Compare two languages:




ENGLISH

Snow-white

DEUTSCH

Schneewittchen


It was the middle of winter, and the snow-flakes were falling like feathers from the sky, and a queen sat at her window working, and her embroidery-frame was of ebony. And as she worked, gazing at times out on the snow, she pricked her finger, and there fell from it three drops of blood on the snow. And when she saw how bright and red it looked, she said to herself, "Oh that I had a child as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the embroidery frame!" Not very long after she had a daughter, with a skin as white as snow, lips as red as blood, and hair as black as ebony, and she was named Snow-white. And when she was born the queen died. After a year had gone by the king took another wife, a beautiful woman, but proud and overbearing, and she could not bear to be surpassed in beauty by any one. She had a magic looking-glass, and she used to stand before it, and look in it, and say,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the looking-glass would answer,

"You are fairest of them all."

And she was contented, for she knew that the looking-glass spoke the truth. Now, Snow-white was growing prettier and prettier, and when she was seven years old she was as beautiful as day, far more so than the queen herself. So one day when the queen went to her mirror and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

It answered,

"Queen, you are full fair, 'tis true,
But Snow-white fairer is than you."

This gave the queen a great shock, and she became yellow and green with envy, and from that hour her heart turned against Snow-white, and she hated her. And envy and pride like ill weeds grew in her heart higher every day, until she had no peace day or night. At last she sent for a huntsman, and said, "Take the child out into the woods, so that I may set eyes on her no more. You must put her to death, and bring me her heart for a token." The huntsman consented, and led her away; but when he drew his cutlass to pierce Snow-white's innocent heart, she began to weep, and to say, "Oh, dear huntsman, do not take my life; I will go away into the wild wood, and never come home again." And as she was so lovely the huntsman had pity on her, and said, "Away with you then, poor child;" for he thought the wild animals would be sure to devour her, and it was as if a stone had been rolled away from his heart when he spared to put her to death. Just at that moment a young wild boar came running by, so he caught and killed it, and taking out its heart, he brought it to the queen for a token. And it was salted and cooked, and the wicked woman ate it up, thinking that there was an end of Snow-white.

Now, when the poor child found herself quite alone in the wild woods, she felt full of terror, even of the very leaves on the trees, and she did not know what to do for fright. Then she began to run over the sharp stones and through the thorn bushes, and the wild beasts after her, but they did her no harm. She ran as long as her feet would carry her; and when the evening drew near she came to a little house, and she went inside to rest. Everything there was very small, but as pretty and clean as possible. There stood the little table ready laid, and covered with a white cloth, and seven little plates, and seven knives and forks, and drinking-cups. By the wall stood seven little beds, side by side, covered with clean white quilts. Snow-white, being very hungry and thirsty, ate from each plate a little porridge and bread, and drank out of each little cup a drop of wine, so as not to finish up one portion alone. After that she felt so tired that she lay down on one of the beds, but it did not seem to suit her; one was too long, another too short, but at last the seventh was quite right; and so she lay down upon it, committed herself to heaven, and fell asleep.

