ENGLISH

Cinderella

POLSKI

Kopciuszek


There was once a rich man whose wife lay sick, and when she felt her end drawing near she called to her only daughter to come near her bed, and said, "Dear child, be pious and good, and God will always take care of you, and I will look down upon you from heaven, and will be with you." And then she closed her eyes and expired. The maiden went every day to her mother's grave and wept, and was always pious and good. When the winter came the snow covered the grave with a white covering, and when the sun came in the early spring and melted it away, the man took to himself another wife.

The new wife brought two daughters home with her, and they were beautiful and fair in appearance, but at heart were, black and ugly. And then began very evil times for the poor step-daughter. "Is the stupid creature to sit in the same room with us?" said they; "those who eat food must earn it. Out upon her for a kitchen-maid!" They took away her pretty dresses, and put on her an old grey kirtle, and gave her wooden shoes to wear. "Just look now at the proud princess, how she is decked out!" cried they laughing, and then they sent her into the kitchen. There she was obliged to do heavy work from morning to night, get up early in the morning, draw water, make the fires, cook, and wash. Besides that, the sisters did their utmost to torment her, mocking her, and strewing peas and lentils among the ashes, and setting her to pick them up. In the evenings, when she was quite tired out with her hard day's work, she had no bed to lie on, but was obliged to rest on the hearth among the cinders. And as she always looked dusty and dirty, they named her Cinderella.

It happened one day that the father went to the fair, and he asked his two step-daughters what he should bring back for them. "Fine clothes!" said one. "Pearls and jewels!" said the other. "But what will you have, Cinderella?" said he. "The first twig, father, that strikes against your hat on the way home; that is what I should like you to bring me." So he bought for the two step-daughters fine clothes, pearls, and jewels, and on his way back, as he rode through a green lane, a hazel-twig struck against his hat; and he broke it off and carried it home with him. And when he reached home he gave to the step-daughters what they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the hazel-twig. She thanked him, and went to her mother's grave, and planted this twig there, weeping so bitterly that the tears fell upon it and watered it, and it flourished and became a fine tree. Cinderella went to see it three times a day, and wept and prayed, and each time a white bird rose up from the tree, and if she uttered any wish the bird brought her whatever she had wished for.

Now if came to pass that the king ordained a festival that should last for three days, and to which all the beautiful young women of that country were bidden, so that the king's son might choose a bride from among them. When the two stepdaughters heard that they too were bidden to appear, they felt very pleased, and they called Cinderella, and said, "Comb our hair, brush our shoes, and make our buckles fast, we are going to the wedding feast at the king's castle." Cinderella, when she heard this, could not help crying, for she too would have liked to go to the dance, and she begged her step-mother to allow her. "What, you Cinderella!" said she, "in all your dust and dirt, you want to go to the festival! you that have no dress and no shoes! you want to dance!" But as she persisted in asking, at last the step-mother said, "I have strewed a dish-full of lentils in the ashes, and if you can pick them all up again in two hours you may go with us." Then the maiden went to the backdoor that led into the garden, and called out, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

Then there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and after them some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes; and the doves nodded with their heads, and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. Before an hour was over all was done, and they flew away. Then the maiden brought the dish to her step-mother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go to the feast; but the step-mother said, "No, Cinderella, you have no proper clothes, and you do not know how to dance, and you would be laughed at!" And when Cinderella cried for disappointment, she added, "If you can pick two dishes full of lentils out of the ashes, nice and clean, you shall go with us," thinking to herself, "for that is not possible." When she had strewed two dishes full of lentils among the ashes the maiden went through the backdoor into the garden, and cried, "O gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me!

The good must be put in the dish,
The bad you may eat if you wish."

So there came to the kitchen-window two white doves, and then some turtle-doves, and at last a crowd of all the other birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering, and they alighted among the ashes, and the doves nodded with their heads and began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and then all the others began to pick, peck, pick, peck, and put all the good grains into the dish. And before half-an-hour was over it was all done, and they flew away. Then the maiden took the dishes to the stepmother, feeling joyful, and thinking that now she should go with them to the feast; but she said "All this is of no good to you; you cannot come with us, for you have no proper clothes, and cannot dance; you would put us to shame." Then she turned her back on poor Cinderella, and made haste to set out with her two proud daughters.

