ENGLISH

The master-thief

日本語

どろぼうの名人


One day an old man and his wife were sitting in front of a miserable house resting a while from their work. Suddenly a splendid carriage with four black horses came driving up, and a richly-dressed man descended from it. The peasant stood up, went to the great man, and asked what he wanted, and in what way he could be useful to him? The stranger stretched out his hand to the old man, and said, "I want nothing but to enjoy for once a country dish; cook me some potatoes, in the way you always have them, and then I will sit down at your table and eat them with pleasure." The peasant smiled and said, "You are a count or a prince, or perhaps even a duke; noble gentlemen often have such fancies, but you shall have your wish." The wife went into the kitchen, and began to wash and rub the potatoes, and to make them into balls, as they are eaten by the country-folks. Whilst she was busy with this work, the peasant said to the stranger, "Come into my garden with me for a while, I have still something to do there." He had dug some holes in the garden, and now wanted to plant some trees in them. "Have you no children," asked the stranger, "who could help you with your work?" - "No," answered the peasant, "I had a son, it is true, but it is long since he went out into the world. He was a ne'er-do-well; sharp, and knowing, but he would learn nothing and was full of bad tricks, at last he ran away from me, and since then I have heard nothing of him."
The old man took a young tree, put it in a hole, drove in a post beside it, and when he had shovelled in some earth and had trampled it firmly down, he tied the stem of the tree above, below, and in the middle, fast to the post by a rope of straw. "But tell me," said the stranger, "why you don't tie that crooked knotted tree, which is lying in the corner there, bent down almost to the ground, to a post also that it may grow straight, as well as these?" The old man smiled and said, "Sir, you speak according to your knowledge, it is easy to see that you are not familiar with gardening. That tree there is old, and mis-shapen, no one can make it straight now. Trees must be trained while they are young." - "That is how it was with your son," said the stranger, "if you had trained him while he was still young, he would not have run away; now he too must have grown hard and mis-shapen." - "Truly it is a long time since he went away," replied the old man, "he must have changed." - "Would you know him again if he were to come to you?" asked the stranger. "Hardly by his face," replied the peasant, "but he has a mark about him, a birth-mark on his shoulder, that looks like a bean." When he had said that the stranger pulled off his coat, bared his shoulder, and showed the peasant the bean. "Good God!" cried the old man, "Thou art really my son!" and love for his child stirred in his heart. "But," he added, "how canst thou be my son, thou hast become a great lord and livest in wealth and luxury? How hast thou contrived to do that?" - "Ah, father," answered the son, "the young tree was bound to no post and has grown crooked, now it is too old, it will never be straight again. How have I got all that? I have become a thief, but do not be alarmed, I am a master-thief. For me there are neither locks nor bolts, whatsoever I desire is mine. Do not imagine that I steal like a common thief, I only take some of the superfluity of the rich. Poor people are safe, I would rather give to them than take anything from them. It is the same with anything which I can have without trouble, cunning and dexterity I never touch it." - "Alas, my son," said the father, "it still does not please me, a thief is still a thief, I tell thee it will end badly." He took him to his mother, and when she heard that was her son, she wept for joy, but when he told her that he had become a master-thief, two streams flowed down over her face. At length she said, "Even if he has become a thief, he is still my son, and my eyes have beheld him once more." They sat down to table, and once again he ate with his parents the wretched food which he had not eaten for so long. The father said, "If our Lord, the count up there in the castle, learns who thou art, and what trade thou followest, he will not take thee in his arms and cradle thee in them as he did when he held thee at the font, but will cause thee to swing from a halter." - "Be easy, father, he will do me no harm, for I understand my trade. I will go to him myself this very day." When evening drew near, the master-thief seated himself in his carriage, and drove to the castle. The count received him civilly, for he took him for a distinguished man. When, however, the stranger made himself known, the count turned pale and was quite silent for some time. At length he said, "Thou art my godson, and on that account mercy shall take the place of justice, and I will deal leniently with thee. Since thou pridest thyself on being a master-thief, I will put thy art to the proof, but if thou dost not stand the test, thou must marry the rope-maker's daughter, and the croaking of the raven must be thy music on the occasion." - "Lord count," answered the master-thief, "Think of three things, as difficult as you like, and if I do not perform your tasks, do with me what you will." The count reflected for some minutes, and then said, "Well, then, in the first place, thou shalt steal the horse I keep for my own riding, out of the stable; in the next, thou shalt steal the sheet from beneath the bodies of my wife and myself when we are asleep, without our observing it, and the wedding-ring of my wife as well; thirdly and lastly, thou shalt steal away out of the church, the parson and clerk. Mark what I am saying, for thy life depends on it."

