ENGLISH

The true bride

日本語

本当の花嫁


There was once on a time a girl who was young and beautiful, but she had lost her mother when she was quite a child, and her step-mother did all she could to make the girl's life wretched. Whenever this woman gave her anything to do, she worked at it indefatigably, and did everything that lay in her power. Still she could not touch the heart of the wicked woman by that; she was never satisfied; it was never enough. The harder the girl worked, the more work was put upon her, and all that the woman thought of was how to weigh her down with still heavier burdens, and make her life still more miserable.
One day she said to her, "Here are twelve pounds of feathers which thou must pick, and if they are not done this evening, thou mayst expect a good beating. Dost thou imagine thou art to idle away the whole day?" The poor girl sat down to the work, but tears ran down her cheeks as she did so, for she saw plainly enough that it was quite impossible to finish the work in one day. Whenever she had a little heap of feathers lying before her, and she sighed or smote her hands together in her anguish, they flew away, and she had to pick them out again, and begin her work anew. Then she put her elbows on the table, laid her face in her two hands, and cried, "Is there no one, then, on God's earth to have pity on me?" Then she heard a low voice which said, "Be comforted, my child, I have come to help thee." The maiden looked up, and an old woman was by her side. She took the girl kindly by the hand, and said, "Only tell me what is troubling thee." As she spoke so kindly, the girl told her of her miserable life, and how one burden after another was laid upon her, and she never could get to the end of the work which was given to her. "If I have not done these feathers by this evening, my step-mother will beat me; she has threatened she will, and I know she keeps her word." Her tears began to flow again, but the good old woman said, "Do not be afraid, my child; rest a while, and in the meantime I will look to thy work." The girl lay down on her bed, and soon fell asleep. The old woman seated herself at the table with the feathers, and how they did fly off the quills, which she scarcely touched with her withered hands! The twelve pounds were soon finished, and when the girl awoke, great snow-white heaps were lying, piled up, and everything in the room was neatly cleared away, but the old woman had vanished. The maiden thanked God, and sat still till evening came, when the step-mother came in and marvelled to see the work completed. "Just look, you awkward creature," said she, "what can be done when people are industrious; and why couldst thou not set about something else? There thou sittest with thy hands crossed." When she went out she said, "The creature is worth more than her salt. I must give her some work that is still harder."

Next morning she called the girl, and said, "There is a spoon for thee; with that thou must empty out for me the great pond which is beside the garden, and if it is not done by night, thou knowest what will happen." The girl took the spoon, and saw that it was full of holes; but even if it had not been, she never could have emptied the pond with it. She set to work at once, knelt down by the water, into which her tears were falling, and began to empty it. But the good old woman appeared again, and when she learnt the cause of her grief, she said, "Be of good cheer, my child. Go into the thicket and lie down and sleep; I will soon do thy work." As soon as the old woman was alone, she barely touched the pond, and a vapour rose up on high from the water, and mingled itself with the clouds. Gradually the pond was emptied, and when the maiden awoke before sunset and came thither, she saw nothing but the fishes which were struggling in the mud. She went to her step-mother, and showed her that the work was done. "It ought to have been done long before this," said she, and grew white with anger, but she meditated something new.