When it was quite dark, the masters of the house came home. They were seven dwarfs, whose occupation was to dig underground among the mountains. When they had lighted their seven candles, and it was quite light in the little house, they saw that some one must have been in, as everything was not in the same order in which they left it. The first said, "Who has been sitting in my little chair?" The second said, "Who has been eating from my little plate?" The third said, "Who has been taking my little loaf?" The fourth said, "Who has been tasting my porridge?" The fifth said, "Who has been using my little fork?" The sixth said, "Who has been cutting with my little knife?" The seventh said, "Who has been drinking from my little cup?" Then the first one, looking round, saw a hollow in his bed, and cried, "Who has been lying on my bed?" And the others came running, and cried, "Some one has been on our beds too!" But when the seventh looked at his bed, he saw little Snow-white lying there asleep. Then he told the others, who came running up, crying out in their astonishment, and holding up their seven little candles to throw a light upon Snow-white. "O goodness! O gracious!" cried they, "what beautiful child is this?" and were so full of joy to see her that they did not wake her, but let her sleep on. And the seventh dwarf slept with his comrades, an hour at a time with each, until the night had passed. When it was morning, and Snow-white awoke and saw the seven dwarfs, she was very frightened; but they seemed quite friendly, and asked her what her name was, and she told them; and then they asked how she came to be in their house. And she related to them how her step-mother had wished her to be put to death, and how the huntsman had spared her life, and how she had run the whole day long, until at last she had found their little house. Then the dwarfs said, "If you will keep our house for us, and cook, and wash, and make the beds, and sew and knit, and keep everything tidy and clean, you may stay with us, and you shall lack nothing." - "With all my heart," said Snow-white; and so she stayed, and kept the house in good order. In the morning the dwarfs went to the mountain to dig for gold; in the evening they came home, and their supper had to be ready for them. All the day long the maiden was left alone, and the good little dwarfs warned her, saying, "Beware of your step-mother, she will soon know you are here. Let no one into the house." Now the queen, having eaten Snow-white's heart, as she supposed, felt quite sure that now she was the first and fairest, and so she came to her mirror, and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the glass answered,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

Then she was very angry, for the glass always spoke the truth, and she knew that the huntsman must have deceived her, and that Snow-white must still be living. And she thought and thought how she could manage to make an end of her, for as long as she was not the fairest in the land, envy left her no rest. At last she thought of a plan; she painted her face and dressed herself like an old pedlar woman, so that no one would have known her. In this disguise she went across the seven mountains, until she came to the house of the seven little dwarfs, and she knocked at the door and cried, "Fine wares to sell! fine wares to sell!" Snow-white peeped out of the window and cried, "Good-day, good woman, what have you to sell?" - "Good wares, fine wares," answered she, "laces of all colours;"and she held up a piece that was woven of variegated silk. "I need not be afraid of letting in this good woman," thought Snow-white, and she unbarred the door and bought the pretty lace. "What a figure you are, child!" said the old woman, "come and let me lace you properly for once." Snow-white, suspecting nothing, stood up before her, and let her lace her with the new lace; but the old woman laced so quick and tight that it took Snow-white's breath away, and she fell down as dead. "Now you have done with being the fairest," said the old woman as she hastened away. Not long after that, towards evening, the seven dwarfs came home, and were terrified to see their dear Snow-white lying on the ground, without life or motion; they raised her up, and when they saw how tightly she was laced they cut the lace in two; then she began to draw breath, and little by little she returned to life. When the dwarfs heard what had happened they said, "The old pedlar woman was no other than the wicked queen; you must beware of letting any one in when we are not here!" And when the wicked woman got home she went to her glass and said,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And it answered as before,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

When she heard that she was so struck with surprise that all the blood left her heart, for she knew that Snow-white must still be living. "But now," said she, "I will think of something that will be her ruin." And by witchcraft she made a poisoned comb. Then she dressed herself up to look like another different sort of old woman. So she went across the seven mountains and came to the house of the seven dwarfs, and knocked at the door and cried, "Good wares to sell! good wares to sell!" Snow-white looked out and said, "Go away, I must not let anybody in." - "But you are not forbidden to look," said the old woman, taking out the poisoned comb and holding it up. It pleased the poor child so much that she was tempted to open the door; and when the bargain was made the old woman said, "Now, for once your hair shall be properly combed." Poor Snow-white, thinking no harm, let the old woman do as she would, but no sooner was the comb put in her hair than the poison began to work, and the poor girl fell down senseless. "Now, you paragon of beauty," said the wicked woman, "this is the end of you," and went off. By good luck it was now near evening, and the seven little dwarfs came home. When they saw Snow-white lying on the ground as dead, they thought directly that it was the step-mother's doing, and looked about, found the poisoned comb, and no sooner had they drawn it out of her hair than Snow-white came to herself, and related all that had passed. Then they warned her once more to be on her guard, and never again to let any one in at the door. And the queen went home and stood before the looking-glass and said,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

And the looking-glass answered as before,

"Queen, thou art of beauty rare,
But Snow-white living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair."