The master-thief went to the nearest town; there he bought the clothes of an old peasant woman, and put them on. Then he stained his face brown, and painted wrinkles on it as well, so that no one could have recognized him. Then he filled a small cask with old Hungary wine in which was mixed a powerful sleeping-drink. He put the cask in a basket, which he took on his back, and walked with slow and tottering steps to the count's castle. It was already dark when he arrived. He sat down on a stone in the court-yard and began to cough, like an asthmatic old woman, and to rub his hands as if he were cold. In front of the door of the stable some soldiers were lying round a fire; one of them observed the woman, and called out to her, "Come nearer, old mother, and warm thyself beside us. After all, thou hast no bed for the night, and must take one where thou canst find it." The old woman tottered up to them, begged them to lift the basket from her back, and sat down beside them at the fire. "What hast thou got in thy little cask, old lady?" asked one. "A good mouthful of wine," she answered. "I live by trade, for money and fair words I am quite ready to let you have a glass." - "Let us have it here, then," said the soldier, and when he had tasted one glass he said, "When wine is good, I like another glass," and had another poured out for himself, and the rest followed his example. "Hallo, comrades," cried one of them to those who were in the stable, "here is an old goody who has wine that is as old as herself; take a draught, it will warm your stomachs far better than our fire." The old woman carried her cask into the stable. One of the soldiers had seated himself on the saddled riding-horse, another held its bridle in his hand, a third had laid hold of its tail. She poured out as much as they wanted until the spring ran dry. It was not long before the bridle fell from the hand of the one, and he fell down and began to snore, the other left hold of the tail, lay down and snored still louder. The one who was sitting in the saddle, did remain sitting, but bent his head almost down to the horse's neck, and slept and blew with his mouth like the bellows of a forge. The soldiers outside had already been asleep for a long time, and were lying on the ground motionless, as if dead. When the master-thief saw that he had succeeded, he gave the first a rope in his hand instead of the bridle, and the other who had been holding the tail, a wisp of straw, but what was he to do with the one who was sitting on the horse's back? He did not want to throw him down, for he might have awakened and have uttered a cry. He had a good idea, he unbuckled the girths of the saddle, tied a couple of ropes which were hanging to a ring on the wall fast to the saddle, and drew the sleeping rider up into the air on it, then he twisted the rope round the posts, and made it fast. He soon unloosed the horse from the chain, but if he had ridden over the stony pavement of the yard they would have heard the noise in the castle. So he wrapped the horse's hoofs in old rags, led him carefully out, leapt upon him, and galloped off.

When day broke, the master galloped to the castle on the stolen horse. The count had just got up, and was looking out of the window. "Good morning, Sir Count," he cried to him, "here is the horse, which I have got safely out of the stable! Just look, how beautifully your soldiers are lying there sleeping; and if you will but go into the stable, you will see how comfortable your watchers have made it for themselves." The count could not help laughing, then he said, "For once thou hast succeeded, but things won't go so well the second time, and I warn thee that if thou comest before me as a thief, I will handle thee as I would a thief." When the countess went to bed that night, she closed her hand with the wedding-ring tightly together, and the count said, "All the doors are locked and bolted, I will keep awake and wait for the thief, but if he gets in by the window, I will shoot him." The master-thief, however, went in the dark to the gallows, cut a poor sinner who was hanging there down from the halter, and carried him on his back to the castle. Then he set a ladder up to the bedroom, put the dead body on his shoulders, and began to climb up. When he had got so high that the head of the dead man showed at the window, the count, who was watching in his bed, fired a pistol at him, and immediately the master let the poor sinner fall down, and hid himself in one corner. The night was sufficiently lighted by the moon, for the master to see distinctly how the count got out of the window on to the ladder, came down, carried the dead body into the garden, and began to dig a hole in which to lay it. "Now," thought the thief, "the favourable moment has come," stole nimbly out of his corner, and climbed up the ladder straight into the countess's bedroom. "Dear wife," he began in the count's voice, "the thief is dead, but, after all, he is my godson, and has been more of a scape-grace than a villain. I will not put him to open shame; besides, I am sorry for the parents. I will bury him myself before daybreak, in the garden that the thing may not be known, so give me the sheet, I will wrap up the body in it, and bury him as a dog burries things by scratching." The countess gave him the sheet. "I tell you what," continued the thief, "I have a fit of magnanimity on me, give me the ring too, -- the unhappy man risked his life for it, so he may take it with him into his grave." She would not gainsay the count, and although she did it unwillingly she drew the ring from her finger, and gave it to him. The thief made off with both these things, and reached home safely before the count in the garden had finished his work of burying.