And as there was no one left in the house, Cinderella went to her mother's grave, under the hazel bush, and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and a pair of slippers embroidered with silk and silver. , And in all haste she put on the dress and went to the festival. But her step-mother and sisters did not know her, and thought she must be a foreign princess, she looked so beautiful in her golden dress. Of Cinderella they never thought at all, and supposed that she was sitting at home, arid picking the lentils out of the ashes. The King's son came to meet her, and took her by the hand and danced with her, and he refused to stand up with any one else, so that he might not be obliged to let go her hand; and when any one came to claim it he answered, "She is my partner."

And when the evening came she wanted to go home, but the prince said he would go with her to take care of her, for he wanted to see where the beautiful maiden lived. But she escaped him, and jumped up into the pigeon-house. Then the prince waited until the father came, and told him the strange maiden had jumped into the pigeon-house. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for axes and hatchets, and had the pigeon-house cut down, but there was no one in it. And when they entered the house there sat Cinderella in her dirty clothes among the cinders, and a little oil-lamp burnt dimly in the chimney; for Cinderella had been very quick, and had jumped out of the pigeon-house again, and had run to the hazel bush; and there she had taken off her beautiful dress and had laid it on the grave, and the bird had carried it away again, and then she had put on her little gray kirtle again, and had sat down in. the kitchen among the cinders.

The next day, when the festival began anew, and the parents and step-sisters had gone to it, Cinderella went to the hazel bush and cried,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a still more splendid dress than on the day before. And when she appeared in it among the guests every one was astonished at her beauty. The prince had been waiting until she came, and he took her hand and danced with her alone. And when any one else came to invite her he said, "She is my partner." And when the evening came she wanted to go home, and the prince followed her, for he wanted to see to what house she belonged; but she broke away from him, and ran into the garden at the back of the house. There stood a fine large tree, bearing splendid pears; she leapt as lightly as a squirrel among the branches, and the prince did not know what had become of her. So he waited until the father came, and then he told him that the strange maiden had rushed from him, and that he thought she had gone up into the pear-tree. The father thought to himself, "It cannot surely be Cinderella," and called for an axe, and felled the tree, but there was no one in it. And when they went into the kitchen there sat Cinderella among the cinders, as usual, for she had got down the other side of the tree, and had taken back her beautiful clothes to the bird on the hazel bush, and had put on her old grey kirtle again.

On the third day, when the parents and the step-children had set off, Cinderella went again to her mother's grave, and said to the tree,

"Little tree, little tree, shake over me,
That silver and gold may come down and cover me."

Then the bird cast down a dress, the like of which had never been seen for splendour and brilliancy, and slippers that were of gold. And when she appeared in this dress at the feast nobody knew what to say for wonderment. The prince danced with her alone, and if any one else asked her he answered, "She is my partner."

And when it was evening Cinderella wanted to go home, and the prince was about to go with her, when she ran past him so quickly that he could not follow her. But he had laid a plan, and had caused all the steps to be spread with pitch, so that as she rushed down them the left shoe of the maiden remained sticking in it. The prince picked it up, and saw that it was of gold, and very small and slender. The next morning he went to the father and told him that none should be his bride save the one whose foot the golden shoe should fit. Then the two sisters were very glad, because they had pretty feet. The eldest went to her room to try on the shoe, and her mother stood by. But she could not get her great toe into it, for the shoe was too small; then her mother handed her a knife, and said, "Cut the toe off, for when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut her toe off, squeezed her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince. Then he took her with him on his horse as his bride, and rode off. They had to pass by the grave, and there sat the two pigeons on the hazel bush, and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her shoe, and saw the blood flowing. And he turned his horse round and took the false bride home again, saying she was not the right one, and that the other sister must try on the shoe. So she went into her room to do so, and got her toes comfortably in, but her heel was too large. Then her mother handed her the knife, saying, "Cut a piece off your heel; when you are queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut a piece off her heel, and thrust her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, and went down to the prince, who took his bride before him on his horse and rode off. When they passed by the hazel bush the two pigeons sat there and cried,

"There they go, there they go!
There is blood on her shoe;
The shoe is too small,
Not the right bride at all!"