On the third morning she said to the girl, "Thou must build me a castle on the plain there, and it must be ready by the evening." The maiden was dismayed, and said, "How can I complete such a great work?" - "I will endure no opposition," screamed the step-mother. If thou canst empty a pond with a spoon that is full of holes, thou canst build a castle too. I will take possession of it this very day, and if anything is wanting, even if it be the most trifling thing in the kitchen or cellar, thou knowest what lies before thee!" She drove the girl out, and when she entered the valley, the rocks were there, piled up one above the other, and all her strength would not have enabled her even to move the very smallest of them. She sat down and wept, and still she hoped the old woman would help her. The old woman was not long in coming; she comforted her and said, "Lie down there in the shade and sleep, and I will soon build the castle for thee. If it would be a pleasure to thee, thou canst live in it thyself." When the maiden had gone away, the old woman touched the gray rocks. They began to rise, and immediately moved together as if giants had built the walls; and on these the building arose, and it seemed as if countless hands were working invisibly, and placing one stone upon another. There was a dull heavy noise from the ground; pillars arose of their own accord on high, and placed themselves in order near each other. The tiles laid themselves in order on the roof, and when noon-day came, the great weather-cock was already turning itself on the summit of the tower, like a golden figure of the Virgin with fluttering garments. The inside of the castle was being finished while evening was drawing near. How the old woman managed it, I know not; but the walls of the rooms were hung with silk and velvet, embroidered chairs were there, and richly ornamented arm-chairs by marble tables; crystal chandeliers hung down from the ceilings, and mirrored themselves in the smooth pavement; green parrots were there in gilt cages, and so were strange birds which sang most beautifully, and there was on all sides as much magnificence as if a king were going to live there. The sun was just setting when the girl awoke, and the brightness of a thousand lights flashed in her face. She hurried to the castle, and entered by the open door. The steps were spread with red cloth, and the golden balustrade beset with flowering trees. When she saw the splendour of the apartment, she stood as if turned to stone. Who knows how long she might have stood there if she had not remembered the step-mother? "Alas!" she said to herself, "if she could but be satisfied at last, and would give up making my life a misery to me." The girl went and told her that the castle was ready. "I will move into it at once," said she, and rose from her seat. When they entered the castle, she was forced to hold her hand before her eyes, the brilliancy of everything was so dazzling. "Thou seest," said she to the girl, "how easy it has been for thee to do this; I ought to have given thee something harder." She went through all the rooms, and examined every corner to see if anything was wanting or defective; but she could discover nothing. "Now we will go down below," said she, looking at the girl with malicious eyes. "The kitchen and the cellar still have to be examined, and if thou hast forgotten anything thou shalt not escape thy punishment." But the fire was burning on the hearth, and the meat was cooking in the pans, the tongs and shovel were leaning against the wall, and the shining brazen utensils all arranged in sight. Nothing was wanting, not even a coal-box and water-pail. "Which is the way to the cellar?" she cried. "If that is not abundantly filled, it shall go ill with thee." She herself raised up the trap-door and descended; but she had hardly made two steps before the heavy trap-door which was only laid back, fell down. The girl heard a scream, lifted up the door very quickly to go to her aid, but she had fallen down, and the girl found her lying lifeless at the bottom.

And now the magnificent castle belonged to the girl alone. She at first did not know how to reconcile herself to her good fortune. Beautiful dresses were hanging in the wardrobes, the chests were filled with gold or silver, or with pearls and jewels, and she never felt a desire that she was not able to gratify. And soon the fame of the beauty and riches of the maiden went over all the world. Wooers presented themselves daily, but none pleased her. At length the son of the King came and he knew how to touch her heart, and she betrothed herself to him. In the garden of the castle was a lime-tree, under which they were one day sitting together, when he said to her, "I will go home and obtain my father's consent to our marriage. I entreat thee to wait for me here under this lime-tree, I shall be back with thee in a few hours." The maiden kissed him on his left cheek, and said, "Keep true to me, and never let any one else kiss thee on this cheek. I will wait here under the lime-tree until thou returnest.

The maid stayed beneath the lime-tree until sunset, but he did not return. She sat three days from morning till evening, waiting for him, but in vain. As he still was not there by the fourth day, she said, "Some accident has assuredly befallen him. I will go out and seek him, and will not come back until I have found him." She packed up three of her most beautiful dresses, one embroidered with bright stars, the second with silver moons, the third with golden suns, tied up a handful of jewels in her handkerchief, and set out. She inquired everywhere for her betrothed, but no one had seen him; no one knew anything about him. Far and wide did she wander through the world, but she found him not. At last she hired herself to a farmer as a cow-herd, and buried her dresses and jewels beneath a stone.

And now she lived as a herdswoman, guarded her herd, and was very sad and full of longing for her beloved one; she had a little calf which she taught to know her, and fed it out of her own hand, and when she said,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
the little calf knelt down, and she stroked it.
And when she had lived for a couple of years alone and full of grief, a report was spread over all the land that the King's daughter was about to celebrate her marriage. The road to the town passed through the village where the maiden was living, and it came to pass that once when the maiden was driving out her herd, her bridegroom travelled by. He was sitting proudly on his horse, and never looked round, but when she saw him she recognized her beloved, and it was just as if a sharp knife had pierced her heart. "Alas!" said she, "I believed him true to me, but he has forgotten me."

