ENGLISH

Rapunzel

ESPAÑOL

Rapunzel


There once lived a man and his wife, who had long wished for a child, but in vain. Now there was at the back of their house a little window which overlooked a beautiful garden full of the finest vegetables and flowers; but there was a high wall all round it, and no one ventured into it, for it belonged to a witch of great might, and of whom all the world was afraid.

One day that the wife was standing at the window, and looking into the garden, she saw a bed filled with the finest rampion; and it looked so fresh and green that she began to wish for some; and at length she longed for it greatly. This went on for days, and as she knew she could not get the rampion, she pined away, and grew pale and miserable. Then the man was uneasy, and asked, "What is the matter, dear wife?"

"Oh," answered she, "I shall die unless I can have some of that rampion to eat that grows in the garden at the back of our house." The man, who loved her very much, thought to himself, "Rather than lose my wife I will get some rampion, cost what it will." So in the twilight he climbed over the wall into the witch's garden, plucked hastily a handful of rampion and brought it to his wife. She made a salad of it at once, and ate of it to her heart's content. But she liked it so much, and it tasted so good, that the next day she longed for it thrice as much as she had done before; if she was to have any rest the man must climb over the wall once more. So he went in the twilight again; and as he was climbing back, he saw, all at once, the witch standing before him, and was terribly frightened, as she cried, with angry eyes, "How dare you climb over into my garden like a thief, and steal my rampion! it shall be the worse for you!"

"Oh," answered he, "be merciful rather than just, I have only done it through necessity; for my wife saw your rampion out of the window, and became possessed with so great a longing that she would have died if she could not have had some to eat." Then the witch said,
"If it is all as you say you may have as much rampion as you like, on one condition - the child that will come into the world must be given to me. It shall go well with the child, and I will care for it like a mother."

In his distress of mind the man promised everything; and when the time came when the child was born the witch appeared, and, giving the child the name of Rapunzel (which is the same as rampion), she took it away with her.

Rapunzel was the most beautiful child in the world. When she was twelve years old the witch shut her up in a tower in the midst of a wood, and it had neither steps nor door, only a small window above. When the witch wished to be let in, she would stand below and would cry,

"Rapunzel, Rapunzel!
Let down your hair!"

Rapunzel had beautiful long hair that shone like gold. When she. heard the voice of the witch she would undo the fastening of the upper window, unbind the plaits of her hair, and let it down twenty ells below, and the witch would climb up by it.

After they had lived thus a few years it happened that as the King's son was riding through the wood, he came to the tower; and as he drew near he heard a voice singing so sweetly that he stood still and listened. It was Rapunzel in her loneliness trying to pass away the time with sweet songs. The King's son wished to go in to her, and sought to find a door in the tower, but there was none. So he rode home, but the song had entered into his heart, and every day he went into the wood and listened to it. Once, as he was standing there under a tree, he saw the witch come up, and listened while she called out,

"O Rapunzel, Rapunzel!
Let down your hair."

Then he saw how Rapunzel let down her long tresses, and how the witch climbed up by it and went in to her, and he said to himself, "Since that is the ladder I will climb it, and seek my fortune." And the next day, as soon as it began to grow dusk, he went to the tower and cried,

"O Rapunzel, Rapunzel!
Let down your hair."

And she let down her hair, and the King's son climbed up by it. Rapunzel was greatly terrified when she saw that a man had come in to her, for she had never seen one before; but the King's son began speaking so kindly to her, and told how her singing had entered into his heart, so that he could have no peace until he had seen her herself. Then Rapunzel forgot her terror, and when he asked her to take him for her husband, and she saw that he was young and beautiful, she thought to herself, "I certainly like him much better than old mother Gothel," and she put her hand into his hand.

She said: "I would willingly go with thee, but I do not know how I shall get out. When thou comest, bring each time a silken rope, and I will make a ladder, and when it is quite ready I will get down by it out of the tower, and thou shalt take me away on thy horse." They agreed that he should come to her every evening, as the old woman came in the day-time.

So the witch knew nothing of all this until once Rapunzel said to her unwittingly, "Mother Gothel, how is it that you climb up here so slowly, and the King's son is with me in a moment?"

"O wicked child," cried the witch, "what is this I hear! I thought I had hidden thee from all the world, and thou hast betrayed me!" In her anger she seized Rapunzel by her beautiful hair, struck her several times with her left hand, and then grasping a pair of shears in her right - snip, snap - the beautiful locks lay on the ground. And she was so hard-hearted that she took Rapunzel and put her in a waste and desert place, where she lived in great woe and misery.
The same day on which she took Rapunzel away she went back to the tower in the evening and made fast the severed locks of hair to the window-hasp, and the King's son came and cried,

"Rapunzel, Rapunzel!
Let down your hair."