Then the prince looked at her foot, and saw how the blood was flowing from the shoe, and staining the white stocking. And he turned his horse round and brought the false bride home again. "This is not the right one," said he, "have you no other daughter?" - "No," said the man, "only my dead wife left behind her a little stunted Cinderella; it is impossible that she can be the bride." But the King's son ordered her to be sent for, but the mother said, "Oh no! she is much too dirty, I could not let her be seen." But he would have her fetched, and so Cinderella had to appear. First she washed her face and hands quite clean, and went in and curtseyed to the prince, who held out to her the golden shoe. Then she sat down on a stool, drew her foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and slipped it into the golden one, which fitted it perfectly. And when she stood up, and the prince looked in her face, he knew again the beautiful maiden that had danced with him, and he cried, "This is the right bride!" The step-mother and the two sisters were thunderstruck, and grew pale with anger; but he put Cinderella before him on his horse and rode off. And as they passed the hazel bush, the two white pigeons cried,

"There they go, there they go!
No blood on her shoe;
The shoe's not too small,
The right bride is she after all."

And when they had thus cried, they came flying after and perched on Cinderella's shoulders, one on the right, the other on the left, and so remained.

And when her wedding with the prince was appointed to be held the false sisters came, hoping to curry favour, and to take part in the festivities. So as the bridal procession went to the church, the eldest walked on the right side and the younger on the left, and the pigeons picked out an eye of each of them. And as they returned the elder was on the left side and the younger on the right, and the pigeons picked out the other eye of each of them. And so they were condemned to go blind for the rest of their days because of their wickedness and falsehood.
Pewnemu bogatemu panu zachorowała żona, a kiedy poczuła, że nadszedł jej koniec, zawołała swoją jedyną córeczkę do łóżka i rzekła: "Drogie dziecko, bądź pobożna i dobra, a dobry Bóg będzie z tobą. Będę patrzyła na ciebie z nieba i będę przy tobie." Potem zamknęła oczy i odeszła. Dziewczynka codziennie chodziła na grób matki, płakała, była pobożna i dobra. Kiedy nadeszła zima, śnieg przykrył białą chustą grób, a kiedy wiosenne słońce ją zdjęło, pan wziął sobie drugą żonę.

Kobieta zabrała do domu dwie córki, które z twarzy były śniade i piękne, ale w sercach szpetne i czarne. Dla biednej pasierbicy nastał zły czas.

"Czy ta głupia gęś ma siedzieć z nami w izbie," mówiły, "Kto chce jeść chleb, musi na niego zasłużyć. Precz do kuchni z tą dziewką!"

Zabrały jej piękne suknie i założyły stary szary fartuch i drewniane buty. "Popatrzcie no na dumną księżniczkę, jaka umorusana!" wołały, śmiały się i poprowadziły do kuchni. A tam od rana do wieczora musiała ciężko pracować i wstawać przed dniem, nosić wodę, rozpalać ogień, gotować i myć. Siostry nie szczędziły jej żadnej przykrości, szydziły z niej, sypały groch i soczewicę do popiołu, tak że musiała siedzieć i zbierać. Wieczorem, zmęczona po ciężkiej pracy nie szła do łóżka, lecz kładła się na popielisko obok pieca. A ponieważ ciągle była w kurzu i brudzie nazwano ją Kopciuszkiem.

Zdarzyło się, że ojciec szedł na targ. Zapytał wtedy swoje pasierbice, co ma im przynieść. "Piękne suknie!," powiedziała jedna; "Perły i drogie kamienie," druga. - "A ty, Kopciuszku," powiedział, "co chcesz mieć?" -"Ojcze, pierwszą gałązkę, która wam kapelusz na waszej drodze do domu z głowy strąci, ułamcie ją dla mnie."

Kupił więc obu pasierbicom piękne suknie, perły i drogie kamienie, a kiedy w drodze do domu jechał swym koniem przez zielony gaj, zaczepiła go gałązka leszczyny i strąciła mu kapelusz. Ułamał ją więc i zabrał ze sobą. Kiedy przybył do domu, dał pasierbicom, czego sobie życzyły, a kopciuszkowi gałązkę krzewu leszczyny. Kopciuszek podziękował mu, poszedł na grób matki i zasadził na nim gałązkę. Płakał tak bardzo, że łzy kapały na nią i ją zraszały. Gałązka urosła i stała się pięknym drzewem. Kopciuszek chodził pod nie co trzy dni, płakał i modlił się, a za każdym razem na drzewie siadał biały ptaszek i kiedy Kopciuszek wymawiał swoje życzenie, zrzucał mu czego chciał.