Next day he again came along the road. When he was near her she said to the little calf,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
When he was aware of the voice, he looked down and reined in his horse. He looked into the herd's face, and then put his hands before his eyes as if he were trying to remember something, but he soon rode onwards and was out of sight. "Alas!" said she, "he no longer knows me," and her grief was ever greater.
Soon after this a great festival three days long was to be held at the King's court, and the whole country was invited to it.

"Now will I try my last chance," thought the maiden, and when evening came she went to the stone under which she had buried her treasures. She took out the dress with the golden suns, put it on, and adorned herself with the jewels. She let down her hair, which she had concealed under a handkerchief, and it fell down in long curls about her, and thus she went into the town, and in the darkness was observed by no one. When she entered the brightly-lighted hall, every one started back in amazement, but no one knew who she was. The King's son went to meet her, but he did not recognize her. He led her out to dance, and was so enchanted with her beauty, that he thought no more of the other bride. When the feast was over, she vanished in the crowd, and hastened before daybreak to the village, where she once more put on her herd's dress.

Next evening she took out the dress with the silver moons, and put a half-moon made of precious stones in her hair. When she appeared at the festival, all eyes were turned upon her, but the King's son hastened to meet her, and filled with love for her, danced with her alone, and no longer so much as glanced at anyone else. Before she went away she was forced to promise him to come again to the festival on the last evening.

When she appeared for the third time, she wore the star-dress which sparkled at every step she took, and her hair-ribbon and girdle were starred with jewels. The prince had already been waiting for her for a long time, and forced his way up to her. "Do but tell who thou art," said he, "I feel just as if I had already known thee a long time." - "Dost thou not know what I did when thou leftest me?" Then she stepped up to him, and kissed him on his left cheek, and in a moment it was as if scales fell from his eyes, and he recognized the true bride. "Come," said he to her, "here I stay no longer," gave her his hand, and led her down to the carriage. The horses hurried away to the magic castle as if the wind had been harnessed to the carriage. The illuminated windows already shone in the distance. When they drove past the lime-tree, countless glow-worms were swarming about it. It shook its branches, and sent forth their fragrance. On the steps flowers were blooming, and the room echoed with the song of strange birds, but in the hall the entire court was assembled, and the priest was waiting to marry the bridegroom to the true bride.
昔、娘がいました。若くて美しかったのですが、とても小さい時に母親が亡くなり、継母がひどくいじめるので娘の暮らしは惨めなものでした。継母が何かやるように言いつけるときはいつも、娘は根気よく取り組んで何でもできる限りのことをしました。それでも娘は意地悪な継母の心をつかむことはできませんでした。継母は決して満足しないし、これでいいということは絶対ありませんでした。娘が一生懸命働けば働くほど、さらに多くの仕事が言いつけられ、継母はこの娘に、いかにもっと重荷を背負わせて、いかにもっと暮らしを惨めにさせるかを考えるだけでした。

ある日、継母は、「ここに12ポンドの羽根があるから、羽柄からつみ取るんだよ。今日の日暮れまでに終わって無かったら、たっぷりぶってやるからね。一日中ぶらぶらできると思ってるのかい?」と言いました。可哀そうに娘は座って仕事にとりかかりましたが、涙が頬を流れ落ちました。というのは一日でその仕事を終えるのは全く無理だとはっきりみてとれたからです。前に小さな羽根の山をおいて、悲しみのあまりため息をついたり手を打ちあわせたりするといつも、羽根は飛び散ってしまい、また拾い集めて仕事を新たに始めなければなりませんでした。

それで娘はテーブルに肘をつき、顔を両手にうずめて、「神様のお創りになったこの世に私を哀れに思う人はいないの?」と叫びました。すると低い声で「安心おし、娘さん、お前を助けに来たよ。」というのが聞こえてきました。娘が見上げるとおばあさんがそばにいました。おばあさんは娘の手をやさしくとり、「さあ、何を困っているのか話してごらん」と言いました。おばあさんの話し方がやさしかったので、娘は惨めな暮らしについて話し、次から次へときつい仕事を押し付けられ、言いつけられた仕事を終わりまでやりおおせられないんです、と言いました。「この羽根を今日の日暮れまでに終わらなければ、義理のお母さんは私をぶちます。そうするとおどされました。お母さんは言ったことは必ずやるんです。」そう言って娘は涙がまたあふれ始めました。しかしやさしいおばあさんは、「恐がらなくていいよ、娘さん、しばらくお休み、その間にお前の仕事をやっておくから。」娘はベッドに横になり、まもなく寝入りました。

