ENGLISH

The true bride

NEDERLANDS

De ware bruid


There was once on a time a girl who was young and beautiful, but she had lost her mother when she was quite a child, and her step-mother did all she could to make the girl's life wretched. Whenever this woman gave her anything to do, she worked at it indefatigably, and did everything that lay in her power. Still she could not touch the heart of the wicked woman by that; she was never satisfied; it was never enough. The harder the girl worked, the more work was put upon her, and all that the woman thought of was how to weigh her down with still heavier burdens, and make her life still more miserable.
One day she said to her, "Here are twelve pounds of feathers which thou must pick, and if they are not done this evening, thou mayst expect a good beating. Dost thou imagine thou art to idle away the whole day?" The poor girl sat down to the work, but tears ran down her cheeks as she did so, for she saw plainly enough that it was quite impossible to finish the work in one day. Whenever she had a little heap of feathers lying before her, and she sighed or smote her hands together in her anguish, they flew away, and she had to pick them out again, and begin her work anew. Then she put her elbows on the table, laid her face in her two hands, and cried, "Is there no one, then, on God's earth to have pity on me?" Then she heard a low voice which said, "Be comforted, my child, I have come to help thee." The maiden looked up, and an old woman was by her side. She took the girl kindly by the hand, and said, "Only tell me what is troubling thee." As she spoke so kindly, the girl told her of her miserable life, and how one burden after another was laid upon her, and she never could get to the end of the work which was given to her. "If I have not done these feathers by this evening, my step-mother will beat me; she has threatened she will, and I know she keeps her word." Her tears began to flow again, but the good old woman said, "Do not be afraid, my child; rest a while, and in the meantime I will look to thy work." The girl lay down on her bed, and soon fell asleep. The old woman seated herself at the table with the feathers, and how they did fly off the quills, which she scarcely touched with her withered hands! The twelve pounds were soon finished, and when the girl awoke, great snow-white heaps were lying, piled up, and everything in the room was neatly cleared away, but the old woman had vanished. The maiden thanked God, and sat still till evening came, when the step-mother came in and marvelled to see the work completed. "Just look, you awkward creature," said she, "what can be done when people are industrious; and why couldst thou not set about something else? There thou sittest with thy hands crossed." When she went out she said, "The creature is worth more than her salt. I must give her some work that is still harder."

Next morning she called the girl, and said, "There is a spoon for thee; with that thou must empty out for me the great pond which is beside the garden, and if it is not done by night, thou knowest what will happen." The girl took the spoon, and saw that it was full of holes; but even if it had not been, she never could have emptied the pond with it. She set to work at once, knelt down by the water, into which her tears were falling, and began to empty it. But the good old woman appeared again, and when she learnt the cause of her grief, she said, "Be of good cheer, my child. Go into the thicket and lie down and sleep; I will soon do thy work." As soon as the old woman was alone, she barely touched the pond, and a vapour rose up on high from the water, and mingled itself with the clouds. Gradually the pond was emptied, and when the maiden awoke before sunset and came thither, she saw nothing but the fishes which were struggling in the mud. She went to her step-mother, and showed her that the work was done. "It ought to have been done long before this," said she, and grew white with anger, but she meditated something new.

