ENGLISH

Maid Maleen

TIẾNG VIỆT

Nàng Maleen


There was once a King who had a son who asked in marriage the daughter of a mighty King; she was called Maid Maleen, and was very beautiful. As her father wished to give her to another, the prince was rejected; but as they both loved each other with all their hearts, they would not give each other up, and Maid Maleen said to her father, "I can and will take no other for my husband." Then the King flew into a passion, and ordered a dark tower to be built, into which no ray of sunlight or moonlight should enter. When it was finished, he said, "Therein shalt thou be imprisoned for seven years, and then I will come and see if thy perverse spirit is broken." Meat and drink for the seven years were carried into the tower, and then she and her waiting-woman were led into it and walled up, and thus cut off from the sky and from the earth. There they sat in the darkness, and knew not when day or night began. The King's son often went round and round the tower, and called their names, but no sound from without pierced through the thick walls. What else could they do but lament and complain? Meanwhile the time passed, and by the diminution of the food and drink they knew that the seven years were coming to an end. They thought the moment of their deliverance was come; but no stroke of the hammer was heard, no stone fell out of the wall, and it seemed to Maid Maleen that her father had forgotten her. As they only had food for a short time longer, and saw a miserable death awaiting them, Maid Maleen said, "We must try our last chance, and see if we can break through the wall." She took the bread-knife, and picked and bored at the mortar of a stone, and when she was tired, the waiting-maid took her turn. With great labour they succeeded in getting out one stone, and then a second, and a third, and when three days were over the first ray of light fell on their darkness, and at last the opening was so large that they could look out. The sky was blue, and a fresh breeze played on their faces; but how melancholy everything looked all around! Her father's castle lay in ruins, the town and the villages were, so far as could be seen, destroyed by fire, the fields far and wide laid to waste, and no human being was visible. When the opening in the wall was large enough for them to slip through, the waiting-maid sprang down first, and then Maid Maleen followed. But where were they to go? The enemy had ravaged the whole kingdom, driven away the King, and slain all the inhabitants. They wandered forth to seek another country, but nowhere did they find a shelter, or a human being to give them a mouthful of bread, and their need was so great that they were forced to appease their hunger with nettles. When, after long journeying, they came into another country, they tried to get work everywhere; but wherever they knocked they were turned away, and no one would have pity on them. At last they arrived in a large city and went to the royal palace. There also they were ordered to go away, but at last the cook said that they might stay in the kitchen and be scullions.
The son of the King in whose kingdom they were, was, however, the very man who had been betrothed to Maid Maleen. His father had chosen another bride for him, whose face was as ugly as her heart was wicked. The wedding was fixed, and the maiden had already arrived; but because of her great ugliness, however, she shut herself in her room, and allowed no one to see her, and Maid Maleen had to take her her meals from the kitchen. When the day came for the bride and the bridegroom to go to church, she was ashamed of her ugliness, and afraid that if she showed herself in the streets, she would be mocked and laughed at by the people. Then said she to Maid Maleen, "A great piece of luck has befallen thee. I have sprained my foot, and cannot well walk through the streets; thou shalt put on my wedding-clothes and take my place; a greater honour than that thou canst not have!" Maid Maleen, however, refused it, and said, "I wish for no honour which is not suitable for me." It was in vain, too, that the bride offered her gold. At last she said angrily, "If thou dost not obey me, it shall cost thee thy life. I have but to speak the word, and thy head will lie at thy feet." Then she was forced to obey, and put on the bride's magnificent clothes and all her jewels. When she entered the royal hall, every one was amazed at her great beauty, and the King said to his son, "This is the bride whom I have chosen for thee, and whom thou must lead to church." The bridegroom was astonished, and thought, "She is like my Maid Maleen, and I should believe that it was she herself, but she has long been shut up in the tower, or dead." He took her by the hand and led her to church. On the way was a nettle-plant, and she said,

"Oh, nettle-plant,
Little nettle-plant,
What dost thou here alone?
I have known the time
When I ate thee unboiled,
When I ate thee unroasted."
"What art thou saying?" asked the King's son. "Nothing," she replied, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." He was surprised that she knew about her, but kept silence. When they came to the foot-plank into the churchyard, she said,
"Foot-bridge, do not break,
I am not the true bride."
"What art thou saying there?" asked the King's son. "Nothing," she replied, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." - "Dost thou know Maid Maleen?" - "No," she answered, "how should I know her; I have only heard of her." When they came to the church-door, she said once more,

"Church-door, break not,
I am not the true bride."
"What art thou saying there?" asked he. "Ah," she answered, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." Then he took out a precious chain, put it round her neck, and fastened the clasp. Thereupon they entered the church, and the priest joined their hands together before the altar, and married them. He led her home, but she did not speak a single word the whole way. When they got back to the royal palace, she hurried into the bride's chamber, put off the magnificent clothes and the jewels, dressed herself in her gray gown, and kept nothing but the jewel on her neck, which she had received from the bridegroom.
When the night came, and the bride was to be led into the prince's apartment, she let her veil fall over her face, that he might not observe the deception. As soon as every one had gone away, he said to her, "What didst thou say to the nettle-plant which was growing by the wayside?"