What a long face the count did pull when the master came next morning, and brought him the sheet and the ring. "Art thou a wizard?" said he, "Who has fetched thee out of the grave in which I myself laid thee, and brought thee to life again?" - "You did not bury me," said the thief, "but the poor sinner on the gallows," and he told him exactly how everything had happened, and the count was forced to own to him that he was a clever, crafty thief. "But thou hast not reached the end yet," he added, "thou hast still to perform the third task, and if thou dost not succeed in that, all is of no use." The master smiled and returned no answer. When night had fallen he went with a long sack on his back, a bundle under his arms, and a lantern in his hand to the village-church. In the sack he had some crabs, and in the bundle short wax-candles. He sat down in the churchyard, took out a crab, and stuck a wax-candle on his back. Then he lighted the little light, put the crab on the ground, and let it creep about. He took a second out of the sack, and treated it in the same way, and so on until the last was out of the sack. Hereupon he put on a long black garment that looked like a monk's cowl, and stuck a gray beard on his chin. When at last he was quite unrecognizable, he took the sack in which the crabs had been, went into the church, and ascended the pulpit. The clock in the tower was just striking twelve; when the last stroke had sounded, he cried with a loud and piercing voice, "Hearken, sinful men, the end of all things has come! The last day is at hand! Hearken! Hearken! Whosoever wishes to go to heaven with me must creep into the sack. I am Peter, who opens and shuts the gate of heaven. Behold how the dead outside there in the churchyard, are wandering about collecting their bones. Come, come, and creep into the sack; the world is about to be destroyed!" The cry echoed through the whole village. The parson and clerk who lived nearest to the church, heard it first, and when they saw the lights which were moving about the churchyard, they observed that something unusual was going on, and went into the church. They listened to the sermon for a while, and then the clerk nudged the parson and said, "It would not be amiss if we were to use the opportunity together, and before the dawning of the last day, find an easy way of getting to heaven." - "To tell the truth," answered the parson, "that is what I myself have been thinking, so if you are inclined, we will set out on our way." - "Yes," answered the clerk, "but you, the pastor, have the precedence, I will follow." So the parson went first, and ascended the pulpit where the master opened his sack. The parson crept in first, and then the clerk. The master immediately tied up the sack tightly, seized it by the middle, and dragged it down the pulpit-steps, and whenever the heads of the two fools bumped against the steps, he cried, "We are going over the mountains." Then he drew them through the village in the same way, and when they were passing through puddles, he cried, "Now we are going through wet clouds." And when at last he was dragging them up the steps of the castle, he cried, "Now we are on the steps of heaven, and will soon be in the outer court." When he had got to the top, he pushed the sack into the pigeon-house, and when the pigeons fluttered about, he said, "Hark how glad the angels are, and how they are flapping their wings!" Then he bolted the door upon them, and went away.