When she heard the looking-glass speak thus she trembled and shook with anger. "Snow-white shall die," cried she, "though it should cost me my own life!" And then she went to a secret lonely chamber, where no one was likely to come, and there she made a poisonous apple. It was beautiful to look upon, being white with red cheeks, so that any one who should see it must long for it, but whoever ate even a little bit of it must die. When the apple was ready she painted her face and clothed herself like a peasant woman, and went across the seven mountains to where the seven dwarfs lived. And when she knocked at the door Snow-white put her head out of the window and said, "I dare not let anybody in; the seven dwarfs told me not." - "All right," answered the woman; "I can easily get rid of my apples elsewhere. There, I will give you one." - "No," answered Snow-white, "I dare not take anything." - "Are you afraid of poison?" said the woman, "look here, I will cut the apple in two pieces; you shall have the red side, I will have the white one." For the apple was so cunningly made, that all the poison was in the rosy half of it. Snow-white longed for the beautiful apple, and as she saw the peasant woman eating a piece of it she could no longer refrain, but stretched out her hand and took the poisoned half. But no sooner had she taken a morsel of it into her mouth than she fell to the earth as dead. And the queen, casting on her a terrible glance, laughed aloud and cried, "As white as snow, as red as blood, as black as ebony! this time the dwarfs will not be able to bring you to life again." And when she went home and asked the looking-glass,

"Looking-glass against the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

at last it answered,

"You are the fairest now of all."

Then her envious heart had peace, as much as an envious heart can have. The dwarfs, when they came home in the evening, found Snow-white lying on the ground, and there came no breath out of her mouth, and she was dead. They lifted her up, sought if anything poisonous was to be found, cut her laces, combed her hair, washed her with water and wine, but all was of no avail, the poor child was dead, and remained dead. Then they laid her on a bier, and sat all seven of them round it, and wept and lamented three whole days. And then they would have buried her, but that she looked still as if she were living, with her beautiful blooming cheeks. So they said, "We cannot hide her away in the black ground." And they had made a coffin of clear glass, so as to be looked into from all sides, and they laid her in it, and wrote in golden letters upon it her name, and that she was a king's daughter. Then they set the coffin out upon the mountain, and one of them always remained by it to watch. And the birds came too, and mourned for Snow-white, first an owl, then a raven, and lastly, a dove. Now, for a long while Snow-white lay in the coffin and never changed, but looked as if she were asleep, for she was still as' white as snow, as red as blood, and her hair was as black as ebony. It happened, however, that one day a king's son rode through the wood and up to the dwarfs' house, which was near it. He saw on the mountain the coffin, and beautiful Snow-white within it, and he read what was written in golden letters upon it. Then he said to the dwarfs, "Let me have the coffin, and I will give you whatever you like to ask for it." But the dwarfs told him that they could not part with it for all the gold in the world. But he said, "I beseech you to give it me, for I cannot live without looking upon Snow-white; if you consent I will bring you to great honour, and care for you as if you were my brethren." When he so spoke the good little dwarfs had pity upon him and gave him the coffin, and the king's son called his servants and bid them carry it away on their shoulders. Now it happened that as they were going along they stumbled over a bush, and with the shaking the bit of poisoned apple flew out of her throat. It was not long before she opened her eyes, threw up the cover of the coffin, and sat up, alive and well. "Oh dear! where am I?" cried she. The king's son answered, full of joy, "You are near me," and, relating all that had happened, he said, "I would rather have you than anything in the world; come with me to my father's castle and you shall be my bride." And Snow-white was kind, and went with him, and their wedding was held with pomp and great splendour. But Snow-white's wicked step-mother was also bidden to the feast, and when she had dressed herself in beautiful clothes she went to her looking-glass and said,

"Looking-glass upon the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?"

