ENGLISH

The sea-hare

日本語

あめふらし


There was once upon a time a princess, who, high under the battlements in her castle, had an apartment with twelve windows, which looked out in every possible direction, and when she climbed up to it and looked around her, she could inspect her whole kingdom. When she looked out of the first, her sight was more keen than that of any other human being; from the second she could see still better, from the third more distinctly still, and so it went on, until the twelfth, from which she saw everything above the earth and under the earth, and nothing at all could be kept secret from her. Moreover, as she was haughty, and would be subject to no one, but wished to keep the dominion for herself alone, she caused it to be proclaimed that no one should ever be her husband who could not conceal himself from her so effectually, that it should be quite impossible for her to find him. He who tried this, however, and was discovered by her, was to have his head struck off, and stuck on a post. Ninety-seven posts with the heads of dead men were already standing before the castle, and no one had come forward for a long time. The princess was delighted, and thought to herself, "Now I shall be free as long as I live." Then three brothers appeared before her, and announced to her that they were desirous of trying their luck. The eldest believed he would be quite safe if he crept into a lime-pit, but she saw him from the first window, made him come out, and had his head cut off. The second crept into the cellar of the palace, but she perceived him also from the first window, and his fate was sealed. His head was placed on the nine and ninetieth post. Then the youngest came to her and entreated her to give him a day for consideration, and also to be so gracious as to overlook it if she should happen to discover him twice, but if he failed the third time, he would look on his life as over. As he was so handsome, and begged so earnestly, she said, "Yes, I will grant thee that, but thou wilt not succeed."
Next day he meditated for a long time how he should hide himself, but all in vain. Then he seized his gun and went out hunting. He saw a raven, took a good aim at him, and was just going to fire, when the bird cried, "Don't shoot; I will make it worth thy while not." He put his gun down, went on, and came to a lake where he surprised a large fish which had come up from the depths below to the surface of the water. When he had aimed at it, the fish cried, "Don't shoot, and I will make it worth thy while." He allowed it to dive down again, went onwards, and met a fox which was lame. He fired and missed it, and the fox cried, "You had much better come here and draw the thorn out of my foot for me." He did this; but then he wanted to kill the fox and skin it, the fox said, "Stop, and I will make it worth thy while." The youth let him go, and then as it was evening, returned home.

Next day he was to hide himself; but howsoever much he puzzled his brains over it, he did not know where. He went into the forest to the raven and said, "I let thee live on, so now tell me where I am to hide myself, so that the King's daughter shall not see me." The raven hung his head and thought it over for a longtime. At length he croaked, "I have it." He fetched an egg out of his nest, cut it into two parts, and shut the youth inside it; then made it whole again, and seated himself on it. When the King's daughter went to the first window she could not discover him, nor could she from the others, and she began to be uneasy, but from the eleventh she saw him. She ordered the raven to be shot, and the egg to be brought and broken, and the youth was forced to come out. She said, "For once thou art excused, but if thou dost not do better than this, thou art lost!"

Next day he went to the lake, called the fish to him and said, "I suffered thee to live, now tell me where to hide myself so that the King's daughter may not see me." The fish thought for a while, and at last cried, "I have it! I will shut thee up in my stomach." He swallowed him, and went down to the bottom of the lake. The King's daughter looked through her windows, and even from the eleventh did not see him, and was alarmed; but at length from the twelfth she saw him. She ordered the fish to be caught and killed, and then the youth appeared. Every one can imagine what a state of mind he was in. She said, "Twice thou art forgiven, but be sure that thy head will be set on the hundredth post."