Next morning he went to the count, and told him that he had performed the third task also, and had carried the parson and clerk out of the church. "Where hast thou left them?" asked the lord. "They are lying upstairs in a sack in the pigeon-house, and imagine that they are in heaven." The count went up himself, and convinced himself that the master had told the truth. When he had delivered the parson and clerk from their captivity, he said, "Thou art an arch-thief, and hast won thy wager. For once thou escapest with a whole skin, but see that thou leavest my land, for if ever thou settest foot on it again, thou may'st count on thy elevation to the gallows." The arch-thief took leave of his parents, once more went forth into the wide world, and no one has ever heard of him since.
ある日、年とった男とおかみさんが仕事の手をしばらく休めて、みすぼらしい家の前で座っていました。突然、黒馬の四頭立ての豪華な馬車が乗りつけてきて、立派な身なりの男が馬車から降りました。お百姓は立ち上がり、紳士の方へ行くと、どんな御用ですか、何をしたらよろしいでしょうか、と尋ねました。見知らぬ紳士は老人に手をさし出して、言いました。「ただ一度田舎料理を食べてみたいだけですよ。あなた方がいつもしているようにじゃがいもを料理してください。そうしたら食卓に座り喜んで食べますので。」
お百姓は笑顔で言いました。「あなたは伯爵さまか侯爵さまか、それとも公爵さまでしょうかね。高貴な殿方はよくそんなことをしたがりますね。でもお望み通りにしてさしあげましょう。」おかみさんはそれから台所へ行ってジャガイモを洗ってこすり始め、田舎の人たちが食べているように団子にし始めました。
おかみさんがせっせとこの仕事をしている間に、お百姓は見知らぬ人に、「しばらく一緒に庭にいらしてください。まだそこでやることがありますので。」と言いました。お百姓は庭にいくつか穴を掘ってあり、今度はそこに木を植えようとしていました。
「子供はいないんですか?」と見知らぬ人は尋ねました。「あなたの仕事を手伝ってくれるような?」
「ええ、いません。」とお百姓は答えました。「息子が一人いましたよ、確かにね。でもずっと前に世間に出ていったきりです。ろくでなしでした。利口でもの知りでしたが、何も習い覚えようとしないで悪さばかりしていました。とうとう家出してしまい、それからは息子のことを聞いたことはありません。」年よりは若木をとり、穴に入れ、そのそばに棒を打ちこみました。シャベルで土を入れ、しっかり踏み固めると、藁の縄で棒に木の幹を上下、真ん中としっかり結わえつけました。

「だけど、教えてください」と見知らぬ人は言いました。「どうしてあの曲がってこぶのある木も、これらの木とおなじように、まっすぐ伸びるように棒に結わえないんですか?ほら、あそこのすみに地面に届きそうなくらい垂れている木ですよ。」
年よりは笑って言いました。「よくご存知ないからそうおっしゃるんです。だんなはあまり園芸に詳しくないとよくわかりますよ。あの木は古く、いびつです。もうだれもまっすぐにできやしません。若木のうちに仕込まなくちゃいけないんですよ。」
「息子さんの場合もそういうことなんですね。」と見知らぬ人は言いました。「まだ若いうちに息子さんをきちんと教えていたら、家出しなかったでしょう。もう息子さんも固くいびつになってしまったにちがいありませんね。」
「そうです。家出してからもうだいぶ経ちます。」と年よりは答えました。「変わってしまったにちがいありません。」「もし息子さんがあなたのところにきたとして、わかりますか?」「顔を見ただけでは無理でしょう。ただ体に印がありましてね。肩に豆のようなあざがあるんです。」年寄りがそう言った時、見知らぬ人は上着を脱いで、肩を出しお百姓に豆を見せました。「なんとまあ」と年よりは叫びました。「本当に私の息子だ。」そして子供を愛する気持ちが心に湧いてきました。
「だけど」と年よりは付け加えました。「いったいお前がどうして私の息子なんだ?お前は大しただんなになって金がありぜいたくに暮らしている。どうしてそうすることができたんだ?」
「ああ、お父さん」と息子は答えました。「若木は棒に結わえられなくて曲がってしまいました。もう年をとり過ぎていて、まっすぐにはなりません。僕がどうしてこれだけ手に入れたのか?僕は泥棒になりました。だけど驚かないでください。僕は泥棒の名人なんです。僕にとって錠もかんぬきもありません。望むものは何でも僕のものです。僕が普通の泥棒みたいに盗むと思わないでください。