The looking-glass answered,

''O Queen, although you are of beauty rare,
The young bride is a thousand times more fair."

Then she railed and cursed, and was beside herself with disappointment and anger. First she thought she would not go to the wedding; but then she felt she should have no peace until she went and saw the bride. And when she saw her she knew her for Snow-white, and could not stir from the place for anger and terror. For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead.
Es war einmal mitten im Winter, und die Schneeflocken fielen wie Federn vom Himmel herab. Da sass eine Königin an einem Fenster, das einen Rahmen von schwarzem Ebenholz hatte, und nähte. Und wie sie so nähte und nach dem Schnee aufblickte, stach sie sich mit der Nadel in den Finger, und es fielen drei Tropfen Blut in den Schnee. Und weil das Rote im weissen Schnee so schön aussah, dachte sie bei sich: Hätt' ich ein Kind, so weiss wie Schnee, so rot wie Blut und so schwarz wie das Holz an dem Rahmen! Bald darauf bekam sie ein Töchterlein, das war so weiss wie Schnee, so rot wie Blut und so schwarzhaarig wie Ebenholz und ward darum Schneewittchen (Schneeweisschen) genannt. Und wie das Kind geboren war, starb die Königin. Über ein Jahr nahm sich der König eine andere Gemahlin. Es war eine schöne Frau, aber sie war stolz und übermütig und konnte nicht leiden, dass sie an Schönheit von jemand sollte übertroffen werden. Sie hatte einen wunderbaren Spiegel wenn sie vor den trat und sich darin beschaute, sprach sie:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

so antwortete der Spiegel:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste im Land."

Da war sie zufrieden, denn sie wusste, dass der Spiegel die Wahrheit sagte. Schneewittchen aber wuchs heran und wurde immer schöner, und als es sieben Jahre alt war, war es so schön, wie der klare Tag und schöner als die Königin selbst. Als diese einmal ihren Spiegel fragte:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

so antwortete er:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier,
Aber Schneewittchen ist tausendmal schöner als Ihr."

Da erschrak die Königin und ward gelb und grün vor Neid. Von Stund an, wenn sie Schneewittchen erblickte, kehrte sich ihr das Herz im Leibe herum - so hasste sie das Mädchen. Und der Neid und Hochmut wuchsen wie ein Unkraut in ihrem Herzen immer höher, dass sie Tag und Nacht keine Ruhe mehr hatte. Da rief sie einen Jäger und sprach: "Bring das Kind hinaus in den Wald, ich will's nicht mehr vor meinen Augen sehen. Du sollst es töten und mir Lunge und Leber zum Wahrzeichen mitbringen." Der Jäger gehorchte und führte es hinaus, und als er den Hirschfänger gezogen hatte und Schneewittchens unschuldiges Herz durchbohren wollte, fing es an zu weinen und sprach: "Ach, lieber Jäger, lass mir mein Leben! Ich will in den wilden Wald laufen und nimmermehr wieder heimkommen." Und weil es gar so schön war, hatte der Jäger Mitleiden und sprach: "So lauf hin, du armes Kind!" Die wilden Tiere werden dich bald gefressen haben, dachte er, und doch war's ihm, als wäre ein Stein von seinem Herzen gewälzt, weil er es nicht zu töten brauchte. Und als gerade ein junger Frischling dahergesprungen kam, stach er ihn ab, nahm Lunge und Leber heraus und brachte sie als Wahrzeichen der Königin mit. Der Koch musste sie in Salz kochen, und das boshafte Weib ass sie auf und meinte, sie hätte Schneewittchens Lunge und Leber gegessen.

