno la scorse. Quando entrò nella sala splendidamente illuminata, tutti le cedevano il passo stupefatti, ma nessuno sapeva chi ella fosse. Il principe le andò incontro, ma non la riconobbe. La invitò a ballare e, rapito dalla sua bellezza, non pensava più affatto all'altra sposa. Quando la festa ebbe fine, ella scomparve tra la folla e prima dell'alba tornò in fretta al villaggio, dove indossò di nuovo la sua veste di pastora. La sera dopo prese l'abito con le lune d'argento, e si mise nei capelli una mezzaluna di pietre preziose. Quando comparve alla festa, tutti gli occhi si volsero a lei, ma il principe le corse incontro e, ardente d'amore, ballò soltanto con lei e non guardò più nessun'altra. Prima di andar via, ella dovette promettergli di tornare alla festa per l'ultima sera. Quando apparve la terza volta, aveva l'abito di stelle che sfavillava a ogni passo, e il nastro dei capelli e la cintura erano stelle di pietre preziose. Il principe l'aspettava già da un pezzo e tra la folla si aprì un varco fino a lei. "Dimmi dunque chi sei!," le disse, "mi pare di averti conosciuta già da molto tempo." - "Non ti ricordi," rispose la fanciulla, "quel che ho fatto quando mi lasciasti?" Gli s'accostò e lo baciò sulla guancia sinistra: e subito fu come se gli cadesse una benda dagli occhi ed egli riconobbe la vera sposa. "Vieni!," le disse, "qui non voglio più restare." Le porse la mano e l'accompagnò alla carrozza. Veloci come il vento, ì cavalli corsero al castello meraviglioso. Già da lontano brillavano le finestre illuminate. Quando passarono davanti al tiglio, là sotto vagavano innumerevoli lucciole, e l'albero scosse i rami e mandò il suo profumo. Sulla scala sbocciavano i fiori, dalla stanza veniva il canto degli uccelli rari; ma nella sala era riunita tutta la corte e il prete aspettava di unire in matrimonio il principe e la sua vera sposa.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.