ENGLISH

The hut in the forest

ESPAÑOL

La casa del bosque


A poor wood-cutter lived with his wife and three daughters in a little hut on the edge of a lonely forest. One morning as he was about to go to his work, he said to his wife, "Let my dinner be brought into the forest to me by my eldest daughter, or I shall never get my work done, and in order that she may not miss her way," he added, "I will take a bag of millet with me and strew the seeds on the path." When, therefore, the sun was just above the center of the forest, the girl set out on her way with a bowl of soup, but the field-sparrows, and wood-sparrows, larks and finches, blackbirds and siskins had picked up the millet long before, and the girl could not find the track. Then trusting to chance, she went on and on, until the sun sank and night began to fall. The trees rustled in the darkness, the owls hooted, and she began to be afraid. Then in the distance she perceived a light which glimmered between the trees. "There ought to be some people living there, who can take me in for the night," thought she, and went up to the light. It was not long before she came to a house the windows of which were all lighted up. She knocked, and a rough voice from inside cried, "Come in." The girl stepped into the dark entrance, and knocked at the door of the room. "Just come in," cried the voice, and when she opened the door, an old gray-haired man was sitting at the table, supporting his face with both hands, and his white beard fell down over the table almost as far as the ground. By the stove lay three animals, a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. The girl told her story to the old man, and begged for shelter for the night. The man said,
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," answered the animals, and that must have meant, "We are willing," for the old man said, "Here you shall have shelter and food, go to the fire, and cook us our supper." The girl found in the kitchen abundance of everything, and cooked a good supper, but had no thought of the animals. She carried the full dishes to the table, seated herself by the gray-haired man, ate and satisfied her hunger. When she had had enough, she said, "But now I am tired, where is there a bed in which I can lie down, and sleep?" The animals replied,
"Thou hast eaten with him,
Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
So find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
Then said the old man, "Just go upstairs, and thou wilt find a room with two beds, shake them up, and put white linen on them, and then I, too, will come and lie down to sleep." The girl went up, and when she had shaken the beds and put clean sheets on, she lay down in one of them without waiting any longer for the old man. After some time, however, the gray-haired man came, took his candle, looked at the girl and shook his head. When he saw that she had fallen into a sound sleep, he opened a trap-door, and let her down into the cellar.
Late at night the wood-cutter came home, and reproached his wife for leaving him to hunger all day. "It is not my fault," she replied, "the girl went out with your dinner, and must have lost herself, but she is sure to come back to-morrow." The wood-cutter, however, arose before dawn to go into the forest, and requested that the second daughter should take him his dinner that day. "I will take a bag with lentils," said he; "the seeds are larger than millet, the girl will see them better, and can't lose her way." At dinner-time, therefore, the girl took out the food, but the lentils had disappeared. The birds of the forest had picked them up as they had done the day before, and had left none. The girl wandered about in the forest until night, and then she too reached the house of the old man, was told to go in, and begged for food and a bed. The man with the white beard again asked the animals,


"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals again replied "Duks," and everything happened just as it had happened the day before. The girl cooked a good meal, ate and drank with the old man, and did not concern herself about the animals, and when she inquired about her bed they answered,

"Thou hast eaten with him, Thou hast drunk with him,
Thou hast had no thought for us,
To find out for thyself where thou canst pass the night."
When she was asleep the old man came, looked at her, shook his head, and let her down into the cellar.
On the third morning the wood-cutter said to his wife, "Send our youngest child out with my dinner to-day, she has always been good and obedient, and will stay in the right path, and not run about after every wild humble-bee, as her sisters did." The mother did not want to do it, and said, "Am I to lose my dearest child, as well?"

"Have no fear,' he replied, "the girl will not go astray; she is too prudent and sensible; besides I will take some peas with me, and strew them about. They are still larger than lentils, and will show her the way." But when the girl went out with her basket on her arm, the wood-pigeons had already got all the peas in their crops, and she did not know which way she was to turn. She was full of sorrow and never ceased to think how hungry her father would be, and how her good mother would grieve, if she did not go home. At length when it grew dark, she saw the light and came to the house in the forest. She begged quite prettily to be allowed to spend the night there, and the man with the white beard once more asked his animals,