Nun war das arme Kind in dem grossen Wald mutterseelenallein, und ward ihm so angst, dass es alle Blätter an den Bäumen ansah und nicht wusste, wie es sich helfen sollte. Da fing es an zu laufen und lief über die spitzen Steine und durch die Dornen, und die wilden Tiere sprangen an ihm vorbei, aber sie taten ihm nichts. Es lief, so lange nur die Füsse noch fortkonnten, bis es bald Abend werden wollte. Da sah es ein kleines Häuschen und ging hinein, sich zu ruhen. In dem Häuschen war alles klein, aber so zierlich und reinlich, dass es nicht zu sagen ist. Da stand ein weissgedecktes Tischlein mit sieben kleinen Tellern, jedes Tellerlein mit seinem Löffelein, ferner sieben Messerlein und Gäblelein und sieben Becherlein. An der Wand waren sieben Bettlein nebeneinander aufgestellt und schneeweisse Laken darüber gedeckt. Schneewittchen, weil es so hungrig und durstig war, ass von jedem Tellerlein ein wenig Gemüs' und Brot und trank aus jedem Becherlein einen Tropfen Wein; denn es wollte nicht einem alles wegnehmen. Hernach, weil es so müde war, legte es sich in ein Bettchen, aber keins passte; das eine war zu lang, das andere zu kurz, bis endlich das siebente recht war; und darin blieb es liegen, befahl sich Gott und schlief ein.

Als es ganz dunkel geworden war, kamen die Herren von dem Häuslein, das waren die sieben Zwerge, die in den Bergen nach Erz hackten und gruben. Sie zündeten ihre sieben Lichtlein an, und wie es nun hell im Häuslein ward, sahen sie, dass jemand darin gesessen war, denn es stand nicht alles so in der Ordnung, wie sie es verlassen hatten. Der erste sprach: "Wer hat auf meinem Stühlchen gesessen?' Der zweite: "Wer hat von meinem Tellerchen gegessen?" Der dritte: "Wer hat von meinem Brötchen genommen?" Der vierte: "Wer hat von meinem Gemüschen gegessen?" Der fünfte: "Wer hat mit meinem Gäbelchen gestochen?" Der sechste: "Wer hat mit meinem Messerchen geschnitten?" Der siebente: "Wer hat aus meinem Becherlein Getrunken?" Dann sah sich der erste um und sah, dass auf seinem Bett eine kleine Delle war, da sprach er: "Wer hat in mein Bettchen getreten?" Die anderen kamen gelaufen und riefen: "In meinem hat auch jemand Gelegen!" Der siebente aber, als er in sein Bett sah, erblickte Schneewittchen, das lag darin und schlief. Nun rief er die andern, die kamen herbeigelaufen und schrien vor Verwunderung, holten ihre sieben Lichtlein und beleuchteten Schneewittchen. "Ei, du mein Gott! Ei, du mein Gott!" riefen sie, "was ist das Kind so schön!" Und hatten so grosse Freude, dass sie es nicht aufweckten, sondern im Bettlein fortschlafen liessen. Der siebente Zwerg aber schlief bei seinen Gesellen, bei jedem eine Stunde, da war die Nacht herum. Als es Morgen war, erwachte Schneewittchen, und wie es die sieben Zwerge sah, erschrak es. Sie waren aber freundlich und fragten: "Wie heisst du?" - "Ich heisse Schneewittchen," antwortete es. "Wie bist du in unser Haus gekommen?" sprachen weiter die Zwerge. Da erzählte es ihnen, dass seine Stiefmutter es hätte wollen umbringen lassen, der Jäger hätte ihm aber das Leben geschenkt, und da wär' es gelaufen den ganzen Tag, bis es endlich ihr Häuslein gefunden hätte. Die Zwerge sprachen: "Willst du unsern Haushalt versehen, kochen, betten, waschen, nähen und stricken, und willst du alles ordentlich und reinlich halten, so kannst du bei uns bleiben, und es soll dir an nichts fehlen." - "Jaa, sagte Schneewittchen, "von Herzen gern!" und blieb bei ihnen. Es hielt ihnen das Haus in Ordnung. Morgens gingen sie in die Berge und suchten Erz und Gold, abends kamen sie wieder, und da musste ihr Essen bereit sein. Den ganzen Tag über war das Mädchen allein; da warnten es die guten Zwerglein und sprachen: "Hüte dich vor deiner Stiefmutter, die wird bald wissen, dass du hier bist; lass ja niemand herein! Die Königin aber, nachdem sie Schneewittchens Lunge und Leber glaubte gegessen zu haben, dachte nicht anders, als sie wäre wieder die Erste und Allerschönste, trat vor ihren Spiegel und sprach:

"Spieglein, Spieglein. an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

Da antwortete der Spiegel:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier,
Aber Schneewittchen über den Bergen
Bei den sieben Zwergen
Ist noch tausendmal schöner als Ihr."

Da erschrak sie, denn sie wusste, dass der Spiegel keine Unwahrheit sprach, und merkte, dass der Jäger sie betrogen hatte und Schneewittchen noch am Leben war. Und da sann und sann sie aufs neue, wie sie es umbringen wollte; denn so lange sie nicht die Schönste war im ganzen Land, liess ihr der Neid keine Ruhe. Und als sie sich endlich etwas ausgedacht hatte, färbte sie sich das Gesicht und kleidete sich wie eine alte Krämerin und war ganz unkenntlich. In dieser Gestalt ging sie über die sieben Berge zu den sieben Zwergen, klopfte an die Türe und rief: "Schöne Ware feil! feil!" Schneewittchen guckte zum Fenster hinaus und rief: "Guten Tag, liebe Frau! Was habt Ihr zu verkaufen?" - "Gute Ware," antwortete sie, "Schnürriemen von allen Farben," und holte einen hervor, der aus bunter Seide geflochten war. Die ehrliche Frau kann ich hereinlassen, dachte Schneewittchen, riegelte die Türe auf und kaufte sich den hübschen Schnürriemen. "Kind," sprach die Alte, "wie du aussiehst! Komm, ich will dich einmal ordentlich schnüren." Schneewittchen hatte kein Arg, stellte sich vor sie und liess sich mit dem neuen Schnürriemen schnüren. Aber die Alte schnürte geschwind und schnürte so fest, dass dem Schneewittchen der Atem verging und es für tot hinfiel. "Nun bist du die Schönste gewesen," sprach sie und eilte hinaus. Nicht lange darauf, zur Abendzeit, kamen die sieben Zwerge nach Haus; aber wie erschraken sie, als sie ihr liebes Schneewittchen auf der Erde liegen sahen, und es regte und bewegte sich nicht, als wäre es tot. Sie hoben es in die Höhe, und weil sie sahen, dass es zu fest geschnürt war, schnitten sie den Schnürriemen entzwei; da fing es an ein wenig zu atmen und ward nach und nach wieder lebendig. Als die Zwerge hörten, was geschehen war, sprachen sie: "Die alte Krämerfrau war niemand als die gottlose Königin. Hüte dich und lass keinen Menschen herein, wenn wir nicht bei dir sind!" Das böse Weib aber, als es nach Haus gekommen war, ging vor den Spiegel und fragte:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

Da antwortete er wie sonst:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier,
Aber Schneewittchen über den Bergen
Bei den sieben Zwergen
Ist noch tausendmal schöner als Ihr."