On the last day, he went with a heavy heart into the country, and met the fox. "Thou knowest how to find all kinds of hiding-places," said he; "I let thee live, now advise me where I shall hide myself so that the King's daughter shall not discover me." - "That's a hard task," answered the fox, looking very thoughtful. At length he cried, "I have it!" and went with him to a spring, dipped himself in it, and came out as a stall-keeper in the market, and dealer in animals. The youth had to dip himself in the water also, and was changed into a small sea-hare. The merchant went into the town, and showed the pretty little animal, and many persons gathered together to see it. At length the King's daughter came likewise, and as she liked it very much, she bought it, and gave the merchant a good deal of money for it. Before he gave it over to her, he said to it, "When the King's daughter goes to the window, creep quickly under the braids of he hair." And now the time arrived when she was to search for him. She went to one window after another in turn, from the first to the eleventh, and did not see him. When she did not see him from the twelfth either, she was full of anxiety and anger, and shut it down with such violence that the glass in every window shivered into a thousand pieces, and the whole castle shook.

She went back and felt the sea-hare beneath the braids of her hair. Then she seized it, and threw it on the ground exclaiming, "Away with thee, get out of my sight!" It ran to the merchant, and both of them hurried to the spring, wherein they plunged, and received back their true forms. The youth thanked the fox, and said, "The raven and the fish are idiots compared with thee; thou knowest the right tune to play, there is no denying that!"

The youth went straight to the palace. The princess was already expecting him, and accommodated herself to her destiny. The wedding was solemnized, and now he was king, and lord of all the kingdom. He never told her where he had concealed himself for the third time, and who had helped him, so she believed that he had done everything by his own skill, and she had a great respect for him, for she thought to herself, "He is able to do more than I."
昔、王女がいました。この王女にはお城の胸壁のすぐ下に12の窓がある部屋が一つあり、あらゆる方角を見わたせました。王女はそこに上り、周りを見まわすと国じゅうを視ることができました。第一の窓から見ると他の人間より視力が増し、第二の窓からはもっとよく見え、第三の窓からはもっとはっきり見え、と12番目の窓までそんな風に続きました。それで12番目の窓からは地の上でも下でも何でも見え、王女に見通せないものはなにもありませんでした。

さらに王女は傲慢で誰にも従わずに自分だけで国を治めていきたいと思っていました。王女は、自分からうまく隠れることができ、自分が見つけることが出来ない人でなければ誰も自分の夫としない、ただし、これに挑戦し王女に発見された場合その人は首を切られさらし首にされる、というお触れを出させました。死人の頭ののった97本の棒がもうお城の前に立っていて、長い間誰も申し出てきていませんでした。

王女は喜んで、(これで生きてる間自由でいられるわ)と心密かに思いました。すると三人の兄弟が前に現れ、運を試したい、と王女に申し出ました。一番上の兄は石灰を掘る坑に入り込めば無事だろうと信じていましたが、王女は第一の窓からこの男が見え、出てこさせて、首を切らせました。二番目の兄は宮殿の地下室に隠れましたが、王女はこの兄も第一の窓から見つけ、この兄の運が尽きて、その頭は99番目の棒にさらされました。すると一番下の弟がやってきて、一日考える日をください、もし王女様が見つけることがあっても二回まではどうか見逃していただきたいのです、三回目に失敗してみつかったら、そのときは命が終わったものとみなしてあきらめますから、とお願いしました。この男がとてもハンサムでとても真剣に頼んだので、王女は、「ええ、認めてあげます、でもうまくいかないでしょうね」と言いました。

次の日、どう隠れようかと長い間考えてみましたが、いい知恵が浮かびませんでした。それで銃をとり狩りにでかけました。カラスをみつけて、よく狙いをつけ、撃とうとした時、カラスが叫びました。「撃たないで。お返しはしますから。」若者は銃を下ろし進んでいきました。すると湖に着き、下の深みから水面に出てきていた大きな魚はびっくりしました。若者が狙いをつけると、魚は叫びました。「撃たないで。このお返しはしますから。」若者は魚にまたもぐっていかせて、ずんずん進んでいきました。すると足をひきずった狐にでくわしました。若者は撃ちましたがあたりませんでした。すると狐が「それよりもここに来て私の足からとげを抜いてください」と叫びました。若者はとげを抜いてやりましたが、狐を殺して皮を剥ごうとしたとき、狐は「止めてください、このお返しはしますから。」と言いました。若者は狐を逃がしてやり、もうその時は日が暮れてきたので家に戻りました。