おばあさんは羽根ののっているテーブルに座り、萎びた手で触ったかと思うとどんなに羽柄から離れていったことでしょう。12ポンドはすぐに終えられました。娘が目覚めたとき、大きな真っ白い山が積み上げられて、部屋の何もかもきれいにかたづけられていましたが、おばあさんは消えてしまっていました。乙女は神様にお礼を言い、夕方になるまでじっと座っていました。夕方に継母が入って来て、仕事が終わっているのを見て目をみはりました。「ほらごらんな、嫌な子だねえ」と継母は言いました。「一生懸命やればできるものをね。それでなんでお前は他のことをしなかったのさ?手をこまねいて座ってるんだから、全く。」外へ出ると継母は、「ふん、少しはやるね、もっと難しい仕事をさせなくっちゃ。」と言いました。

次の朝、継母は娘を呼んで、「お前にスプーンをやるから、庭のそばにある大きな池を汲みだしておくれ。夜までにやらなければどうなるか知ってるよね。」と言いました。娘がスプーンをとってみると、穴だらけでした。しかし穴が無かったとしても、それで池を空っぽにすることはできなかったでしょうが。娘はすぐに仕事に取り掛かり、自分の涙が落ちていく水のそばに膝まづいて汲み始めました。しかし、やさしいおばあさんがまた現れて、なぜ娘が悲しんでいるかわかると、言いました。「元気をお出し。娘さん、やぶの中へ入って横になり、眠りなさい。私がすぐにお前の仕事をするからね。」おばあさんは一人になるとすぐ、池に少し触りました。すると蒸気が水から高くあがり、雲と混じり合いました。だんだんと池は空っぽになっていきました。日が沈む前に娘が目覚めてそこへ来てみると、泥の中でもがいている魚しか見えませんでした。娘は継母のところへ行き、仕事が終わったと見せました。「もっと早く終わってもよかったじゃないか。」と継母は言って、怒りで顔が蒼白になっていましたが、また新しいことを考えていました。

三日目の朝、継母は娘に言いました。「あそこの平原に城を建てておくれ。夕方までに準備するんだよ。」乙女はおびえて、「どうしてそんな大きな仕事が終えられるでしょう?」と言いました。「口答えは許さないよ。」と継母は叫びました。「穴だらけのスプーンで池を空っぽにできるんなら、城だって作れるだろ。今日城の持ち主になるんだからね。何か足りないものがあれば、どうなるか知ってるね。たとえ、台所や地下室のちっぽけなことでもだよ。」継母は娘を追い出しました。娘が谷に入ると、岩が積み重なってたくさんありました。それで娘の力では一番小さい岩ですら動かすことはできませんでした。娘は座って泣きました。それでもおばあさんが来て助けてくれないだろうかと望んでいました。

おばあさんはまもなくやってきました。娘をなぐさめて、「そこの木陰に横になって眠りなさい、私がじきに城を建ててやるからね。気に入るなら、お前が自分で住んでもいいんだよ。」と言いました。娘が行ってしまうと、おばあさんは灰色の岩に触れました。たくさんの岩が上がり一斉に動いて、巨人たちが壁を作るようにそこに立ち並び、その上に建物が上がっていきました。それはまるで無数の目に見えない手が働いて次々と石を積み上げていくようでした。地面から鈍く重い音がして、柱がいくつもひとりでに高く上がり、順序良く並んでいきました。

屋根にはかわらが順番におかれ、昼になったときには、もう塔の上に金の乙女が服をひらひらさせているように大きな風見鶏が回っていました。日が暮れかかるころには城の中が終わりつつありました。おばあさんがどうやったのかはわかりませんが、部屋の壁には絹とびろうどがはられ、刺繍された椅子がならび、大理石のテーブルのそばに飾りの豪華な安楽椅子があり、天井からは水晶のシャンデリアが吊るされて、滑らかな床に映っていました。金のかごに緑のオウムが入っていて、とてもきれいな声で鳴く珍しい鳥たちも同じでした。どこを見てもまるで王様がそこに住むかのように豪華になっていました。