Als sie das hörte, lief ihr alles Blut zum Herzen, so erschrak sie, 'denn sie sah wohl, dass Schneewittchen wieder lebendig geworden war. "Nun aber," sprach sie," will ich etwas aussinnen, das dich- zugrunde richten soll," und mit Hexenkünsten, die sie verstand, machte sie einen giftigen Kamm. Dann verkleidete sie sich und nahm die Gestalt eines anderen alten Weibes an. So ging sie hin über die sieben Berge zu den sieben Zwergen, klopfte an die Türe und rief: "Gute Ware feil! feil!" Schneewittchen schaute heraus und sprach: "Geht nur weiter, ich darf niemand hereinlassen!" - "Das Ansehen wird dir doch erlaubt sein," sprach die Alte, zog den giftigen Kamm heraus und hielt ihn in die Höhe. Da gefiel er dem Kinde so gut, dass es sich betören liess und die Türe öffnete. Als sie des Kaufs einig waren, sprach die Alte: "Nun will ich dich einmal ordentlich kämmen." Das arme Schneewittchen dachte an nichts, liess die Alte gewähren, aber kaum hatte sie den Kamm in die Haare gesteckt, als das Gift darin wirkte und das Mädchen ohne Besinnung niederfiel. "Du Ausbund von Schönheit," sprach das boshafte Weib, "jetzt ist's um dich geschehen," und ging fort. Zum Glück aber war es bald Abend, wo die sieben Zwerglein nach Haus kamen. Als sie Schneewittchen wie tot auf der Erde liegen sahen, hatten sie gleich die Stiefmutter in Verdacht, suchten nach und fanden den giftigen Kamm. Und kaum hatten sie ihn herausgezogen, so kam Schneewittchen wieder zu sich und erzählte, was vorgegangen war. Da warnten sie es noch einmal, auf seiner Hut zu sein und niemand die Türe zu öffnen. Die Königin stellte sich daheim vor den Spiegel und sprach:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

Da antwortete er wie vorher:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier,
Aber Schneewittchen über den Bergen
Bei den sieben Zwergen
Ist noch tausendmal schöner als Ihr."

Als sie den Spiegel so reden hörte, zitterte und bebte sie vor Zorn. ,Schneewittchen soll sterben," rief sie, "und wenn es mein eigenes Leben kostet!" Darauf ging sie in eine ganz verborgene, einsame Kammer, wo niemand hinkam, und machte da einen giftigen, giftigen Apfel. Äusserlich sah er schön aus, weiss mit roten Backen, dass jeder, der ihn erblickte, Lust danach bekam, aber wer ein Stückchen davon ass, der musste sterben. Als der Apfel fertig war, färbte sie sich das Gesicht und verkleidete sich in eine Bauersfrau, und so ging sie über die sieben Berge zu den sieben Zwergen. Sie klopfte an. Schneewittchen streckte den Kopf zum Fenster heraus und sprach: " Ich darf keinen Menschen einlassen, die sieben Zwerge haben mir's verboten!" - "Mir auch recht," antwortete die Bäuerin, "meine Äpfel will ich schon loswerden. Da, e i n e n will ich dir schenken." - "Nein," sprach Schneewittchen, "ich darf nichts annehmen!" - "Fürchtest du dich vor Gift?" sprach die Alte, "siehst du, da schneide ich den Apfel in zwei Teile; den roten Backen iss, den weissen will ich essen " Der Apfel war aber so künstlich gemacht, dass der rote Backen allein vergiftet war. Schneewittchen lusterte den schönen Apfel an, und als es sah, dass die Bäuerin davon ass, so konnte es nicht länger widerstehen, streckte die Hand hinaus und nahm die giftige Hälfte. Kaum aber hatte es einen Bissen davon im Mund, so fiel es tot zur Erde nieder. Da betrachtete es die Königin mit grausigen Blicken und lachte überlaut und sprach: "Weiss wie Schnee, rot wie Blut, schwarz wie Ebenholz! Diesmal können dich die Zwerge nicht wieder erwecken." Und als sie daheim den Spiegel befragte:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

so antwortete er endlich:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste im Land."

Da hatte ihr neidisches Herz Ruhe, so gut ein neidisches Herz Ruhe haben kann.