On the third morning she said to the girl, "Thou must build me a castle on the plain there, and it must be ready by the evening." The maiden was dismayed, and said, "How can I complete such a great work?" - "I will endure no opposition," screamed the step-mother. If thou canst empty a pond with a spoon that is full of holes, thou canst build a castle too. I will take possession of it this very day, and if anything is wanting, even if it be the most trifling thing in the kitchen or cellar, thou knowest what lies before thee!" She drove the girl out, and when she entered the valley, the rocks were there, piled up one above the other, and all her strength would not have enabled her even to move the very smallest of them. She sat down and wept, and still she hoped the old woman would help her. The old woman was not long in coming; she comforted her and said, "Lie down there in the shade and sleep, and I will soon build the castle for thee. If it would be a pleasure to thee, thou canst live in it thyself." When the maiden had gone away, the old woman touched the gray rocks. They began to rise, and immediately moved together as if giants had built the walls; and on these the building arose, and it seemed as if countless hands were working invisibly, and placing one stone upon another. There was a dull heavy noise from the ground; pillars arose of their own accord on high, and placed themselves in order near each other. The tiles laid themselves in order on the roof, and when noon-day came, the great weather-cock was already turning itself on the summit of the tower, like a golden figure of the Virgin with fluttering garments. The inside of the castle was being finished while evening was drawing near. How the old woman managed it, I know not; but the walls of the rooms were hung with silk and velvet, embroidered chairs were there, and richly ornamented arm-chairs by marble tables; crystal chandeliers hung down from the ceilings, and mirrored themselves in the smooth pavement; green parrots were there in gilt cages, and so were strange birds which sang most beautifully, and there was on all sides as much magnificence as if a king were going to live there. The sun was just setting when the girl awoke, and the brightness of a thousand lights flashed in her face. She hurried to the castle, and entered by the open door. The steps were spread with red cloth, and the golden balustrade beset with flowering trees. When she saw the splendour of the apartment, she stood as if turned to stone. Who knows how long she might have stood there if she had not remembered the step-mother? "Alas!" she said to herself, "if she could but be satisfied at last, and would give up making my life a misery to me." The girl went and told her that the castle was ready. "I will move into it at once," said she, and rose from her seat. When they entered the castle, she was forced to hold her hand before her eyes, the brilliancy of everything was so dazzling. "Thou seest," said she to the girl, "how easy it has been for thee to do this; I ought to have given thee something harder." She went through all the rooms, and examined every corner to see if anything was wanting or defective; but she could discover nothing. "Now we will go down below," said she, looking at the girl with malicious eyes. "The kitchen and the cellar still have to be examined, and if thou hast forgotten anything thou shalt not escape thy punishment." But the fire was burning on the hearth, and the meat was cooking in the pans, the tongs and shovel were leaning against the wall, and the shining brazen utensils all arranged in sight. Nothing was wanting, not even a coal-box and water-pail. "Which is the way to the cellar?" she cried. "If that is not abundantly filled, it shall go ill with thee." She herself raised up the trap-door and descended; but she had hardly made two steps before the heavy trap-door which was only laid back, fell down. The girl heard a scream, lifted up the door very quickly to go to her aid, but she had fallen down, and the girl found her lying lifeless at the bottom.

And now the magnificent castle belonged to the girl alone. She at first did not know how to reconcile herself to her good fortune. Beautiful dresses were hanging in the wardrobes, the chests were filled with gold or silver, or with pearls and jewels, and she never felt a desire that she was not able to gratify. And soon the fame of the beauty and riches of the maiden went over all the world. Wooers presented themselves daily, but none pleased her. At length the son of the King came and he knew how to touch her heart, and she betrothed herself to him. In the garden of the castle was a lime-tree, under which they were one day sitting together, when he said to her, "I will go home and obtain my father's consent to our marriage. I entreat thee to wait for me here under this lime-tree, I shall be back with thee in a few hours." The maiden kissed him on his left cheek, and said, "Keep true to me, and never let any one else kiss thee on this cheek. I will wait here under the lime-tree until thou returnest.

The maid stayed beneath the lime-tree until sunset, but he did not return. She sat three days from morning till evening, waiting for him, but in vain. As he still was not there by the fourth day, she said, "Some accident has assuredly befallen him. I will go out and seek him, and will not come back until I have found him." She packed up three of her most beautiful dresses, one embroidered with bright stars, the second with silver moons, the third with golden suns, tied up a handful of jewels in her handkerchief, and set out. She inquired everywhere for her betrothed, but no one had seen him; no one knew anything about him. Far and wide did she wander through the world, but she found him not. At last she hired herself to a farmer as a cow-herd, and buried her dresses and jewels beneath a stone.

And now she lived as a herdswoman, guarded her herd, and was very sad and full of longing for her beloved one; she had a little calf which she taught to know her, and fed it out of her own hand, and when she said,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
the little calf knelt down, and she stroked it.
And when she had lived for a couple of years alone and full of grief, a report was spread over all the land that the King's daughter was about to celebrate her marriage. The road to the town passed through the village where the maiden was living, and it came to pass that once when the maiden was driving out her herd, her bridegroom travelled by. He was sitting proudly on his horse, and never looked round, but when she saw him she recognized her beloved, and it was just as if a sharp knife had pierced her heart. "Alas!" said she, "I believed him true to me, but he has forgotten me."