"To which nettle-plant?" asked she; "I don't talk to nettle-plants." - "If thou didst not do it, then thou art not the true bride," said he. So she bethought herself, and said,

"I must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me."
She went out and sought Maid Maleen. "Girl, what hast thou been saying to the nettle?" - "I said nothing but,

"Oh, nettle-plant,
Little nettle-plant,
What dost thou here alone?
I have known the time
When I ate thee unboiled,
When I ate thee unroasted."
The bride ran back into the chamber, and said, "I know now what I said to the nettle," and she repeated the words which she had just heard. "But what didst thou say to the foot-bridge when we went over it?" asked the King's son. "To the foot-bridge?" she answered. "I don't talk to foot-bridges." - "Then thou art not the true bride."
She again said,


"I must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me,"
And ran out and found Maid Maleen, "Girl, what didst thou say to the foot-bridge?"
"I said nothing but,


"Foot-bridge, do not break,
I am not the true bride."
"That costs thee thy life!" cried the bride, but she hurried into the room, and said, "I know now what I said to the foot-bridge," and she repeated the words. "But what didst thou say to the church-door?" - "To the church-door?" she replied; "I don't talk to church-doors." - "Then thou art not the true bride."
She went out and found Maid Maleen, and said, "Girl, what didst thou say to the church-door?"

"I said nothing but,

"Church-door, break not,
I am not the true bride."
"That will break thy neck for thee!" cried the bride, and flew into a terrible passion, but she hastened back into the room, and said, "I know now what I said to the church-door," and she repeated the words. "But where hast thou the jewel which I gave thee at the church-door?" - "What jewel?" she answered; "thou didst not give me any jewel." - "I myself put it round thy neck, and I myself fastened it; if thou dost not know that, thou art not the true bride." He drew the veil from her face, and when he saw her immeasurable ugliness, he sprang back terrified, and said, "How comest thou here? Who art thou?" - "I am thy betrothed bride, but because I feared lest the people should mock me when they saw me out of doors, I commanded the scullery-maid to dress herself in my clothes, and to go to church instead of me." - "Where is the girl?" said he; "I want to see her, go and bring her here." She went out and told the servants that the scullery-maid was an impostor, and that they must take her out into the court-yard and strike off her head. The servants laid hold of Maid Maleen and wanted to drag her out, but she screamed so loudly for help, that the King's son heard her voice, hurried out of his chamber and ordered them to set the maiden free instantly. Lights were brought, and then he saw on her neck the gold chain which he had given her at the church-door. "Thou art the true bride, said he, "who went with me to the church; come with me now to my room." When they were both alone, he said, "On the way to church thou didst name Maid Maleen, who was my betrothed bride; if I could believe it possible, I should think she was standing before me thou art like her in every respect." She answered, "I am Maid Maleen, who for thy sake was imprisoned seven years in the darkness, who suffered hunger and thirst, and has lived so long in want and poverty. To-day, however, the sun is shining on me once more. I was married to thee in the church, and I am thy lawful wife." Then they kissed each other, and were happy all the days of their lives. The false bride was rewarded for what she had done by having her head cut off.
The tower in which Maid Maleen had been imprisoned remained standing for a long time, and when the children passed by it they sang,