Then she let the hair down, and the King's son climbed up, but instead of his dearest Rapunzel he found the witch looking at him with wicked glittering eyes.

"Aha!" cried she, mocking him, "you came for your darling, but the sweet bird sits no longer in the nest, and sings no more; the cat has got her, and will scratch out your eyes as well! Rapunzel is lost to you; you will see her no more." The King's son was beside himself with grief, and in his agony he sprang from the tower: he escaped with life, but the thorns on which he fell put out his eyes. Then he wandered blind through the wood, eating nothing but roots and berries, and doing nothing but lament and weep for the loss of his dearest wife.

So he wandered several years in misery until at last he came to the desert place where Rapunzel lived with her twin-children that she had borne, a boy and a girl. At first he heard a voice that he thought he knew, and when he reached the place from which it seemed to come Rapunzel knew him, and fell on his neck and wept. And when her tears touched his eyes they became clear again, and he could see with them as well as ever. Then he took her to his kingdom, where he was received with great joy, and there they lived long and happily.
Había una vez un hombre y una mujer que vivían solos y desconsolados por no tener hijos, hasta que, por fin, la mujer concibió la esperanza de que Dios Nuestro Señor se disponía a satisfacer su anhelo. La casa en que vivían tenía en la pared trasera una ventanita que daba a un magnífico jardín, en el que crecían espléndidas flores y plantas; pero estaba rodeado de un alto muro y nadie osaba entrar en él, ya que pertenecía a una bruja muy poderosa y temida de todo el mundo. Un día asomóse la mujer a aquella ventana a contemplar el jardín, y vio un bancal plantado de hermosísimas verdezuelas, tan frescas y verdes, que despertaron en ella un violento antojo de comerlas. El antojo fue en aumento cada día que pasaba, y como la mujer lo creía irrealizable, iba perdiendo la color y desmirriándose, a ojos vistas. Viéndola tan desmejorada, le preguntó asustado su marido: "¿Qué te ocurre, mujer?" - "¡Ay!" exclamó ella, "me moriré si no puedo comer las verdezuelas del jardín que hay detrás de nuestra casa." El hombre, que quería mucho a su esposa, pensó: "Antes que dejarla morir conseguiré las verdezuelas, cueste lo que cueste." Y, al anochecer, saltó el muro del jardín de la bruja, arrancó precipitadamente un puñado de verdezuelas y las llevó a su mujer. Ésta se preparó enseguida una ensalada y se la comió muy a gusto; y tanto le y tanto le gustaron, que, al día siguiente, su afán era tres veces más intenso. Si quería gozar de paz, el marido debía saltar nuevamente al jardín. Y así lo hizo, al anochecer. Pero apenas había puesto los pies en el suelo, tuvo un terrible sobresalto, pues vio surgir ante sí la bruja. "¿Cómo te atreves," díjole ésta con mirada iracunda, "a entrar cual un ladrón en mi jardín y robarme las verdezuelas? Lo pagarás muy caro." - "¡Ay!" respondió el hombre, "tened compasión de mí. Si lo he hecho, ha sido por una gran necesidad: mi esposa vio desde la ventana vuestras verdezuelas y sintió un antojo tan grande de comerlas, que si no las tuviera se moriría." La hechicera se dejó ablandar y le dijo: "Si es como dices, te dejaré coger cuantas verdezuelas quieras, con una sola condición: tienes que darme el hijo que os nazca. Estará bien y lo cuidaré como una madre." Tan apurado estaba el hombre, que se avino a todo y, cuando nació el hijo, que era una niña, presentóse la bruja y, después de ponerle el nombre de Verdezuela; se la llevó.

Verdezuela era la niña más hermosa que viera el sol. Cuando cumplió los doce años, la hechicera la encerró en una torre que se alzaba en medio de un bosque y no tenía puertas ni escaleras; únicamente en lo alto había una diminuta ventana. Cuando la bruja quería entrar, colocábase al pie y gritaba:

"¡Verdezuela, Verdezuela,
Suéltame tu cabellera!"

Verdezuela tenía un cabello magnífico y larguísimo, fino como hebras de oro. Cuando oía la voz de la hechicera se soltaba las trenzas, las envolvía en torno a un gancho de la ventana y las dejaba colgantes: y como tenían veinte varas de longitud, la bruja trepaba por ellas.

