ENGLISH

Maid Maleen

中文

少女玛琳


There was once a King who had a son who asked in marriage the daughter of a mighty King; she was called Maid Maleen, and was very beautiful. As her father wished to give her to another, the prince was rejected; but as they both loved each other with all their hearts, they would not give each other up, and Maid Maleen said to her father, "I can and will take no other for my husband." Then the King flew into a passion, and ordered a dark tower to be built, into which no ray of sunlight or moonlight should enter. When it was finished, he said, "Therein shalt thou be imprisoned for seven years, and then I will come and see if thy perverse spirit is broken." Meat and drink for the seven years were carried into the tower, and then she and her waiting-woman were led into it and walled up, and thus cut off from the sky and from the earth. There they sat in the darkness, and knew not when day or night began. The King's son often went round and round the tower, and called their names, but no sound from without pierced through the thick walls. What else could they do but lament and complain? Meanwhile the time passed, and by the diminution of the food and drink they knew that the seven years were coming to an end. They thought the moment of their deliverance was come; but no stroke of the hammer was heard, no stone fell out of the wall, and it seemed to Maid Maleen that her father had forgotten her. As they only had food for a short time longer, and saw a miserable death awaiting them, Maid Maleen said, "We must try our last chance, and see if we can break through the wall." She took the bread-knife, and picked and bored at the mortar of a stone, and when she was tired, the waiting-maid took her turn. With great labour they succeeded in getting out one stone, and then a second, and a third, and when three days were over the first ray of light fell on their darkness, and at last the opening was so large that they could look out. The sky was blue, and a fresh breeze played on their faces; but how melancholy everything looked all around! Her father's castle lay in ruins, the town and the villages were, so far as could be seen, destroyed by fire, the fields far and wide laid to waste, and no human being was visible. When the opening in the wall was large enough for them to slip through, the waiting-maid sprang down first, and then Maid Maleen followed. But where were they to go? The enemy had ravaged the whole kingdom, driven away the King, and slain all the inhabitants. They wandered forth to seek another country, but nowhere did they find a shelter, or a human being to give them a mouthful of bread, and their need was so great that they were forced to appease their hunger with nettles. When, after long journeying, they came into another country, they tried to get work everywhere; but wherever they knocked they were turned away, and no one would have pity on them. At last they arrived in a large city and went to the royal palace. There also they were ordered to go away, but at last the cook said that they might stay in the kitchen and be scullions.
The son of the King in whose kingdom they were, was, however, the very man who had been betrothed to Maid Maleen. His father had chosen another bride for him, whose face was as ugly as her heart was wicked. The wedding was fixed, and the maiden had already arrived; but because of her great ugliness, however, she shut herself in her room, and allowed no one to see her, and Maid Maleen had to take her her meals from the kitchen. When the day came for the bride and the bridegroom to go to church, she was ashamed of her ugliness, and afraid that if she showed herself in the streets, she would be mocked and laughed at by the people. Then said she to Maid Maleen, "A great piece of luck has befallen thee. I have sprained my foot, and cannot well walk through the streets; thou shalt put on my wedding-clothes and take my place; a greater honour than that thou canst not have!" Maid Maleen, however, refused it, and said, "I wish for no honour which is not suitable for me." It was in vain, too, that the bride offered her gold. At last she said angrily, "If thou dost not obey me, it shall cost thee thy life. I have but to speak the word, and thy head will lie at thy feet." Then she was forced to obey, and put on the bride's magnificent clothes and all her jewels. When she entered the royal hall, every one was amazed at her great beauty, and the King said to his son, "This is the bride whom I have chosen for thee, and whom thou must lead to church." The bridegroom was astonished, and thought, "She is like my Maid Maleen, and I should believe that it was she herself, but she has long been shut up in the tower, or dead." He took her by the hand and led her to church. On the way was a nettle-plant, and she said,

"Oh, nettle-plant,
Little nettle-plant,
What dost thou here alone?
I have known the time
When I ate thee unboiled,
When I ate thee unroasted."
"What art thou saying?" asked the King's son. "Nothing," she replied, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." He was surprised that she knew about her, but kept silence. When they came to the foot-plank into the churchyard, she said,
"Foot-bridge, do not break,
I am not the true bride."
"What art thou saying there?" asked the King's son. "Nothing," she replied, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." - "Dost thou know Maid Maleen?" - "No," she answered, "how should I know her; I have only heard of her." When they came to the church-door, she said once more,

"Church-door, break not,
I am not the true bride."
"What art thou saying there?" asked he. "Ah," she answered, "I was only thinking of Maid Maleen." Then he took out a precious chain, put it round her neck, and fastened the clasp. Thereupon they entered the church, and the priest joined their hands together before the altar, and married them. He led her home, but she did not speak a single word the whole way. When they got back to the royal palace, she hurried into the bride's chamber, put off the magnificent clothes and the jewels, dressed herself in her gray gown, and kept nothing but the jewel on her neck, which she had received from the bridegroom.
When the night came, and the bride was to be led into the prince's apartment, she let her veil fall over her face, that he might not observe the deception. As soon as every one had gone away, he said to her, "What didst thou say to the nettle-plant which was growing by the wayside?"