"Kling, klang, gloria.
Who sits within this tower?
A King's daughter, she sits within,
A sight of her I cannot win,
The wall it will not break,
The stone cannot be pierced.
Little Hans, with your coat so gay,
Follow me, follow me, fast as you may."
Ngày xửa ngày xưa, hoàng tử nước kia muốn xin cưới nàng Maleen đẹp tuyệt trần, con gái vua một nước hùng cường. Vì nhà vua định gả nàng cho một người khác nên lời hỏi của hoàng tử bị khước từ. Nhưng hoàng tử và Maleen rất mực thương yêu nhau, không muốn phải sống xa nhau. Một hôm, nàng Maleen thưa với vua cha:
- Con không thể nào và cũng không muốn lấy ai khác.
Nhà vua nổi giận, truyền cho xây một cái tháp kín mít, không có ánh sáng mặt trời, cũng như mặt trăng nào lọt vào được trong tháp. Tháp xây xong, vua phán:
- Con phải sống ở trong tháp này bảy năm, cha muốn biết, liệu đến lúc đó con có còn bướng bỉnh nữa hay không.
Trong tháp để đầy đủ thức ăn dùng trong bảy năm. Khi công chúa và người thị nữ đã vào trong tháp thì cửa được xây kín lại, hai người giờ đây sống cách biệt với trời đất bên ngoài. Ở trong tháp tối không thể nào phân biệt được ngày và đêm. Hoàng tử thường lui tới quanh tháp, gọi tên nàng, nhưng tiếng gọi làm sao đi qua nổi những bức tường dày mà vào trong tháp. Họ còn biết làm gì nữa ngoài khóc than! Thời gian trôi qua, thức ăn đồ uống trong tháp đã cạn, công chúa biết là thời hạn bảy năm cũng sắp hết. Công chúa tưởng giờ phút giải thoát cũng sắp tới, nhưng nàng vẫn không nghe thấy tiếng búa phá tường, không thấy có một viên gạch, đá nào rơi ở tường xuống. Hình như nhà vua quên công chúa rồi!
Thấy lương thực chỉ đủ dùng cho một thời gian ngắn và thấy trước cái chết bi thảm có thể tới với mình, công chúa nói:
- Trong bước đường cùng này, chúng ta phải tìm cách phá tường thôi.
Nàng lấy dao ăn khoét vữa, khi nào mệt thì thị nữ làm tiếp. Làm mãi thì họ cũng lấy được viên đá thứ nhất ra, rồi viên thứ hai, thứ ba… Sau ba ngày thì ánh sáng mặt trời có thể rọi vào trong tháp, lỗ hổng đào cũng khá to, đủ để nhìn ngắm ra ngoài được. Trời trong xanh, một luồng gió mát thổi vào họ, nhưng quang cảnh sao mà điêu tàn vậy! Hoàng cung đổ nát, hoang tàn. Kinh thành, làng mạc bị đốt trụi, đồng ruộng bỏ hoang, không có một bóng người nào qua lại! Hai người tiếp tục đào, khi lỗ hổng to đủ để chui ra ngoài thì người thị nữ chui ra trước, nàng Malêen theo sau. Nhưng đi đâu bây giờ?
Quân thù đã dày xéo đất nước, đuổi nhà vua, tàn sát trăm họ. Hai người định đi lang thang tìm một xứ sở khác, không chốn nương thân, không ai cho chút bánh nào ăn. Trong cảnh khốn cùng ấy, họ đành phải ăn vỏ, lá cây cho đỡ đói.
Cuối cùng họ cũng tới một xứ sở khác, nhưng mỗi khi gõ cửa xin việc họ đều bị từ chối, hắt hủi, không ai động lòng thương tới tình cảnh của họ. Sau họ tới kinh thành, vào hoàng cung xin việc, nhưng ở đây người ta lại chỉ bảo họ nên đi nơi khác. Mãi sau có người đầu bếp nhận, bảo họ quét tro bếp.
Hoàng tử con vua nước này chính là chồng chưa cưới của nàng Maleen. Vua cha hỏi cho chàng một người xấu cả người lẫn nết, ngày cưới đã được định, cô dâu cũng đã tới. Nhưng vì xấu quá, không muốn để ai thấy nàng nên cô dâu cấm cung, nàng Maleen phải bưng thức ăn vào trong buồng cho cô dâu.