僕は金持ちの有り余った分からとるだけです。貧しい人たちは無事です。貧しい人たちからは盗むというよりむしろめぐんでやりたいですから。骨を折らないで、知恵を使わず、器用さも要らないようなものも同じです。そんなのは盗みません。」
「ああ、息子よ」と父親は言いました。「それでも気に入らないよ、泥棒はやはり泥棒だ。ろくなことにならないだろうよ。」父親は息子を母親にところに連れていきました。それが息子だと聞くと、母親は泣いて喜びました。父親が息子は泥棒名人になったというと、二筋の涙が母親の頬を伝って流れました。やがて、母親は「泥棒になってもやはり息子よ。また息子に会えてよかったわ。」と言いました。三人は食卓に座り、息子は両親と一緒にずっと食べなかったまずい食べ物をもう一度食べました。父親が、「もしお城にいらっしゃる領主の伯爵さまが、お前が誰で、どんな仕事をしているか知ったら、洗礼盤でお前を抱いたように腕に抱いて揺らしてはくれないだろうよ。きっとお前を首吊り綱から吊るさせるだろう。」と言いました。「安心して、お父さん。伯爵は僕に何もしないよ。僕は自分の仕事をわかっていますから。今日自分から伯爵のところへいってきます。」

日が暮れる頃、泥棒名人は馬車にのり、城にのりつけました。伯爵は男を礼儀正しく迎えました。というのは身分の高い人だと思ったからです。ところが見知らぬ人が正体を明かすと、伯爵は青ざめ、しばらく黙りこんでいました。とうとう伯爵は言いました。「お前はわしの名付け子だ。それゆえ、大目にみて寛大に扱うことにしよう。お前は泥棒名人と誇っているのだから、お前の腕を試してみよう。だが、失敗すればお前は綱屋の娘と結婚し、カラスの鳴き声が結婚式の音楽とならねばならぬぞ。」「伯爵さま」と泥棒名人は答えました。「お望みの難しい問題を三つお出しください。もしその課題をやりおおせなかったら、なんなりと私をお好きなようになさってください。」伯爵はしばらく考えて、やがて言いました。「それじゃ、まず、わしの乗る馬を馬小屋から盗んでもらいたい。次に妻とわしが眠っているとき体の下からシーツを盗んでもらおう。もちろんわしらが気づかないうちにだぞ。それから妻の結婚指輪もな。三番目に、これが最後だが、教会から牧師と下働きを盗み出してこい。わしが言ったことをよく覚えておけ。お前の命がかかっているのだからな。」

泥棒名人は近くの町へ行き、百姓のおばあさんの服を買ってそれを着ました。それから顔を茶色に塗り、同じように皺も作ったので誰も泥棒名人だとわからなくなりました。それから古いハンガリーワインを小さな樽に入れ、強い眠り薬と混ぜました。そして、かごに樽を入れ背負って、伯爵のお城にゆっくりよろよろとした足取りで歩いていきました。着いた時はもう暗くなっていました。名人は中庭の石の上に腰をおろし、ぜんそくもちのおばあさんのように咳をし、寒い振りをして手をこすり始めました。馬小屋の戸口の前に兵士が何人か火を囲んでいて、そのうちのひとりがおばあさんを見て、呼びかけました。「おばあさん、こっちへ来いよ。おれたちのそばで暖まりなよ。どうせ、泊るところがなくて、どこでも寝なくちゃいけないんだろ。」おばあさんはよろよろと近づいていき、背中からかごを下ろしてくれるよう頼むと、火のそばに兵士と一緒に腰を下ろしました。

「ばあさん、樽に何が入ってるんだ?」と一人が尋ねました。「良いワインだよ」とおばあさんは答えました。「これで暮らしてるんだよ。お金と嬉しい言葉をくれれば一杯飲ませてもいいよ。」「じゃあここで飲ませてくれよ。」とその兵士は言って、一杯飲むと、「うまいワインの時は、もう一杯飲みたくなる。」と言って、もう一杯注がせませた。他の兵士たちもこの兵士にならいました。「おーい、みんな」と一人が馬小屋の中にいる人たちに呼びかけました。「ここにばあさんがいるんだ。自分の年と同じくらい古いワインを持ってるぞ。一杯飲めよ。火にあたるよりずっと暖まるぞ。」おばあさんは樽を馬小屋に持って行きました。