Zdarzyło się też, że król wyprawiał ucztę, która miała trwać trzy dni. Zaprosił na nią wszystkie panny w kraju, aby jego syn znalazł sobie narzeczoną. Gdy przyrodnie siostry usłyszały, że i one mają się zjawić, były dobrej myśli, zawołały kopciuszka i powiedziały: "Uczesz nam włosy, wyszczotkuj buty i zapnij klamerki, idziemy na Wesele na zamek króla."

Kopciuszek usłuchał, ale płakał, bo też chciał iść w tan na wesele i poprosił macochę, by raczyła jej na to pozwolić.

"Ty kopciuszku," rzekła, "pełna jesteś kurzu i brudu... i ty chcesz iść na wesele? Nie masz sukien ni butów, a chcesz tańczyć!" A kiedy kopciuszek przestał prosić, powiedziała: "Wysypałam ci miskę soczewicy do popiołu. Jeśli pozbierasz ją w dwie godziny, możesz z nami pójść"

Dziewczynka wyszła przez tylne drzwi do ogrodu i zawołała: "Łaskawe gołąbki, turkaweczki, wszystkie ptaszki na niebie, przylećcie by pomóc mi zbierać.

Dobre do garnuszka,
a złe do brzuszka"

I wtedy przez kuchenne okno wleciały dwa białe gołąbki, potem turkaweczki, aż wreszcie furknęły wszystkie ptaszki na niebie wlatując do kuchni, usiadły wokół popieliska, że aż się od nich zaroiło. A gołąbki kiwały swoimi główkami i zaczęły robić pik, pik, pik, a wtedy i wszystkie inne ptaszki zaczęły robić pik, pik, pik i zbierały dobre ziarenka do miski. I nie minęła nawet godzina a wszystkie były gotowe i odleciały. Dziewczynka zaniosła miskę do macochy, cieszyła się i wierzyła, że będzie mogła pójść na wesele. Ale macocha powiedziała: "Nie kopciuszku, nie masz sukien i nie umiesz tańczyć; tylko by się z ciebie śmiali."

Wtedy kopciuszek zapłakał, a macocha powiedziała "Jeśli w ciągu godziny wybierzesz z popiołu dwie miski pełne soczewicy, możesz pójść z nami, i pomyślała; "Nigdy jej się to nie uda." A kiedy wysypała dwie miski soczewicy na popielisko, dziewczynka wyszła przez tylne drzwi do ogrodu i zawołała: "Łaskawe gołąbki, turkaweczki, wszystkie ptaszki na niebie, przylećcie by pomóc mi zbierać.

Dobre do garnuszka,
a złe do brzuszka"

I wtedy przez kuchenne okno wleciały dwa białe gołąbki, potem turkaweczki, aż wreszcie furknęły wszystkie ptaszki na niebie wlatując do kuchni, usiadły wokół popieliska, że aż się od nich zaroiło. A gołąbki kiwały swoimi główkami i zaczęły robić pik, pik, pik, a wtedy i wszystkie inne ptaszki zaczęły robić pik, pik, pik i zbierały dobre ziarenka do miski. I zanim minęło pół godziny wszystkie były gotowe i odleciały. Dziewczynka zaniosła miskę do macochy, cieszyła się i wierzyła, że będzie mogła pójść na wesele. Ale macocha powiedziała: "Nie pomoże ci to. Nie pójdziesz z nami, bo nie masz sukien i nie umiesz tańczyć; wstydziłybyśmy się ciebie." Odwróciła się do Kopciuszka plecami i pospieszyła za swymi córkami.

Kiedy nikogo nie było już w domu, kopciuszek poszedł na grób swojej matki pod leszczynowym drzewem i zawołał:

"Drzewko, drzewko zrzuć na mnie oto
srebro i złoto"

A ptaszek zrzucił jej suknię ze srebra i złota i pantofle przetykane jedwabiem i srebrem. W pośpiechu kopciuszek założył suknię i poszedł na wesele. Jego siostry i macocha nie poznały go i myślały, że to królewna z dalekiego kraju, tak piękna była w swej złotej sukni. O kopciuszku nawet nie pomyślały, o Kopciuszku, który siedział w domu, w brudzie i wyszukiwał soczewicy w popiele. Królewicz podszedł do niej, wziął ją za rękę i tańczył z nią. Nie chciał tańczyć z nikim innym trzymając ją cały czas za rękę, a kiedy podszedł ktoś by poprosić ją do tańca, mówił: "To moja tancerka."