Next day he again came along the road. When he was near her she said to the little calf,

"Little calf, little calf, kneel by my side,
And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,
As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him 'neath the lime-tree's shade."
When he was aware of the voice, he looked down and reined in his horse. He looked into the herd's face, and then put his hands before his eyes as if he were trying to remember something, but he soon rode onwards and was out of sight. "Alas!" said she, "he no longer knows me," and her grief was ever greater.
Soon after this a great festival three days long was to be held at the King's court, and the whole country was invited to it.

"Now will I try my last chance," thought the maiden, and when evening came she went to the stone under which she had buried her treasures. She took out the dress with the golden suns, put it on, and adorned herself with the jewels. She let down her hair, which she had concealed under a handkerchief, and it fell down in long curls about her, and thus she went into the town, and in the darkness was observed by no one. When she entered the brightly-lighted hall, every one started back in amazement, but no one knew who she was. The King's son went to meet her, but he did not recognize her. He led her out to dance, and was so enchanted with her beauty, that he thought no more of the other bride. When the feast was over, she vanished in the crowd, and hastened before daybreak to the village, where she once more put on her herd's dress.

Next evening she took out the dress with the silver moons, and put a half-moon made of precious stones in her hair. When she appeared at the festival, all eyes were turned upon her, but the King's son hastened to meet her, and filled with love for her, danced with her alone, and no longer so much as glanced at anyone else. Before she went away she was forced to promise him to come again to the festival on the last evening.

When she appeared for the third time, she wore the star-dress which sparkled at every step she took, and her hair-ribbon and girdle were starred with jewels. The prince had already been waiting for her for a long time, and forced his way up to her. "Do but tell who thou art," said he, "I feel just as if I had already known thee a long time." - "Dost thou not know what I did when thou leftest me?" Then she stepped up to him, and kissed him on his left cheek, and in a moment it was as if scales fell from his eyes, and he recognized the true bride. "Come," said he to her, "here I stay no longer," gave her his hand, and led her down to the carriage. The horses hurried away to the magic castle as if the wind had been harnessed to the carriage. The illuminated windows already shone in the distance. When they drove past the lime-tree, countless glow-worms were swarming about it. It shook its branches, and sent forth their fragrance. On the steps flowers were blooming, and the room echoed with the song of strange birds, but in the hall the entire court was assembled, and the priest was waiting to marry the bridegroom to the true bride.
Er was eens een jong meisje, ze was heel mooi, maar haar moeder was vroeg gestorven en haar stiefmoeder deed haar alle verdriet aan wat maar mogelijk was. Als ze haar werk opgaf, al was 't nog zo zwaar, dan begon ze er ijverig aan, en deed wat haar maar mogelijk was. Maar nooit kon ze 't hart van de slechte vrouw treffen, ze was altijd ontevreden en het was nooit genoeg. Hoe harder ze werkte, des te meer werd haar op de schouders gelegd, en het enige waar aan ze dacht, was, haar altijd meer op te dragen en haar het leven zo zuur te maken als maar mogelijk was.

Eens op een dag zei ze tegen haar: "Daar heb je twaalf pond veren. Daar moet je de schachten afhalen, en als je er vanavond niet mee klaar bent, dan krijg je een pak slaag. Dacht je dat je de hele dag kon luieren?" Het arme meisje ging aan het werk, maar tranen liepen over haar wangen, want ze zag wel, dat het onmogelijk was, met dit werk in één dag klaar te komen. Als ze een hoopje veren voor zich had liggen en ze zuchtte, of ze sloeg in haar angst haar handen ineen, dan stoven de veren uit elkaar, en ze moest ze weer uitzoeken om opnieuw te beginnen. Opeens zette ze haar beide ellebogen met een plof op tafel, borg haar gezicht in haar handen en riep: "Is er iemand op Gods aardbodem die medelijden heeft?" Toen hoorde ze een zachte stem, die zei: "Troost je, kindlief, ik ben gekomen om je te helpen." Het meisje keek op: een oude vrouw stond naast haar. Ze nam haar vriendelijk bij de hand en zei: "Vertel me maar wat je zo bedroeft." En toen ze dat zo hartelijk zei, vertelde het meisje haar van haar treurig leven, dat haar de ene last na de andere te dragen werd gegeven en dat ze met 't opgegeven werk niet meer klaar kon komen. "Als ik vanavond met die veren niet klaar ben, slaat mij stiefmoeder me, dat heeft ze gedreigd, en wat ze zegt, dat doet ze." Weer begonnen haar tranen te stromen, maar de goede oude vrouw zei: "Tob maar niet, rust nu eerst eens uit, dan zal ik het werk wel doen." Het meisje ging in bed liggen en viel al gauw in slaap. De oude vrouw ging aan tafel bij de veren zitten, roets, roets vlogen de schachten van de pennen af, en ze hoefde ze nauwelijks aan te raken met haar dorre hand. In korte tijd waren alle twaalf pond gedaan. Toen 't meisje weer wakker werd, lagen er grote witte hopen veren opgetorend, maar de oude vrouw was weg. Het meisje dankte God, en bleef rustig liggen, tot de avond kwam. Daar trad de stiefmoeder binnen en verbaasde zich over het werk dat af was. "Zie je nu wel, jij trol, wat een mens kan doen, als hij maar ijverig is? Had je niet wat meer kunnen doen? Jij zit er maar bij, hè, met je handen in je schoot." En toen ze wegging zei ze: "Dat stuk vee kan meer dan brood eten, ik moet haar een zwaardere taak opgeven."