"To which nettle-plant?" asked she; "I don't talk to nettle-plants." - "If thou didst not do it, then thou art not the true bride," said he. So she bethought herself, and said,

"I must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me."
She went out and sought Maid Maleen. "Girl, what hast thou been saying to the nettle?" - "I said nothing but,

"Oh, nettle-plant,
Little nettle-plant,
What dost thou here alone?
I have known the time
When I ate thee unboiled,
When I ate thee unroasted."
The bride ran back into the chamber, and said, "I know now what I said to the nettle," and she repeated the words which she had just heard. "But what didst thou say to the foot-bridge when we went over it?" asked the King's son. "To the foot-bridge?" she answered. "I don't talk to foot-bridges." - "Then thou art not the true bride."
She again said,


"I must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me,"
And ran out and found Maid Maleen, "Girl, what didst thou say to the foot-bridge?"
"I said nothing but,


"Foot-bridge, do not break,
I am not the true bride."
"That costs thee thy life!" cried the bride, but she hurried into the room, and said, "I know now what I said to the foot-bridge," and she repeated the words. "But what didst thou say to the church-door?" - "To the church-door?" she replied; "I don't talk to church-doors." - "Then thou art not the true bride."
She went out and found Maid Maleen, and said, "Girl, what didst thou say to the church-door?"

"I said nothing but,

"Church-door, break not,
I am not the true bride."
"That will break thy neck for thee!" cried the bride, and flew into a terrible passion, but she hastened back into the room, and said, "I know now what I said to the church-door," and she repeated the words. "But where hast thou the jewel which I gave thee at the church-door?" - "What jewel?" she answered; "thou didst not give me any jewel." - "I myself put it round thy neck, and I myself fastened it; if thou dost not know that, thou art not the true bride." He drew the veil from her face, and when he saw her immeasurable ugliness, he sprang back terrified, and said, "How comest thou here? Who art thou?" - "I am thy betrothed bride, but because I feared lest the people should mock me when they saw me out of doors, I commanded the scullery-maid to dress herself in my clothes, and to go to church instead of me." - "Where is the girl?" said he; "I want to see her, go and bring her here." She went out and told the servants that the scullery-maid was an impostor, and that they must take her out into the court-yard and strike off her head. The servants laid hold of Maid Maleen and wanted to drag her out, but she screamed so loudly for help, that the King's son heard her voice, hurried out of his chamber and ordered them to set the maiden free instantly. Lights were brought, and then he saw on her neck the gold chain which he had given her at the church-door. "Thou art the true bride, said he, "who went with me to the church; come with me now to my room." When they were both alone, he said, "On the way to church thou didst name Maid Maleen, who was my betrothed bride; if I could believe it possible, I should think she was standing before me thou art like her in every respect." She answered, "I am Maid Maleen, who for thy sake was imprisoned seven years in the darkness, who suffered hunger and thirst, and has lived so long in want and poverty. To-day, however, the sun is shining on me once more. I was married to thee in the church, and I am thy lawful wife." Then they kissed each other, and were happy all the days of their lives. The false bride was rewarded for what she had done by having her head cut off.
The tower in which Maid Maleen had been imprisoned remained standing for a long time, and when the children passed by it they sang,