兵士の一人は鞍をつけた馬に乗っていて、もう一人は手に手綱を握り、三人目は尻尾をつかんでいました。おばあさんは空っぽになるまで兵士たちが欲しいだけワインを注いでやりました。まもなく一人の手から手綱が落ち、その兵士は倒れていびきをかき始めました。もう一人は尻尾を放し、寝転がるともっと大きないびきをかきました。鞍に乗っている兵士は乗ったままでしたが、馬の首に届くほど頭を垂れて眠りこけ、口で鍛冶屋のふいごのような音を立てていました。

外の兵士たちはとっくに眠ってしまい、死んだように動かないで地面に転がっていました。泥棒名人はうまくいったとわかって、最初の兵士の手に手綱の代わりに縄を持たせ、尻尾を握っていた兵士にはわら束を持たせました。しかし、馬の背に乗っている兵士はどうしたらよいのでしょうか?名人はその兵士を下ろしたくありませんでした。というのは目が覚め、叫び声をあげるかもしれなかったからです。名人はうまいことを思いついて、鞍の腹帯をはずし、壁の輪にかかっていた綱を2,3本鞍につないで、眠っている乗り手を空中に吊りあげ、縄を棒のまわりに巻いてしっかり絞めました。すぐに馬を鎖からはずしましたが、庭の敷石の上を走ったら城のみんなに聞こえてしまったでしょう。それで、名人は馬のひづめをぼろ布で包み、注意深く外に連れ出し、馬に飛び乗って走り去りました。

夜が明けると、名人は盗んだ馬にまたがって城へ走っていきました。伯爵はちょうど起きたところで窓から外を見ていました。「お早うございます、伯爵さま。」と名人は伯爵に叫びました。「さあ、馬です。無事に馬小屋から連れ出しましたよ。見てごらんなさい。あなたの兵士たちがぐっすり眠って転がっていますよ。馬小屋にお入りになれば見張りたちがどんなにくつろいでいるかご覧になれます。」伯爵は笑わないではいられませんでした。そのあと、伯爵は、「一度はうまくやったわけだ。だが二回目はそうはいかないぞ。目の前で泥棒で入ってくれば、お前を泥棒として扱うことを忘れるな。」と言いました。

伯爵夫人はその夜ベッドに行くと、指輪をはめている手をしっかり握りました。伯爵は「戸は全部錠をかけかんぬきを閉めてある。わしは起きて泥棒を待っていよう。だが、もしやつが窓から入るようなら、わしは撃ち殺す。」と言いました。しかし泥棒名人は暗闇の中を首吊り台にいき、そこにぶらさがっていた可哀そうな罪人を綱から切っておろし、背中に背負って城に運びました。それから寝室にはしごをかけ、肩に死体をかけて上り始めました。ずっと上までいくと死人の頭が窓から見えました。伯爵は、ベッドの中から見ていて、その死人めがけてピストルを発射しました。するとすぐに名人は可哀そうな罪人を落とし、はしごを降りて、片隅に隠れました。その夜は月夜で十分明るかったので、名人には伯爵が窓からはしごにのると、降りてきて死体を庭に運び、死体を入れる穴を掘り始めたのがくっきり見えました。

「今だ」と泥棒は考えました。「絶好の時だ。」片隅から素早く抜け出してはしごを上り伯爵夫人の寝室へまっすぐ向かいました。「ねぇ君」と名人は伯爵の声音で言いました。「泥棒は死んだよ。だが、なんといってもあれはわしの名付け子なんだ。悪党というより厄介者だったんだよな。あれを公にして恥をかかしたいとは思わん。それにあれの両親も可哀そうだしな。わしが自分で夜明け前にあれを庭に埋めて、ことが知られないようにしよう。だからシーツをおくれ。犬のように埋めないで死体をそれで包みたいんだ。」伯爵夫人は名人にシーツを渡しました。

「それでねぇ」と泥棒は続けました。「ふいにふといいかなと思ったんだが、指輪もくれないか。あれはやりそこなったが命をかけたんだ。だから指輪も墓に持って行かそう。」夫人は伯爵に反対したくなかったので、あまり気がすすみませんでしたが、指から指輪を抜き名人に渡しました。泥棒はこれら二つを持って去っていき、庭にいた伯爵が埋める仕事を終える前に無事に家に着きました。