次の日は隠れることになっていましたが、どんなに頭を悩ましてもどこに隠れたらいいのかわかりませんでした。若者は森のカラスのところに行き、「私はお前を生かしておいた。だから今度は王様の娘に見えないようにどこに隠れたらいいか教えてくれ。」と言いました。

カラスは頭を垂れしばらく考えていましたが、とうとうカアと叫んで、「ここがいい」と言いました。カラスは自分の巣から卵を一個とって二つに分けると、その中に若者を閉じ込め卵を元通りにして自分がその上に座りました。王様の娘は第一の窓に行くと若者をみつけられませんでした。他の窓からも見つけられなくて、王女はだんだん不安になってきました。しかし、11番目の窓から見つけました。王女はカラスを撃ち殺し、卵を持って来て壊すよう命じました。それで若者は出てくるしかありませんでした。王女は「一回目を許します。だけどもっとうまくやらないと、あなたはお終いですよ。」と言いました。

次の日若者は湖に行き魚を呼び寄せて、「私はわざわざお前を生かしてやった。今度は、王様の娘に見えないようにどこに隠れたらよいか教えてくれ。」と言いました。魚はしばらく考えていましたが、しまいに叫びました。「ここがいい。あなたを私のお腹に閉じ込めましょう。」魚は若者を飲み込み、湖の底に下りていきました。王様の娘は次々と窓から見ていって、11番目の窓からでも若者をみつけられなかったのでとても心配になりました。しかしとうとう12番目の窓から見つけました。王女は魚を捕まえ殺すよう命じました。すると若者が現れました。若者がどんな気持ちだったか容易に想像できるでしょう。王女は「これで許すのは2回目です。だけどきっとあなたの首が百本目の棒に置かれるでしょうね。」と言いました。

最後の日に、若者は心重く野原へ行き、狐に会いました。「お前はあらゆる隠れ場所の探し方を知っているよな。」と若者は言いました。「私はお前を生かしておいた。さあ今度は、王様の娘が私を見つけないようにどこに隠れたらよいか教えてくれ。」「う~ん、難しいね。」と狐はとても考え込んで答えました。とうとう狐は「ここがいい。」と叫び、若者と一緒に泉に行き、そこにもぐると、動物を扱う市場の露天商になって出てきました。若者も水にもぐらされ、小さなアメフラシに変えられました。商人は町に行き、その小さな動物をみせると大勢の人たちがそれを見るために集まりました。とうとう王様の娘もやってきて、それがとても気に入ったので商人にたくさんお金を渡して買いました。アメフラシを王女に渡す前に、狐はアメフラシに言いました。「王様の娘が窓に行ったら、素早く王女の編んだ髪の下に隠れなさい。」

さあいよいよ、王女が若者を探す時がきました。王女は次々と第一の窓から第十一の窓まで順番に行きましたが、若者を見つけませんでした。王女は第十二の窓からも若者を見つけなかった時、とても心配になり怒りました。それでとても荒々しく窓を閉めたので、どの窓のガラスも震えてこなごなに壊れ、城中が揺れました。王女は窓から戻り、イライラして手を編んだ髪の下にやるとアメフラシに触れました。それで、王女はそれをつかみ、「あっちへおいき、失せろ!」と叫んで床に投げつけました。アメフラシは商人のところに走っていき、二人とも泉に急ぐと、そこにとび込んで本当の姿に戻りました。若者は狐にお礼を言い、「カラスと魚はお前に比べると間抜けだな。お前は本当によく知っているよ。それは間違いないな。」と言いました。

若者はまっすぐ宮殿へ行きました。王女はもう若者を待っていて自分の運命に従いました。結婚式がおこなわれ、若者は王様になり、国全体の支配者になりました。自分が三回目に何に隠れたか、誰が手助けしたかはお后に決して話しませんでした。それでお后は、若者が自分の力だけで全部やったのだと信じて若者をとても尊敬しました。というのはお后は、この人は私より力が上だ、と心密かに思ったからです。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.