Sắp đến ngày đi nhà thờ làm lễ cưới, cô dâu thẹn vì mình xấu xí, sợ ló mặt ra đường sẽ bị thiên hạ nhạo báng, chê cười. Cô dâu gọi Maleen tới bảo:
- Thật là đại phúc cho mày! Tao bị sai khớp xương nên không đi ra phố được. Mày hãy thay tao, mặc quần áo cô dâu vào. Thật không còn vinh dự nào lớn hơn cho mày nữa.
Nàng Maleen mới khước từ:
- Tôi đâu dám nhận phần vinh dự đó.
Cô dâu lấy vàng mua chuộc nàng cũng chối từ.
Cô dâu tức giận nói:
- Nếu không nghe lời tao thì toi mạng. Ta chỉ nói một lời là đầu lìa khỏi cổ.
Nàng Maleen đành tuân lời, mặc quần áo cô dâu, đeo đồ trang sức, nom nàng đẹp thật lộng lẫy.
Khi nàng Maleen bước vào phòng khách hoàng cung, mọi người phải sửng sốt vì sắc đẹp tuyệt vời của nàng. Nhà vua bảo hoàng tử:
- Đó là cô dâu mà cha đã chọn cho con. Con hãy dẫn nàng đi nhà thờ.
Hoàng tử hết sức ngạc nhiên, và nghĩ bụng:
- Biết đâu đây chính là nàng Maleen mà ta hằng yêu mến. Nhưng nàng bị giam trong tháp kín và đã chết rồi cơ mà.
Hoàng tử cùng cô dâu tới nhà thờ. Trên đường đi, thấy bụi gai trên đường, cô dâu nói:
Bụi gai, bụi gai,
Bụi gai nho nhỏ,
Đứng đó một mình,
Hình như ta đã,
Xả vỏ lá cành,
Đem nấu thành canh.
Hoàng tử hỏi cô dâu:
- Em vừa nói gì đấy?
Nàng đáp:
- Thưa không. Em chợt nhớ tới nàng Malêen.
Hoàng tử ngạc nhiên khi thấy cô dâu cũng biết nàng Malêen, nhưng chàng cứ lặng thinh không nói gì. Khi xe ngựa sắp qua chiếc cầu nhỏ để vào sân nhà thờ, cô dâu nói:
Đừng gãy cầu nhá,
Cô bé ở nhà,
Mới là cô dâu,
Tôi đâu có phải.
Hoàng tử lại hỏi cô dâu:
- Em vừa nói gì đấy?
Nàng đáp:
- Không ạ, em chợt nhớ tới nàng Maleen.
- Thế em có quen với nàng Maleen không?
- Em làm sao mà quen được nàng, em chỉ nghe nói đến tên nàng.
Khi hai người đến trước cửa nhà thờ, nàng nói:
Đừng gãy cửa nhé,
Cô bé ở nhà,
Mới là cô dâu,
Tôi đâu có phải.
Hoàng tử hỏi:
- Em vừa nói gì đấy?
Nàng đáp:
- Trời, em vừa lại nhớ tới nàng Maleen.
Hoàng tử lấy chiếc dây chuyền đeo vào cổ nàng và cài móc lại. Hai người bước vào nhà thờ, cha đạo đặt tay họ vào nhau và làm lễ thành hôn. Chàng đưa nàng về, nhưng dọc đường nàng không nói nửa lời. Về đến hoàng cung, nàng về ngay phòng cô dâu, cởi quần áo đẹp, tháo hết đồ nữ trang, mặc chiếc tạp dề màu xám của người quét tro bếp, chỉ đeo chiếc dây chuyền vàng mà chú rể tặng.
Đến đêm người ta dẫn cô dâu tới phòng chú rể. Để cho hoàng tử không nhận ra sự đánh tráo, cô dâu mặt che mạng. Khi mọi người đã lui ra hết, chú rể nói với cô dâu:
- Hôm nay em nói những gì với bụi gai ở bên đường thế?
Cô dâu hỏi:
- Với bụi gai nào nhỉ? Em có nói với bụi gai nào đâu.
Chú rể nói:
- Nếu không phải là em nói thì chắc em không phải là cô dâu thật.
Để tránh ngờ vực, cô nói:
Để em ra tìm con hầu,
Nó làm em rối cả đầu, anh ơi.
Cô chạy ra la hỏi nàng Malêen:
- Này con hầu, mày đã nói gì với bụi gai thế?
- Thưa tôi chỉ nói:
Bụi gai, bụi gai,
Bụi gai nho nhỏ,
Đứng đó một mình,
Hình như ta đã,
Xả vỏ lá cành,
Đem nấu thành canh.
Cô dâu chạy về buồng và nói:
- Giờ thì em nhớ là em đã nói gì với bụi gai.
Và cô nhắc lại những lời cô vừa nghe được.
Hoàng tử lại hỏi:
- Khi đi qua cầu, em nói gì với chiếc cầu trước nhà thờ?
Cô đáp:
- Chiếc cầu trước nhà thờ! Em có nói với chiếc cầu trước nhà thờ nào đâu.
- Nếu không phải là em nói thì chắc em không phải là cô dâu thật.
Cô lại nói:
Để em ra tìm con hầu,
Nó làm em rối cả đầu, anh ơi.
Cô chạy ra la hỏi nàng Malêen:
- Này con hầu, mày đã nói gì với chiếc cầu trước nhà thờ thế?
- Thưa tôi chỉ nói:
Đừng gãy cầu nhá,
Cô bé ở nhà,
Mới là cô dâu,
Tôi đâu có phải.
Cô dâu hét lớn:
- Tội mày đáng chết lắm đấy!
Rồi cô vội vã chạy về phòng và nói:
- Giờ thì em nhớ là em đã nói gì với chiếc cầu.
Và cô nhắc lại những lời cô vừa nghe được.
Hoàng tử lại hỏi:
- Thế em đã nói gì với cửa nhà thờ?
Cô đáp:
- Với cửa nhà thờ! Em có nói gì với cửa nhà thờ đâu.
- Nếu không phải là em nói thì chắc em không phải là cô dâu thật.
Cô chạy ra và la mắng, hỏi nàng Maleen:
- Này con hầu, mày đã nói gì với cửa nhà thờ?
- Thưa tôi chỉ nói:
Đừng gãy cửa nhé,
Cô bé ở nhà,
Mới là cô dâu,
Tôi đâu có phải.
Cô dâu nổi giận, hét lớn:
- Tội mày đáng vặn cổ chết.
Rồi cô vội vã chạy về phòng và nói:
- Giờ thì em nhớ là em đã nói gì với chiếc cửa nhà thờ.
Và cô nhắc lại những lời cô vừa nghe được.
Hoàng tử lại hỏi:
- Nhưng thế thì đồ nữ trang anh trao tặng em giờ đâu rồi?
Cô đáp:
- Đồ nữ trang! Anh có đưa tặng em đồ nữ trang đâu nhỉ?
- Chính anh đeo cho em chiếc dây chuyền vàng và móc cài khóa dây chuyền. Nếu em lại không biết điều đó thì chắc em không phải là cô dâu thật.
Hoàng tử gỡ tấm mạng che mặt cô dâu. Chàng nhảy lùi lại vì sợ hãi, khi nhìn thấy rõ khuôn mặt xấu xí kia. Chàng nói:
- Cô ở đâu tới đây? Cô là ai?
- Em là vợ chưa cưới của chàng. Em sợ ra ngoài thiên hạ nhìn thấy em họ sẽ dè bỉu chê cười, em đã ra lệnh cho con hầu quét tro bếp mặc quần áo cưới và thay em đi nhà thờ.
Hoàng tử nói:
- Cô bé ấy ở đâu? Đi gọi cô ấy lại đây, ta muốn thấy mặt cô ấy.
Cô ra bảo thị vệ là con bé quét tro bếp là đồ phản trắc, phải đưa nó ngay ra trước sân mà chém. Đám thị vệ nắm tay nàng Maleen kéo đi, nàng la hét cầu cứu, tiếng kêu cứu vang tới buồng hoàng tử. Nghe tiếng kêu cứu, hoàng tử vội chạy ra, truyền lệnh thả ngay nàng ra. Đuốc được mang tới, hoàng tử nhận ra ngay chiếc dây chuyền vàng chính chàng đã tặng ở nhà thờ. Hoàng tử nói:
- Em mới là cô dâu thật, người đã cùng đi với anh tới nhà thờ để làm lễ. Em hãy cùng anh về buồng.
Khi chỉ còn lại hai người trong buồng, hoàng tử nói:
- Trên đường tới nhà thờ, em có nhắc tới tên nàng Maleen - người vợ chưa cưới của anh. Anh không thể tưởng tượng được, chính nàng Maleen lại giống em như hệt.
Nàng đáp:
- Chính em là Maleen, người vì chàng mà bị giam bảy năm trời trong ngục tối, chịu đói chịu khát cùng những lầm than cơ cực trong suốt những năm trời ấy. Nhưng hôm nay em đã nhìn thấy ánh sáng mặt trời, được cùng anh tới nhà thờ làm lễ và giờ đây em là người vợ chính thức của anh.
Chàng và nàng hôn nhau. Họ sống hạnh phúc bên nhau cho đến khi tóc bạc răng long. Cô dâu giả bị trừng phạt thích đáng.
Tháp giam nàng Malêen còn đứng đó. Mỗi khi đi qua tháp, trẻ con thường hát:
Tính tình tang tang,
Nàng nào trong đó?
Có phải Maleen,
Khen người có chí,
Bền bỉ đợi chờ,
Thương nhớ Hans.

Dịch: Lương Văn Hồng, © Lương Văn Hồng




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.