De volgende morgen liet ze het meisje weer bij zich komen en zei: "Daar heb je een lepel; schep daar de grote vijver mee uit, die bij de tuin ligt. En wanneer je hem 's avonds niet helemaal leeg hebt, dan weetje, wat er opzit." Ze nam de lepel aan en zag dat het een schuimspaan was, en al was het een goede lepel geweest, ze had er die hele vijver nooit leeg mee gekregen. Ze begon meteen aan het werk, knielde bij het water – haar tranen vielen erin – en schepte. Maar de goede oude vrouw kwam er weer bij, en toen ze de oorzaak van haar verdriet hoorde, zei ze: "Kindlief, tob maar niet, ga jij maar in de struiken liggen en een beetje slapen, ik zal je werk wel doen." Toen de oude alleen was, deed ze niets anders, dan de vijver even aanraken; als een nevel steeg het water omhoog en ging op in de wolken. Langzamerhand werd de vijver leeg, en toen het meisje voor zonsondergang wakker werd en erbij kwam staan, zag ze niets meer dan dat de vissen in de modder lagen te spartelen. Ze ging toen naar haar stiefmoeder en liet haar zien dat het klaar was. "Je had er al lang klaar mee moeten zijn," zei ze en werd bleek van woede. Maar toen dacht ze weer wat anders uit.