娘が目覚めたときはちょうど日が沈むところでしたが、千の明かりが娘の顔を明るく照らしていました。娘は城に急ぎ、開いていた戸口から入りました。階段には赤い布が敷かれ、金の手すりは花の咲いた木々で囲まれていました。娘は華麗な部屋の有様を見ると、石になったようにたちすくみました。継母のことを思い出さなかったらどれだけ長くそこに立っていたかわかりません。「ああ」と娘は呟きました。「これでとうとうおかあさんも満足して、もう私をいじめないでくれるといいんだけど。」

娘は継母のところへ行き、城ができたと言いました。「すぐに引っ越すよ。」と継母は言って椅子から立ち上がりました。城に入ると、継母は目の前に手をかざすしかありませんでした。あらゆるものがきらめいてとてもまぶしかったのです。「ほらね」と継母は娘に言いました。「お前がこれをやるのはどんなに簡単だったかね。もっと難しい仕事をさせればよかったよ。」継母は全ての部屋に行ってみて、何か足りなかったり間違っているものが無いか隅々まで調べましたが、何も見つけられませんでした。「今度は下に行ってみるからね。」と継母は意地悪い目で娘を見ながら言いました。「まだ台所と地下室を調べなくちゃ。それで何か忘れていたら、お仕置きだからね、いいかい。」

しかし、かまどでは火が燃えているし、食べ物は鍋で煮えているし、壁には火挟みとシャベルがたてかけてあるし、ぴかぴか光っている真ちゅうの道具類が目に見えてすべて並べられていました。何も欠けているものはなく、石炭の箱や水桶までそろっていました。「地下室はどっちだ?」と継母は叫びました。「そこにワインの樽がたっぷりなかったら、ひどいことになるよ。」継母は自分で上げ戸を持ち上げ下りていきました。しかし、二歩も行かないうちに重い上げ戸が少ししか上がっていなかったので下へ戻って、バタンと落ちました。娘は悲鳴を聞いて急いで戸を持ち上げ助けに行こうとしました。しかし、継母は落ちてしまって、娘が行ってみると一番下で息絶えて床に倒れていました。

さあ、立派なお城は娘だけのものになりました。娘ははじめこの幸運にどうなじめばいいのかわかりませんでした。きれいな服がたくさんタンスにかかっていて、たくさんの箱は金銀、真珠や宝石でいっぱいで、叶えられない望みは何一つありませんでした。まもなく乙女が美しく裕福だという評判が世界中に広まりました。毎日求婚者が現れましたが、誰ひとり娘の気に入りませんでした。

とうとう王様の息子がやってきて、うまく娘の心を射止めることができました。娘は王子と婚約しました。城の庭に菩提樹がありました。ある日、その木の下で二人が一緒に座っていたとき、王子は娘に「家に帰って、僕たちの結婚を父に認めてもらってくる。この菩提樹の木の下で待っててくれないか。二、三時間で戻るよ。」と言いました。乙女は王子の左の頬にキスし、「いつも私を想っていてね。この頬に他の誰もキスさせないで。あなたが戻るまでここの菩提樹の下で待ってるわ。」と言いました。

乙女は日が沈むまで菩提樹の下で待っていましたが王子は戻りませんでした。娘は朝から晩まで三日間、王子を待って座っていましたが、空しく過ぎました。四日目もやはり戻って来なかったので、「きっと何か事故が起こったんだわ。あの人を探しに行こう。見つけるまでは戻らないわ。」と娘は言いました。娘は一番きれいなドレスを三枚まとめて包みました。一枚はキラキラする星が、もう一枚は銀色の月が、三枚目は金色の太陽が刺繍してありました。一握りの宝石をハンカチに入れて縛り、出かけました。娘はどこへ行ってもいいなずけのことを尋ねましたが、誰も見た人はいなく誰も何も知りませんでした。娘ははるか遠くまで世界を歩き回りましたが、見つけることはできませんでした。