Al cabo de algunos años, sucedió que el hijo del Rey, encontrándose en el bosque, acertó a pasar junto a la torre y oyó un canto tan melodioso, que hubo de detenerse a escucharlo. Era Verdezuela, que entretenía su soledad lanzando al aire su dulcísima voz. El príncipe quiso subir hasta ella y buscó la puerta de la torre, pero, no encontrando ninguna, se volvió a palacio. No obstante, aquel canto lo había arrobado de tal modo, que todos los días iba al bosque a escucharlo. Hallándose una vez oculto detrás de un árbol, vio que se acercaba la hechicera, y la oyó que gritaba, dirigiéndose a o alto:

"¡Verdezuela, Verdezuela,
Suéltame tu cabellera!"

Verdezuela soltó sus trenzas, y la bruja se encaramó a lo alto de la torre. "Si ésta es la escalera para subir hasta allí," se dijo el príncipe, "también yo probaré fortuna." Y al día siguiente, cuando ya comenzaba a oscurecer, encaminóse al pie de la torre y dijo:

"¡Verdezuela, Verdezuela,
Suéltame tu cabellera!"

Enseguida descendió la trenza, y el príncipe subió.

En el primer momento, Verdezuela se asustó Verdezuela se asustó mucho al ver un hombre, pues jamás sus ojos habían visto ninguno. Pero el príncipe le dirigió la palabra con gran afabilidad y le explicó que su canto había impresionado de tal manera su corazón, que ya no había gozado de un momento de paz hasta hallar la manera de subir a verla. Al escucharlo perdió Verdezuela el miedo, y cuando él le preguntó si lo quería por esposo, viendo la muchacha que era joven y apuesto, pensó, "Me querrá más que la vieja," y le respondió, poniendo la mano en la suya: "Sí; mucho deseo irme contigo; pero no sé cómo bajar de aquí. Cada vez que vengas, tráete una madeja de seda; con ellas trenzaré una escalera y, cuando esté terminada, bajaré y tú me llevarás en tu caballo." Convinieron en que hasta entonces el príncipe acudiría todas las noches, ya que de día iba la vieja. La hechicera nada sospechaba, hasta que un día Verdezuela le preguntó: "Decidme, tía Gothel, ¿cómo es que me cuesta mucho más subiros a vos que al príncipe, que está arriba en un santiamén?" - "¡Ah, malvada!" exclamó la bruja, "¿qué es lo que oigo? Pensé que te había aislado de todo el mundo, y, sin embargo, me has engañado." Y, furiosa, cogió las hermosas trenzas de Verdezuela, les dio unas vueltas alrededor de su mano izquierda y, empujando unas tijeras con la derecha, zis, zas, en un abrir y cerrar de ojos cerrar de ojos se las cortó, y tiró al suelo la espléndida cabellera. Y fue tan despiadada, que condujo a la pobre Verdezuela a un lugar desierto, condenándola a una vida de desolación y miseria.

El mismo día en que se había llevado a la muchacha, la bruja ató las trenzas cortadas al gancho de la ventana, y cuando se presentó el príncipe y dijo:

"¡Verdezuela, Verdezuela,
Suéltame tu cabellera!"

la bruja las soltó, y por ellas subió el hijo del Rey. Pero en vez de encontrar a su adorada Verdezuela hallóse cara a cara con la hechicera, que lo miraba con ojos malignos y perversos: "¡Ajá!" exclamó en tono de burla, "querías llevarte a la niña bonita; pero el pajarillo ya no está en el nido ni volverá a cantar. El gato lo ha cazado, y también a ti te sacará los ojos. Verdezuela está perdida para ti; jamás volverás a verla." El príncipe, fuera de sí de dolor y desesperación, se arrojó desde lo alto de la torre. Salvó la vida, pero los espinos sobre los que fue a caer se le clavaron en los ojos, y el infeliz hubo de vagar errante por el bosque, ciego, alimentándose de raíces y bayas y llorando sin cesar la pérdida de su amada mujercita. Y así anduvo sin rumbo por espacio de varios años, mísero y triste, hasta que, al fin, llegó al desierto en que vivía Verdezuela con los dos hijitos los dos hijitos gemelos, un niño y una niña, a los que había dado a luz. Oyó el príncipe una voz que le pareció conocida y, al acercarse, reconociólo Verdezuela y se le echó al cuello llorando. Dos de sus lágrimas le humedecieron los ojos, y en el mismo momento se le aclararon, volviendo a ver como antes. Llevóla a su reino, donde fue recibido con gran alegría, y vivieron muchos años contentos y felices.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.