"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And beautiful brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
"Duks," said they. Then the girl went to the stove where the animals were lying, and petted the cock and hen, and stroked their smooth feathers with her hand, and caressed the brindled cow between her horns, and when, in obedience to the old man's orders, she had made ready some good soup, and the bowl was placed upon the table, she said, "Am I to eat as much as I want, and the good animals to have nothing? Outside is food in plenty, I will look after them first." So she went and brought some barley and stewed it for the cock and hen, and a whole armful of sweet- smelling hay for the cow. "I hope you will like it, dear animals," said she, "and you shall have a refreshing draught in case you are thirsty." Then she fetched in a bucketful of water, and the cock and hen jumped on to the edge of it and dipped their beaks in, and then held up their heads as the birds do when they drink, and the brindled cow also took a hearty draught. When the animals were fed, the girl seated herself at the table by the old man, and ate what he had left. It was not long before the cock and the hen began to thrust their heads beneath their wings, and the eyes of the cow likewise began to blink. Then said the girl, "Ought we not to go to bed?"
"Pretty little hen,
Pretty little cock,
And pretty brindled cow,
What say ye to that?"
The animals answered "Duks,"
"Thou hast eaten with us,
Thou hast drunk with us,
Thou hast had kind thought for all of us,
We wish thee good-night."
Then the maiden went upstairs, shook the feather-beds, and laid clean sheets on them, and when she had done it the old man came and lay down on one of the beds, and his white beard reached down to his feet. The girl lay down on the other, said her prayers, and fell asleep.
She slept quietly till midnight, and then there was such a noise in the house that she awoke. There was a sound of cracking and splitting in every corner, and the doors sprang open, and beat against the walls. The beams groaned as if they were being torn out of their joints, it seemed as if the staircase were falling down, and at length there was a crash as if the entire roof had fallen in. As, however, all grew quiet once more, and the girl was not hurt, she stayed quietly lying where she was, and fell asleep again. But when she woke up in the morning with the brilliancy of the sunshine, what did her eyes behold? She was lying in a vast hall, and everything around her shone with royal splendor; on the walls, golden flowers grew up on a ground of green silk, the bed was of ivory, and the canopy of red velvet, and on a chair close by, was a pair of shoes embroidered with pearls. The girl believed that she was in a dream, but three richly clad attendants came in, and asked what orders she would like to give? "If you will go," she replied, "I will get up at once and make ready some soup for the old man, and then I will feed the pretty little hen, and the cock, and the beautiful brindled cow." She thought the old man was up already, and looked round at his bed; he, however, was not lying in it, but a stranger. And while she was looking at him, and becoming aware that he was young and handsome, he awoke, sat up in bed, and said, "I am a King's son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals - and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace." And when they had arisen, the King's son ordered the three attendants to set out and fetch the father and mother of the girl to the marriage feast. "But where are my two sisters?" inquired the maiden. "I have locked them in the cellar, and to-morrow they shall be led into the forest, and shall live as servants to a charcoal-burner, until they have grown kinder, and do not leave poor animals to suffer hunger."
Un pobre leñador vivía, con su mujer y tres hijas, en una cabaña situada al borde de un solitario bosque. Una mañana, al salir para su trabajo, dijo a su esposa:
- Haz que la chica mayor me lleve la comida al bosque, pues no tendría tiempo de acabar. Y para que no se pierda - añadió -, me llevaré una bolsa de mijo y lo esparciré en el camino.
Cuando el sol estuvo muy alto, la muchacha se fue en busca de su padre con un puchero de sopas. Pero los gorriones, alondras, pinzones, mirlos y verderones se habían comido el grano hacía ya muchas horas, y la joven no encontró el camino. Estuvo andando a la ventura, hasta que se puso el sol y llegó la noche. En la oscuridad, los árboles rumoreaban, y silbaban los mochuelos, por lo cual la chica empezó a sentir miedo.
Al fin, descubrió a lo lejos una luz que brillaba entre los árboles: "Seguramente vivirá alguien allí - pensó -; me dejarán pasar la noche con ellos" y se encaminó hacia la luz. No tardó en llegar a una casa cuyas ventanas aparecían iluminadas. Llamó, y una voz ruda dijo desde dentro:
- ¡Adelante!
Entró la muchacha en el oscuro vestíbulo, y dio unos golpecitos a la puerta.
- ¡Adelante! - repitió la voz; y al abrir ella encontróse ante un hombre viejo y canoso sentado a una mesa; tenía el rostro apoyado en ambas manos, y la blanca barba le llegaba casi al suelo. Junto al hogar había tres animales: un pollito, un gallito y una vaca manchada. La muchacha explicó al viejo su percance y le pidió que le permitiese pasar la noche en la casa. Dijo entonces el hombre:

"Polluelo bonito,
mi caro gallito,
y tú, buena vaca manchada,
¿qué decís a la niña extraviada?."