"Kling, klang, gloria.
Who sits within this tower?
A King's daughter, she sits within,
A sight of her I cannot win,
The wall it will not break,
The stone cannot be pierced.
Little Hans, with your coat so gay,
Follow me, follow me, fast as you may."
从前有个国王,他有一个儿子想向另一个强国的公主求婚。 公主的名字叫玛琳,生得国色天姿,相貌迷人,因为公主的父亲准备把她嫁给别人,所以没有答应王子的求婚。 可他和公主早就心心相印,彼此不愿分离。 玛琳姑娘也对父亲说:"今生今世我非他不嫁。"国王一听勃然大怒,下令建造一座高塔,里面一片漆黑,不透丁点光线。 塔建好后,他对女儿说:"你得呆在塔里,七年后我再来,看你固执的念头打消了没有。"七年的饭食和水被带进了塔中,公主和她的侍女也被带进了塔里,墙被封死,从此与外面的世界隔绝。 她面对漆黑的塔壁静静地坐着,不知白天黑夜。 那位王子经常绕着塔外转来转去,呼唤着公主的名字,可厚厚的墙内哪能听到半点声音? 除了悲伤和抱怨,他们还能做什么呢?
时光在流逝,食物和水一天天地在减少,公主和侍女知道七年的期限就要到了,她们以为自己的出头之日就要到了,可是却听不到锤子的敲击声,也没有墙上石头落地的声音,看来她的父亲已把她忘了。 剩下的食物只能维持最后几天了,眼看着她们只能等死,玛琳姑娘说:"我们必须最后试一次,看看能否把墙弄穿。"她拿出了切面包的刀子,在石头缝的泥灰中使劲地挖呀钻呀,累了就让侍女接着干。 费了好大的劲,她们才拿出了一块石头,接着是第二块,第三块。 三天后,第一缕阳光射了进来,照在她们所在的黑暗处;最后口子大了,她们可以看到外面的世界了:天空湛蓝湛蓝的,微风轻抚着她们的面庞,可是周围的一切是多么凄凉啊! 她父亲的宫殿早已成为一片废墟,目所能及的城市和村落都已成了焦土,还有大量的土地早已荒废,远近更是看不到人烟。 缺口又弄大了,侍女先跳了下去,玛琳公主跟在后面,可是现在她们该往哪里去呢? 整个王国已被敌人洗劫一空,他们驱逐了国王,屠杀了他的所有臣民。 公主和侍女只得继续往前走,去寻找另一个国家。 但无论到哪里都找不到歇脚点,一路上没有人肯给她们施舍半点饭,她们只有靠荨麻来充饥。 经过长途跋涉,她们终于来到了另一个国家,她们开始到处找活干,可敲了许多家的门,都被拒绝了,没有人同情她们。 最后她们来到了一座大城市,她们直奔皇宫,可那里的人也叫她们走开,最后厨师收留了她们,让她们帮着打扫。
现在这个国家的王子正巧是想向玛琳姑娘求婚的人。 王子的父亲给他挑选了另一位新娘,这位新娘不仅奇丑无比,而且心狠手辣。 婚期一定,新娘也已到了,可由于她生得实在太丑,她便把自己关在屋里不愿见人。 少女玛琳从厨房给她端来饭菜。 新郎新娘上教堂的时候终于到了,新娘也因为自己丑陋而懊悔不已,怕自己在街上一露面,会遭来众人的戏谑和嘲笑,于是她对少女玛琳说:"你真是有天大的福份!我的脚扭了,不能在街上走,你就穿上我的婚纱替我一回吧!这对你来说该是莫大的荣誉和无上的光荣。"可是玛琳姑娘却不同意,并说:"我不希望得到任何不属于我的荣誉。"新娘又以金钱来引诱她,可这也是徒劳。 最后新娘火了,说:"如果你不听我的话,我就要你的命。只消我说一个字,管叫你人头落地。"少女玛琳只好服从了,于是她穿上新娘华丽的婚礼服,戴上了首饰。 当她踏进皇宫的大厅时,在场的所有人都为她的美丽所震惊了。 只听国王对王子说:"这就是我为你挑的新娘,你就引她去教堂吧。"新郎惊呆了,心想:"她这么像我的玛琳,这真叫我以为她就是玛琳;可是现在她还被囚在高高的塔里,或许已死了。"于是他拉着姑娘的手,引她去教堂。 她看见了一丛荨麻,就说道:
"噢,荨麻呀荨麻,
小小的荨麻,
你为何孤零零地长在这里?
我还记得那个时候我没有煮你,
就拿你来生吃。 "
"你在说什么?"王子问。 "没什么,"少女玛琳答道,"我只是想到了少女玛琳。"王子很是诧异她竟会认识少女玛琳,可他什么都没说。 当他们来到通往教堂的独木桥时,她又说:
"独木桥呀你莫断,
我可不是真新娘。 "
"你在说什么?"王子又问。 "没什么,"她回答说,"我只是想起了少女玛琳。""你认识少女玛琳?""噢,不,"她答道,"我怎么会认识她呢?我仅仅是听说过她。"当他们来到教堂的门口,她有一次说:
"教堂的门呀打不破,
我这新娘是冒牌货。 "
"你在说什么?"王子又问。 "噢,"她答道,"我只是想起了少女玛琳。"王子取出了一串珍贵的项链,戴在她的脖子上,替她扣好了链环,于是他们双双走进了教堂。 在圣台前,牧师把他们的手拉在一起,为他们主了婚。 然后王子领着新娘回去了,可一路上新娘却一言不发。 他们一到皇宫,玛琳就匆匆跑进丑新娘的房间,脱下身上华丽的衣服,卸下首饰,重新穿上了自己的灰罩衫,不过脖子上留下了新郎送给她的那串项链。
夜晚来临时,新郎领着新娘进了新房;可新娘的头上蒙着块纱巾,不让新郎发现这场骗局。 当众人散去后,新郎对新娘说:"你曾对路边长着的荨麻说过什么?"
"对荨麻?"新娘问道,"我没有对荨麻说过什么呀!""如果你没有对荨麻说过什么,那你一定是假新娘。"新郎说。 新娘想了想,说道:"我得去找我的侍女,她总替我记着这些事儿。"
于是她就出去找到了少女玛琳。 "小丫头,你曾对荨麻说过什么?""我只是说:
"噢,荨麻呀荨麻,
小小的荨麻,
你为何孤零零地长在这里?
我还记得那个时候我没有煮你,
就拿你来生吃。 "
听到这些话,新娘立刻跑回新房,对新郎说:"我知道我对荨麻说过什么了!"于是她就把刚听到的话重复了一遍。 "可是我们过桥时,你又对桥说了什么?"王子问道。 "对桥?"新娘吃惊地问,"我什么都没对桥说呀!""那么你就不是真正的新娘。"新娘赶紧又说:"我得去问问我的侍女,她替我记着这些事儿。"说完就跑出去责备少女玛琳:"臭丫头,你究竟对桥说了什么?""我只是说:
独木桥呀你莫断,
我可不是真新娘。 "
"我会要你的命!"新娘叫道,可她又急忙跑进房间说:"现在我知道我对脚下的桥说过什么了!"说完就重复了少女玛琳的话。 "那么你又对教堂的门说了什么?""对教堂的门?"新娘万分惊讶,"我没对教堂门说过什么呀!""那么你是假新娘。"
新娘不得不再一次出去训斥少女玛琳:"臭丫头,你对教堂的门说过了些什么?""我只是说:
教堂的门呀打不破,
我这新娘是冒牌货。 "
"那会要你的命!"丑新娘喊道,气得她不得了,可人早又飞快地跑回了新房对王子说:"我知道我对教堂的门说过什么了!"说完就把少女玛琳的话重复了一遍。 "可是我在教堂门口给你的项链哪去了?""什么项链?"新娘答道,"你并没有给我项链呀!""是我亲手给戴上的项链,而且还是我替你扣好的。如果你连这都不知道,那你就不是真新娘。"他一把揭开了她脸上的面纱,猛地看到了她那无比丑陋的脸,吓了一大跳,说:"你是谁?你怎么来这儿的?""我是你的新娘呀!因为我害怕大伙笑话我,就让那厨房中的丫头穿上我的衣服,替我去了教堂。""那丫头在哪里?"王子问道,"我想见她,快把她带来见我。"丑新娘赶紧出去告诉仆人,厨房那丫头是个骗子,要他们把她带到院子里杀掉。 仆人们拉着少女玛琳就往外拖,她大呼救命,王子听到了呼叫,匆忙跑出房间,他命令仆人立刻放了玛琳。 灯点上后,王子看到了他在教堂前给她的那串项链,"你才是真新娘,"王子说,"你和我一起进了教堂,现在和我回新房吧!"当只剩下他们俩的时候,王子说:"在去教堂的路上你提到了少女玛琳,她原是我的未婚妻;如果我的直觉没有错的话,站在我面前的应是她,你真是和她一模一样。"姑娘回答道:"我就是少女玛琳。为了你,我在黑暗中囚禁了七年;为了你,我忍饥又挨饿;为了你,我在期待与贫穷中挣扎了许久。现在阳光终于又重新照在了我的身上。我在教堂中与你结了婚;现在,我就是你的合法妻子。"于是他们互相亲吻着,从此生活幸福又美满。 那假新娘也为她所做所为付出了代价,最后被砍掉了头。
囚禁少女玛琳的那座塔还一直耸立着,许多年后,每当孩子们打那里经过时,总会唱:

"叮,叮,叮叮,
塔儿森森暗无光,
玛琳姑娘心儿伤,
她的脸儿瞧不见。
墙儿高高垮不掉,
石头坚坚推不倒。
小汉斯呀穿花褂,
在我的后面跟紧啦!




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