Die Zwerglein, wie sie abends nach Haus kamen, fanden Schneewittchen auf der Erde liegen, und es ging kein Atem mehr aus seinem Mund, und es war tot. Sie hoben es auf suchten, ob sie was Giftiges fänden, schnürten es auf, kämmten ihm die Haare, wuschen es mit Wasser und Wein, aber es half alles nichts; das liebe Kind war tot und blieb tot. Sie legten es auf eine Bahre und setzten sich alle siebene daran und beweinten es und weinten drei Tage lang. Da wollten sie es begraben, aber es sah noch so frisch aus wie ein lebender Mensch und hatte noch seine schönen, roten Backen. Sie sprachen: "Das können wir nicht in die schwarze Erde versenken," und liessen einen durchsichtigen Sarg von Glas machen, dass man es von allen Seiten sehen konnte, legten es hinein und schrieben mit goldenen Buchstaben seinen Namen darauf und dass es eine Königstochter wäre. Dann setzten sie den Sarg hinaus auf den Berg, und einer von ihnen blieb immer dabei und bewachte ihn. Und die Tiere kamen auch und beweinten Schneewittchen, erst eine Eule dann ein Rabe. zuletzt ein Täubchen. Nun lag Schneewittchen lange, lange Zeit in dem Sarg und verweste nicht, sondern sah aus, als wenn es schliefe, denn es war noch so weiss wie Schnee, so rot wie Blut und so schwarzhaarig wie Ebenholz. Es geschah aber, dass ein Königssohn in den Wald geriet und zu dem Zwergenhaus kam, da zu übernachten. Er sah auf dem Berg den Sarg und das schöne Schneewittchen darin und las, was mit goldenen Buchstaben darauf geschrieben war. Da sprach er zu den Zwergen: "Lasst mir den Sarg, ich will euch geben, was ihr dafür haben wollt " Aber die Zwerge antworteten: "Wir geben ihn nicht für alles Gold in der Welt." Da sprach er: "So schenkt mir ihn, denn ich kann nicht leben, ohne Schneewittchen zu sehen, ich will es ehren und hochachten wie mein Liebstes." Wie er so sprach, empfanden die guten Zwerglein Mitleid mit ihm und gaben ihm den Sarg. Der Königssohn liess ihn nun von seinen Dienern auf den Schultern forttragen. Da geschah es, dass sie über einen Strauch stolperten, und von dem Schüttern fuhr der giftige Apfelgrütz, den Schneewittchen abgebissen hatte, aus dem Hals. Und nicht lange, so öffnete es die Augen, hob den Deckel vom Sarg in die Höhe und richtete sich auf und war wieder lebendig. "Ach Gott, wo bin ich?" rief es. Der Königssohn sagte voll Freude: "Du bist bei mir," und erzählte, was sich zugetragen hatte, und sprach: "Ich habe dich lieber als alles auf der Welt; komm mit mir in meines Vaters Schloss, du sollst meine Gemahlin werden." Da war ihm Schneewittchen gut und ging mit ihm, und ihre Hochzeit ward mit grosser Pracht und Herrlichkeit angeordnet. Zu dem Feste wurde aber auch Schneewittchens gottlose Stiefmutter eingeladen. Wie sie sich nun mit schönen Kleidern angetan hatte, trat sie vor den Spiegel und sprach:

"Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand,
Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?"

Der Spiegel antwortete:

"Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier,
Aber die junge Königin ist noch tausendmal schöner als ihr."

Da stiess das böse Weib einen Fluch aus, und ward ihr so angst, so angst, dass sie sich nicht zu lassen wusste. Sie wollte zuerst gar nicht auf die Hochzeit kommen, doch liess es ihr keine Ruhe, sie musste fort und die junge Königin sehen. Und wie sie hineintrat, erkannte sie Schneewittchen, und vor Angst und Schrecken stand sie da und konnte sich nicht regen. Aber es waren schon eiserne Pantoffel über Kohlenfeuer gestellt und wurden mit Zangen hereingetragen und vor sie hingestellt. Da musste sie in die rotglühenden Schuhe treten und so lange tanzen, bis sie tot zur Erde fiel.