- ¡Duks! - respondieron los animales, lo cual, sin duda, querría decir: "¡Nos place!," pues el viejo prosiguió -: Aquí hay de todo en abundancia; ve al hogar y prepara la cena.
La muchacha encontró de todo en la cocina y guisó una cena apetitosa, pero sin pensar en los animales. Trajo la fuente a la mesa y, sentándose con el anciano, comió hasta quedar satisfecha. Cuando hubo terminado, dijo:
- Ahora estoy cansada. ¿Dónde hay una cama en que pueda acostarme y dormir?
Los animales respondieron:

"Con él has comido,
con él has bebido;
de nosotros, nada quisiste saber.
Donde pasas la noche, presto vas a ver."

Y dijo el viejo:
- Sube por esta escalera y encontrarás una habitación con dos camas; sacúdelas y ponles ropa limpia; yo iré pronto a dormir.
Subió la muchacha, y cuando tuvo hechas las camas acostóse en una de ellas, sin aguardar al viejo. Al cabo de un rato entró éste y, contemplando a la muchacha a la luz de la lámpara, meneó la cabeza. Al ver que estaba profundamente dormida, abrió un escotillón y la dejó caer a la bodega.
El leñador regresó a su casa al anochecer y riñó a su esposa por haberle hecho pasar hambre todo el día.
- No tengo yo la culpa - justificóse la mujer -, pues mandé a la chica con la comida; debe de haberse extraviado y no volverá hasta mañana.
Al alba se levantó el leñador para marcharse de nuevo, y encargó que su hija segunda le llevase la comida.
- Tomaré una bolsa con lentejas - dijo -; los granos son mayores que los de mijo; la chica los verá mejor y no errará el camino.
A mediodía salió la hija segunda con el puchero. Pero las lentejas ya no estaban; como la víspera, los pájaros del bosque se las habían comido, sin dejar ni una. La muchacha anduvo vagando por la selva hasta la noche. Llegó, a su vez, a la casa del viejo e, invitada a entrar, pidió cena y refugio. El hombre de la barba blanca volvió a preguntar a los animales:

"Polluelo bonito,
mi caro gallito,
y tú, buena vaca manchada,
¿qué decís a la niña extraviada?."

Los animales respondieron también: - ¡Duks! -, y se repitió la escena de la noche anterior. La chica preparó una buena cena, comió y bebió con el abuelo; mas ni por un momento se le ocurrió pensar en los animales. Y cuando preguntó por la cama, contestaron éstos:

"Con él has comido,
con él has bebido;
de nosotros, nada quisiste saber.
Donde pasas la noche, presto vas a ver."

Una vez estuvo dormida entró el viejo, miróla, moviendo la cabeza, y la precipitó a la bodega.
Al tercer día dijo el leñador a su esposa:
- Envíame hoy a la pequeña con la comida; siempre se ha mostrado buena y obediente, y no se apartará del camino como sus hermanas, esos abejorros que sólo van a lo suyo.
La madre se resistía:
- ¿He de perder también a mi hija predilecta? - dijo.
- No temas nada - replicóle él -. La niña no se extraviará, pues es lista y juiciosa; además, yo esparciré guisantes que son mayores que las lentejas y le mostrarán el camino.
Pero cuando la muchachita llegó al bosque con su cesta, las palomas torcaces tenían los guisantes en el buche, por lo que ella no supo adónde dirigirse. Preocupada en extremo, pensaba constantemente en que su pobre padre sufría hambre y que su madre estaría inquieta si ella no regresaba pronto. Al fin, cuando ya oscureció, viendo la lucecita encaminóse a la casa del bosque. Muy modosita, pidió que la albergasen por aquella noche, y el hombre de la blanca barba volvió a preguntar a los animales:

"Polluelo bonito,
mi caro gallito,
y tú, buena vaca manchada,
¿qué decís a la niña extraviada?."