Kopciuszek tańczył do wieczora aż w końcu chciał iść do domu. Ale królewicz powiedział: "Pójdę z Tobą i odprowadzę cię," bo chciał zobaczyć, czyja była tak piękna dziewczyna. Kopciuszek jednak uciekł mu i wskoczył do gołębnika. Królewicz czekał, aż przyszedł ojciec kopciuszka i powiedział mu, że pewna nieznajoma dziewczyna wskoczyła do gołębnika. Stary pomyślał: "Czy to był mój Kopciuszek?" i musieli mu przynieść siekierę i bosak, aby mógł przeciąć gołębnik na pół. Lecz w środku nie było nikogo. Gdy weszli do domu, Kopciuszek leżał w popiele w swoim brudnym ubraniu, a w kominku paliła się ciemna olejowa lampka, Kopciuszek bowiem wyskoczył z tyłu gołębnika i pobiegł do leszczynowego drzewa. Tam zdjął swe piękne suknie i położył na grób, a ptak je zabrał. Potem położył się w swych szarych rzeczach na kuchennym popielisku.

Następnego dnia, gdy uczta znowu się zaczynała, a rodzice i przyrodnie siostry już odeszły, kopciuszek podszedł do leszczyny i rzekł:

"Drzewko, drzewko zrzuć na mnie oto
srebro i złoto"

A ptak zrzucił suknię jeszcze bardziej przepyszną niż poprzedniego dnia. Kiedy ukazał się na weselu w tej sukni, zdziwił się każdy jego urodą. Królewicz czekał aż przyjdzie by wziąć Kopciuszka za rękę i tańczyć tylko z nim, a kiedy podszedł ktoś by poprosić go do tańca, mówił: "To moja tancerka." Kiedy przyszedł zaś wieczór, Kopciuszek chciał odejść, lecz królewicz szedł za nim, bo chciał zobaczyć do jakiego pójdzie domu. Kopciuszek jednak szybko skoczył do przodu i pobiegł do ogrodu za domem, w którym stało piękne wielkie drzewo, a na nim wisiały wspaniałe gruszki. Wspiął się na nie tak zwinnie, jakby to wiewiórka wiła się wśród gałęzi, a królewicz nie wiedział, gdzie Kopciuszek poszedł. Czekał jednak, aż zjawił się ojciec i rzekł do niego: "Ta nieznajoma dziewczyna uciekła mi i - jak sądzę - wskoczyła na tę gruszę. Ojciec pomyślał: "Czy to mój Kopciuszek?" Kazał sobie wnet przynieść siekierę i ściął drzewo, lecz nie było na nim nikogo.

Gdy poszli do kuchni, Kopciuszek jak zawsze leżał na popielisku, bo zeskoczył był z drugiej strony drzewa, ptaszkowi na leszczynowym drzewie oddał piękne suknie i włożył swój szary fartuch.

Trzeciego dnia, gdy rodzice i przyrodnie siostry już poszli, Kopciuszek poszedł na grób matki i rzekł do drzewka:

"Drzewko, drzewko zrzuć na mnie oto
srebro i złoto"

A ptaszek zrzucił mu suknię, która była taka wspaniała i błyszcząca, jakiej nie miał jeszcze nikt, a pantofle całe były ze złota. Kiedy w tej sukni przyszła na wesele, nikt z zachwytu głosu z siebie dobyć nie mógł. Królewicz tańczył tylko z Kopciuszkiem, a kiedy podchodził ktoś, by poprosić kopciuszka do tańca, mówił: "To moja tancerka."

Kiedy nadszedł wieczór, Kopciuszek chciał odejść, a królewicz chciał go odprowadzić, lecz dziewczyna tak szybko znikła mu z oczu, że nie mógł iść za nią. Królewicz obmyślił jednak podstęp i kazał wysmarować całe schody smołą. Kiedy kopciuszek szedł po nich, do smoły przykleił się lewy pantofel. Królewicz podniósł go. Był mały, delikatny i cały ze złota. Rankiem podszedł do człowieka, którego spotykał co wieczór i rzekł: "żadna inna nie może zostać moją żoną niż ta, na którą będzie pasował ten złoty bucik." Ucieszyły się obie siostry, bo miały piękne nogi.