次の朝名人がやってきてシーツと指輪を持って行った時、伯爵はなんとさえない顔をしたことでしょう。「お前は魔法使いか?」と伯爵は言いました。「わしが自分で入れた墓から誰がお前を出したのだ?」「私を埋めたんじゃなくて」と泥棒は言いました。「首つり台の哀れな罪人を埋めたんですよ。」そして昨夜の出来事を解き明かして話しました。伯爵は名付け子が利口でずる賢い泥棒だと認めないわけにはいきませんでした。「だが、まだおわりではないぞ。」と伯爵は付け加えて言いました。「まだ三つ目の課題をやりとげねばならん。それがうまくいかなかったら、今までやったことは何の役にも立たんからな。」名人は笑顔になり返事をしませんでした。

夜になると、名人は背中に長い袋を背負い、両脇に包みを抱え、手にカンテラをさげ、村の教会に出かけました。袋の中にはカニを、包みには短いろうそくを入れてありました。墓地に着くとカニを一匹とり出し、ろうそくをその背にくっつけました。それから小さな火をつけ、そのカニを地面に置いて、あちこち這わせました。二匹目のカニを袋から出し同じようにし、そんなふうに袋の中のカニが無くなるまでやりました。それからすぐ、修道士の僧衣のように見える長くて黒い衣を着て、あごに白髪のひげをつけました。とうとう自分が誰か見わけがつかなくなると、カニが入っていた袋をもって教会に入り、説教壇に上りました。塔の時計がちょうど12時を打っていました。最後の音が鳴りおわったとき、名人は大きなかん高い声で叫びました。「聞け、聞け、罪深い者たちよ、全ての終わりが来た。最後の日は近い。聞け、聞け。我と共に天国に行かんとする者は袋に入らねばならぬ。我はペテロなり。天国の門を開け閉めするのは我なり。外の墓地を見るがよい。死人がさまよい骨を集めているではないか。さあ、来たれ。袋に入りたまえ。世界は滅びん。」

その叫び声は村中に響き渡りました。教会のすぐ近くに住んでいた牧師と下働きは、それを最初に聞き、墓地を動き回っている光を見て何か異常なことが起こっているとわかって、教会へ入っていきました。

二人はしばらく説教を聞いていましたが、下働きが牧師をつついて、「この機会をご一緒に使い、最後の日が明ける前に、天国へ行く楽な道を見つけても悪くないでしょう。」と言いました。「実を言うと」と牧師は答えました。「私もそう考えていたところだ。ではお前もその気なら、一緒にでかけるとするか。」「はい」と下働きは答えました。「だけど、牧師さん、あなたからお先にどうぞ。私はあとからついて行きます。」それで牧師が最初に行き、名人が袋を開けている説教壇へ上りました。牧師が最初に袋にもぐり込み、次に下働きが入りました。

名人はすぐに袋を固く結び、真ん中をつかんで説教壇の階段を引きずり降ろし、二人のおバカの頭が階段にぶつかるたびに名人は「今山を越えているところだ」と叫びました。それから同じように村の中を引いていき、水たまりを通っているときは、「湿った雲の間を通り抜けているところだ」と叫びました。とうとう城に着き、その階段を引きずり上げているときに、「今天国の階段の上にいる。まもなく外庭に入るぞ。」と叫びました。上に着いてしまうと、名人は袋を鳩小屋に押し込み、鳩がぱたぱた羽ばたくと、「天使たちが喜んで翼をはばたいているのを聞くがよい。」と言いました。それから戸口にかんぬきをかけ、立ち去りました。

次の朝、名人は伯爵のところに行き、三つ目の課題もやり遂げ、教会から牧師と下働きを連れ出しましたと話しました。「二人をどこに置いたのだ?」と伯爵は尋ねました。「二人は上の鳩小屋の袋の中にいます。それで天国にいると思っているのです。」伯爵は自分で上って行き、名人が言ってることは本当だと納得しました。牧師と下働きを袋から出してやったあと、伯爵は言いました。「お前はほんとに茶目っ気のある泥棒だな。お前は賭けに勝ったよ。一度は無傷で逃がしてやる。だが、わしの領地からは出ていくがよい。再びこの地を踏むならば、首つり台にのぼるものと思え。」

茶目っ気泥棒は両親に別れを告げ、また広い世間に出ていきました。それから名人の噂はだれもきいていません。




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.