- ¡Duks! - contestaron. Acercóse entonces la muchachita al hogar donde yacían los animales, y acarició al pollito y al gallito, alisándoles las plumas, y a la vaca, rascándole entre los cuernos. Y cuando, siguiendo las indicaciones del abuelo, hubo preparado una buena sopa y traído la fuente a la mesa, dijo:
- ¿Voy a comer yo, dejando que no tengan nada estos pobres animales? Ahí fuera hay de todo en gran abundancia; empezaré por ellos.
Salió a buscar cebada y la echó a los pollos, y para la vaca trajo un buen montón de heno oloroso.
- Vaya, comed y hartaos, buenos animales - díjoles -: y si tenéis sed, os daré también un buen trago -. Y les trajo un cubo de agua. El polluelo y el gallito se subieron al borde y, metiendo el pico en el líquido, levantaron luego la cabeza, bebiendo como lo hacen las aves; la vaca, por su parte, vació medio cubo.
Una vez los animales estuvieron servidos, la niña se sentó a la mesa en compañía del viejo y cenó con lo que él había dejado. Al cabo de un rato, el polluelo y el gallito empezaron a meter la cabeza bajo las plumas, y la vaca, a parpadear. Dijo entonces la muchachita:
- ¿No sería hora de irnos a dormir?
Los animales contestaron: "¡Duks!"

"Con nosotros comiste,
con nosotros bebiste,
de nosotros te acordaste, cariñosa.
Ve a dormir, y en buena paz reposa."

Subió la niña las escaleras, sacudió las almohadas de pluma y puso ropa limpia en las camas. Luego fue el viejo a acostarse, y la blanca barba le llegaba a los pies. La muchachita se metió en la otra cama, rezó sus oraciones y se quedó dormida.
Durmió tranquilamente hasta media noche, hora en que se produjo en la casa un extraño rumor que la despertó. Oíanse en las esquinas raros crujidos y chirridos, y la puerta se abrió bruscamente, dando contra la pared; crepitaban las vigas, como si las arrancasen de quicio; pareció como si se derrumbase la escalera, y, finalmente, se oyó un estruendo, como si el tejado se viniese abajo. Como luego volvió a aquietarse todo sin que la chiquilla sufriese daño alguno, tranquilizóse y volvió a dormirse. Pero cuando se despertó a la mañana siguiente, ya bajo un sol espléndido, ¿qué diréis que vieron sus ojos? Hallábase en un espacioso salón, y en derredor todo brillaba con extraordinaria magnificencia; de las paredes salían, hacia lo alto, doradas flores sobre un fondo de seda verde; la cama era de marfil, y el dosel, de terciopelo rojo; y en una silla colocada al lado había unas chinelas bordadas con perlas. La muchachita creía estar soñando, pero en esto entraron tres criados, en ricas libreas, y le pidieron sus órdenes.
- Podéis iros - respondióles ella -; yo me levantaré enseguida a preparar una sopa para el viejo y dar de comer al polluelo, al gallito y a la buena vaca manchada.
Pensaba que el viejo se había levantado ya; mas al dirigir los ojos a su cama la vio ocupada por un desconocido. Fijóse mejor y se dio cuenta de que era un hombre joven y hermoso, el cual se despertó y dijo:
- Soy un príncipe, a quien una malvada bruja encantó, condenándome a vivir en el bosque bajo la figura de un viejo de barba blanca, sin que nadie pudiese estar a mi lado, aparte mis tres criados, convertidos, a su vez, en un polluelo, un gallito y una vaca de piel manchada. Y el encantamiento no había de cesar hasta que llegase a nuestra casa una muchacha de corazón tan bondadoso, que se mostrase caritativa no sólo con los hombres, sino también con los animales. Y ésa fuiste tú, por lo que a media noche quedamos todos redimidos, y la casa del bosque se transformó de nuevo en mi antiguo palacio real.
Cuando se hubieron levantado, mandó el príncipe a sus tres criados que fuesen en busca de los padres de la muchacha y los acompañasen al castillo como invitados de boda.
- Pero, ¿dónde están mis dos hermanas? - preguntó la muchacha.
- Las encerré en la bodega, y mañana serán conducidas al bosque, donde servirán, en casa de un carbonero, hasta que se hayan enmendado y no hagan pasar hambre a los pobres animales.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.