De derde morgen zei ze tegen 't meisje: "Daar in de vlakte moest je me een mooi slot bouwen, en 's avonds moet het af zijn." Nu schrok 't meisje en zei: "Hoe kan ik nu zo'n groot werk afkrijgen?" - "Tegenspraak duld ik niet," schreeuwde de stiefmoeder. "Als jij met een schuimspaan een vijver kunt leegscheppen, dan kan je ook een slot bouwen. Ik wil er nog vandaag intrekken, en als er ook maar zoveel aan mankeert, al is het maar de kleinste kleinigheid in keuken of kelder, dan weet je, wat er op zit." Ze joeg haar weg, en toen 't meisje naar de aangeduide plek kwam, lagen daar rotsblokken door en over elkaar; met al haar kracht kon ze zelfs de kleinste niet bewegen. Toen ging ze weer zitten huilen, maar ze hoopte op de hulp van de goede oude vrouw. Niet lang liet die op zich wachten; ze kwam en troostte haar. "Ga jij maar in de schaduw liggen slapen, dat slot zal ik wel voor je maken. Als je het mooi vindt, mag je er zelf in wonen!" Het meisje ging weg, en dan raakte de oude de rotsen aan. Ze richtten zich op, kwamen naast elkaar te staan en verrezen of reuzen hen tot een muur hadden gebouwd; daarop verhief zich een gebouw, en 't was of talloze handen onzichtbaar bezig waren en steen op steen legden. De bodem dreunde. Grote zuilen stegen vanzelf omhoog en gingen naast elkaar in de rij staan. Op 't dak gingen de dakpannen naast elkaar liggen, en toen het middag was geworden, draaide de grote windvaan al als een jonge vrouw met waaiend gewaad op de torenspits, 's Avonds was alles klaar. Hoe de oude vrouw het klaar speelde, weet ik zelf niet, maar de wanden van de kamers waren behangen met zijde en fluweel, bont bewerkte stoelen stonden er en rijkversierde leunstoelen om marmeren tafels geschikt; kristallen luchters hingen aan de zolderingen en spiegelden zich in de gladde vloeren, groene papegaaien zaten in gouden kooien en ook vreemde vogels die prachtig zongen; overal was een pracht of er een koning moest wonen. Juist zou de zon ondergaan toen het meisje wakker werd; de glans van duizenden lichten straalde haar tegemoet. Met snelle passen liep ze erheen, en kwam door de geopende poort het slot binnen. De trap was met een rode loper belegd, en naast de gouden leuning stonden bloeiende struiken. Toen ze de prachtige kamers ontdekte, bleef ze als verstard staan. Wie weet hoe lang ze zo beduusd zou zijn blijven staan, als haar niet opeens de gedachte aan haar stiefmoeder te binnen was geschoten. "Ach," dacht ze, "als die nu eindelijk eens tevreden was en me het leven niet langer tot een kwelling zou maken." Ze ging naar haar toe om haar te zeggen dat het slot klaar was. "Ik wil er meteen in!" zei ze en stond van haar stoel op. Toen ze het slot binnenkwam, moest ze haar hand voor haar ogen houden, zo verblindde haar de glans. "Zie je nou wel," zei ze tegen het meisje, "hoe gemakkelijk dit voor je was; ik had je beter iets moeilijkers kunnen laten doen." Ze ging alle kamers door, snuffelde in alle hoeken, of er ook iets verkeerd was of ontbrak, maar vinden kon ze niets. "Nu zullen we eens beneden gaan kijken," zei ze en keek het meisje met boosaardige blik aan, "ik moet nog keuken en kelder nagaan, en als je wat vergeten hebt, zul je je straf niet ontgaan." Maar het vuur brandde op de plaat, in de pannen kookte het eten, tang en asschop stonden erbij en langs de wanden glom het koperen vaatwerk. "Waar is de ingang van de kelder?" riep ze, "als die niet rijk van wijn in 't vat is voorzien dan zal het slecht met je aflopen." Zelf hief ze de valdeur op en ging de trap af, maar nauwelijks was ze twee treden gedaald, of de zware valdeur die maar open stond, plofte neer. Het meisje hoorde een gil, hief de deur snel omhoog, om haar te hulp te komen, maar ze was naar beneden gevallen en ze vond haar dood op de grond. Nu was het prachtige slot helemaal alleen van het meisje. In het begin kon ze haar geluk nog niet op; prachtige kleren hingen in de kasten, de kisten waren met goud en zilver, of met parels en edelstenen gevuld, en er was geen enkele wens, die ze niet kon vervullen. Weldra ging er het gerucht door de hele wereld, hoe mooi en hoe rijk dat meisje wel was. Elke dag kwamen er vrijers aan, maar ze vond niemand aardig genoeg. Eindelijk kwam een koningszoon die haar hart wist te treffen, en ze verloofde zich met hem. In de tuin van het slot stond een groene linde, daar zaten ze op een dag vertrouwelijk bij elkaar, en toen zei hij tegen haar: "Nu ga ik naar huis om de toestemming voor ons trouwen te vragen aan mijn vader; nu vraag ik je om onder deze linde te wachten; het duurt maar weinige uren en dan ben ik terug." Het meisje gaf hem een kus op zijn linkerwang, en zei: "Blijf mij trouw, laat je door niemand anders op deze wang kussen. Ik zal onder deze linde wachten, tot je weer terugkomt."

Het meisje bleef onder de linde zitten, tot de zon was ondergegaan. Maar hij kwam niet terug. Ze zat er drie dagen, van de morgen tot de avond, en wachtte op hem, maar hij kwam niet meer terug. Toen hij er de vierde dag nog niet was, zei ze: "Hij heeft zeker een ongeluk gekregen; ik zal hem gaan zoeken en niet terugkomen, voor ik hem gevonden heb." Ze pakte drie van haar mooiste kleren bijeen; een met glanzende sterren geborduurd, het tweede met zilveren manen, het derde met gulden zonnen; dan bond ze een handvol edelstenen in een doekje en vertrok. Overal vroeg ze naar haar bruidegom, maar niemand had hem gezien, niemand wist iets van hem af. In wijde verten zwierf ze de wereld door, maar ze vond hem niet. Eindelijk verhuurde ze zich bij een boer als herderin, en verborg de kleren en edelstenen onder een steen.