とうとう娘はお百姓に牛飼いとして雇われ、石の下にドレスと宝石を埋めました。それで牛飼いとして牛の番をして暮らしましたが、とても悲しく愛する人が恋しくてたまりませんでした。娘には自分になれるように教え、手からえさを食べさせた子牛がいて、娘が「子牛や、子牛、私のそばに膝をおつき、王子が菩提樹の下で待ってる花嫁を忘れたように、お前の世話をしている娘を忘れないでね。」と言うと、子牛は膝まづき、娘はなでました。

娘が二、三年一人で悲しみにくれながら暮らしたあと、王様の娘が結婚をするという話が国じゅうに広まりました。その町へ行く道が乙女の住んでいる村を通っていて、あるとき、娘が群れを追い出しているとき、花婿が通りがかりました。その人は誇らしげに馬に乗っていて脇目もふりませんでしたが、娘はその人を見て自分の愛する人だとわかりました。それは鋭いナイフで心臓を貫かれたかのような思いでした。「ああ」と娘は言いました。「いつも私のことを想ってくれてると信じていたのに、あの人は私のことを忘れてしまったのね。」

次の日、花婿はまた道をやってきました。近くにくると、娘は子牛に言いました。「子牛や、子牛、私のそばに膝をおつき、王子が菩提樹の下で待ってる花嫁を忘れたように、お前の世話をしている娘を忘れないでね。」男はその声に気づき、見下ろして手綱を引いて馬をとめました。娘の顔をみつめ、何か思い出そうとするかのように目の前に手をやりましたが、じきに馬を進めて見えなくなりました。「ああ」と娘はいいました。「あの人はもう私がわからないのだわ。」それで悲しみはさらに大きなものとなりました。

このあとまもなく、王様の宮廷で三日間にわたる大宴会が開かれることになり、国じゅうの人たちが招かれました。「今こそ、最後のチャンスを試してみよう。」と乙女は考えました。夕方になると、宝物を埋めておいた石のところに行きました。金色の太陽のドレスをとり出しそれを着て、宝石をつけました。それから、ハンカチで隠していた髪を下ろしたので、長い巻き毛がたれさがりました。こうして町へでかけましたが、暗かったので誰にも気づかれませんでした。娘がこうこうと明かりのついた広間へ入ると、みんなが目をみはって後ろへさがりましたが、だれも娘が誰なのかわかりませんでした。王様の息子が娘を出迎えましたが、見覚えていませんでした。王子は娘をダンスに誘い、その美しさにとてもうっとりとして、もう一人の花嫁のことをもはや考えませんでした。宴会がおわると、娘は人ごみに紛れて姿を消し、夜明け前に村に急いで帰り、また牛飼いの服に着替えました。

次の晩、娘は銀色の月の服をとり出し、髪に宝石をちりばめた半月の飾りをつけました。宴会に現れると、みんなの目が娘に向けられましたが、王様の息子が急いで娘を出迎え、娘を想う気持ちでいっぱいでこの娘とだけ踊り、他の人はもう見向きもしませんでした。別れる前に、娘は最後の晩の宴会にも来るようにと王子に約束させられました。

三回目に現れたときは、娘は歩くたびにキラキラ光る星のドレスを着て、ヘアバンドとベルトには宝石が星のようにちりばめられていました。王子はもうずっと娘を待っていて、人をかき分けて近づいてきました。「君は誰なのか教えてくれ。」と王子は言いました。「僕はずっと前から君を知っていたような気がするんだ。」「お別れのとき私がしたことを覚えていらっしゃらないの?」そうして娘は王子に近づくと、左の頬にキスしました。すると途端に王子の目からうろこが落ちたように、本当の花嫁を見分けられました。「おいで」と王子が娘に言いました。「僕はもうここにいるつもりはない」王子は娘に手をさしのべて、馬車に連れて行きました。馬は、風が馬車にとりつけられていたかのように速く、魔法の城へ走っていきました。もう遠くから明かりのついた窓が輝いて見えました。菩提樹を走り過ぎると、無数のほたるがそのあたりに群れていて、木の枝が揺れ、香りを漂わせました。階段には花が咲き乱れ、部屋は珍しい鳥たちの歌がこだましていました。広間には宮廷じゅうの人々が集まり、花婿と本当の花嫁を結婚させるため、牧師が待っていました。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.