Najstarsza poszła z butem do izby i chciała go przymierzyć, a była przy tym matka. Nie mogła jednak zmiścić wielkiego palca, bo but był na nią za mały. Wtedy matka podała jej nóż i rzekła: "Odetnij tego palca: Kiedy będziesz królową, nie będziesz musiała chodzić pieszo." Dziewczyna obcięła palca, wcisnęła stopę w buta, a z bólu zacisnęła usta i wyszła do królewicza. Potem wziął ją jako narzeczoną na konia i odjechał. Musieli przejechać koło grobu, gdzie siedziały dwa gołąbki na leszczynowym drzewku i wołały:

Pewnie wzrok z ciebie drwi,
Bo buty pełne są krwi.
Oczy oszukać się dały,
Bo but jest dużo za mały.
Prawdziwa panna jest w domu
Nieznana jeszcze nikomu.

Spojrzał więc na nogę i zobaczył, jak tryska krew. Zawrócił konia i odwiózł fałszywą narzeczoną do domu. Druga siostra musiała przymierzyć buta. Poszła więc do izby, szczęśliwa włożyła palce do buta, lecz pięta była za duża. Wtedy matka podała jej nóż i rzekła: "Odetnij kawałek pięty: Kiedy będziesz królową, nie będziesz musiała chodzić pieszo." Dziewczyna obcięła kawałek pięty, wcisnęła stopę w buta, a z bólu zacisnęła usta i wyszła do królewicza.

On zaś wziął ją jako narzeczoną na konia i odjechał. Kiedy przejeżdżali obok leszczynowego drzewka, dwa gołąbki zawołały:

"Pewnie wzrok z ciebie drwi,
Bo buty pełne są krwi.
Oczy oszukać się dały,
Bo but jest dużo za mały.
Prawdziwa panna jest w domu
Nieznana jeszcze nikomu."

Spojrzał na jej stopę i zobaczył, jak krew tryska z buta, a po białych pończochach sączy się do góry i barwi je na czerwono. Zawrócił więc konia i odwiózł fałszywą narzeczoną do domu.

"Nie o nią mi chodziło," powiedział., "Czy macie jeszcze jakąś córkę?"
"Nie," odrzekł pan, "Jest jeszcze tylko mój mały lichy Kopciuszek po mojej zmarłej żonie, ale on na pewno nie jest tą panną."

Królewicz powiedział, że mają ją przysłać, a matka odpowiedziała: "Och nie, ona jest zbyt brudna i nie może się taka pokazać." Ale on chciał koniecznie ją zobaczyć i musieli ją zawołać. Kopciuszek umył sobie najpierw ręce i twarz, a potem poszedł pokłonić się królewiczowi, który podał mu złoty but. Potem usiadł na zydelku, zdjął ciężkiego drewniaka, i włożył pantofelek, który leżał jak ulał. A kiedy wstał, królewicz ujrzał jego twarz i poznał piękną dziewczynę, która z nim tańczyła i zawołał: "Oto prawdziwa panna!"

Macocha i obie siostry wystraszyły się i zbladły ze złości. A on wziął Kopciuszka na konia i odjechał z nim. Kiedy przejeżdżali obok leszczynowego drzewka, zawołały dwa gołąbki:

"Widoku nic nie psuje
Bo bucik pięknie pasuje
Nie barwi go krew czerwona,
Bo panną młodą zaprawdę jest ona."

A kiedy to zawołały, usiadły Kopciuszkowi na ramionach, jeden z prawej, a drugi z lewej strony i tak zostały.

Kiedy miał odbyć się ślub z królewiczem, przyszły fałszywe siostry i chciały się przypodobać, by mieć swój udział w szczęściu Kopciuszka. Kiedy narzeczeni wchodzili do kościoła, starsza była z prawej strony, a młodsza z lewej. I wtedy gołębie wydziobały każdej po tym właśnie oku. Kiedy zaś wychodzili, starsza była z lewej a młodsza z prawej, gołębie wydziobały każdej po drugim oku. I tak zostały ukarane ślepotą po kres życia za swe zło i fałsz.

Tłumaczył Jacek Fijołek, © Jacek Fijołek




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.