Nu leefde ze als een herderin; ze hoedde haar kudde, was bedroefd en verlangde naar hem, die ze liefhad. – Nu had ze een kalfje dat ze aan zich had gewend, het at uit haar hand, en als ze zei:

"Kalfje, kalfje, kniel maar neer,
vergeet de herderin niet meer,
zoals de prins zijn bruid vergat,
die onder de groene linde zat."

dan knielde het kalfje neer en ze streelde het.

Toen ze zo een paar jaar in eenzaamheid een armoedig bestaan had geleid, verbreidde zich het gerucht, dat de dochter van de koning zou gaan trouwen. De weg naar de stad ging langs het dorp, waar 't meisje nu woonde, en 't gebeurde eens, toen ze juist haar kudde naar de weg dreef, dat de bruidegom langs trok. Hij zat trots op zijn paard, keek haar niet aan, maar toen zij hem zag, herkende ze haar liefste. Het was of er een scherp mes door haar hart sneed. "Ach," zei ze, "en ik dacht nog, dat hij mij trouw was gebleven: maar hij heeft me vergeten."

De volgende dag kwam hij weer langs. Toen hij in haar nabijheid was, zei zij tegen het kalfje:

"Kalfje, kalfje, kniel maar neer,
vergeet de herderin niet meer,
zoals de prins zijn bruid vergat,
die onder de groene linde zat."

Toen hij die stem hoorde, keek hij naar beneden en hield zijn paard in. Hij keek in 't gezicht, hield dan zijn hand voor zijn ogen, alsof hij zich iets te binnen wilde brengen, maar dan reed hij snel verder en was spoedig uit het oog verdwenen. "Ach," zuchtte zij, "hij kent me niet eens meer," en haar droefheid werd telkens groter.

Spoedig daarna zou er aan het hof van de koning een groot feest worden gegeven, dat drie dagen zou duren. Het hele land werd ervoor uitgenodigd. "Nu zal ik het laatste middel proberen," dacht het meisje en toen het avond werd, ging ze naar de steen waaronder ze haar schatten had verborgen. Ze haalde het gewaad met de gouden zonnen te voorschijn, ze deed het aan en versierde zich met edelstenen. Haar haar, dat ze onder een doek verborgen had, maakte ze los, en 't viel in lange krullen langs haar schouders. Zo liep ze naar de stad; in de duisternis werd ze door niemand opgemerkt. Toen ze in de hel verlichte zaal kwam, weken allen vol bewondering uiteen, maar niemand wist, wie ze was. De prins trad haar tegemoet, maar hij herkende haar niet. Hij voerde haar ten dans en was zo opgetogen over haar schoonheid, dat hij aan zijn bruid, – de andere bruid – niet eens meer dacht. Toen het feest ten einde liep, verdween ze in de mensenmenigte, en snelde voor 't aanbreken van de dag naar het dorp, waar ze haar herdersgewaad weer aandeed.

De volgende avond haalde ze het kleed met de zilveren manen te voorschijn, en stak een halve maan van diamanten in het haar. Toen ze zich op het feest vertoonde, wendden alle ogen zich naar haar. Maar de prins ging haar zelf tegemoet, en vol liefde voor haar vervuld, danste hij met haar alleen, en keek niemand anders meer aan. Voor ze wegging, moest ze hem beloven, de laatste avond nog eens op het feest te komen.

Toen ze voor de derde maal verscheen, had ze het sterrengewaad aan, dat bij elke beweging fonkelde, en haar haarband en gordel waren van edelstenen. De prins had al lang op haar gewacht en snelde naar haar toe. "Zeg mij, wie u bent," sprak hij, "het is me alsof ik u al sinds lang kende." - "Weetje niet meer," antwoordde zij, "wat ik deed, toen je afscheid van me nam?" En ze trad naar hem toe en kuste hem op de linkerwang: op dat ogenblik vielen hem de schellen van de ogen, en hij herkende zijn ware bruid. "Kom," zei hij tot haar, "hier kan ik niet langer blijven," en hij reikte haar de hand en bracht haar het rijtuig. Als was de wind er voorgespannen, zo ijlden de paarden naar het wonderkasteel. De verlichte vensters blonken al van ver. Toen ze langs de linde reden, danste daar een ongelooflijke menigte glimwormen; en ze schudden aan de takken en golven geur omgaven hen. Op de trap bloeiden de bloemen, uit de zalen weerklonk het lied van de uitheemse vogels, maar in de grote zaal stond het hele hof bijeen, de priester stond al te wachten en hij trouwde de bruidegom met de ware bruid.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.