ENGLISH

The robber bridegroom

DEUTSCH

Der Räuberbräutigam


There was once a miller who had a beautiful daughter, and when she was grown up he became anxious that she should be well married and taken care of; so he thought, "If a decent sort of man comes and asks her in marriage, I will give her to him." Soon after a suitor came forward who seemed very well to do, and as the miller knew nothing to his disadvantage, he promised him his daughter. But the girl did not seem to love him as a bride should love her bridegroom; she had no confidence in him; as often as she saw him or thought about him, she felt a chill at her heart. One day he said to her, "You are to be my bride, and yet you have never been to see me." The girl answered, "I do not know where your house is." Then he said, "My house is a long way in the wood." She began to make excuses, and said she could not find the way to it; but the bridegroom said, "You must come and pay me a visit next Sunday; I have already invited company, and I will strew ashes on the path through the wood, so that you will be sure to find it."

When Sunday came, and the girl set out on her way, she felt very uneasy without knowing exactly why; and she filled both pockets full of peas and lentils. There were ashes strewed on the path through the wood, but, nevertheless, at each step she cast to the right and left a few peas on the ground. So she went on the whole day until she came to the middle of the wood, where it was the darkest, and there stood a lonely house, not pleasant in her eyes, for it was dismal and unhomelike. She walked in, but there was no one there, and the greatest stillness reigned. Suddenly she heard a voice cry,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

The girl glanced round, and perceived that the voice came from a bird who was hanging in a cage by the wall. And again it cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

Then the pretty bride went on from one room into another through the whole house, but it was quite empty, and no soul to be found in it. At last she reached the cellar, and there sat a very old woman nodding her head. "Can you tell me," said the bride, "if my bridegroom lives here?" - "Oh, poor child," answered the old woman, "do you know what has happened to you? You are in a place of cutthroats. You thought you were a bride, and soon to be married, but death will be your spouse. Look here, I have a great kettle of water to set on, and when once they have you in their power they will cut you in pieces without mercy, cook you, and eat you, for they are cannibals. Unless I have pity on you, and save you, all is over with you!"

Then the old woman hid her behind a great cask, where she could not be seen. "Be as still as a mouse," said she; "do not move or go away, or else you are lost. At night, when the robbers are asleep, we will escape. I have been waiting a long time for an opportunity." No sooner was it settled than the wicked gang entered the house. They brought another young woman with them, dragging her along, and they were drunk, and would not listen to her cries and groans. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one of white wine, one of red, and one of yellow, and then they cut her in pieces. The poor bride all the while shaking and trembling when she saw what a fate the robbers had intended for her. One of them noticed on the little finger of their victim a golden ring, and as he could not draw it off easily, he took an axe and chopped it off, but the finger jumped away, and fell behind the cask on the bride's lap. The robber took up a light to look for it, but he could not find it. Then said one of the others, "Have you looked behind the great cask?" But the old woman cried, "Come to supper, and leave off looking till to-morrow; the finger cannot run away."

Then the robbers said the old woman was right, and they left off searching, and sat down to eat, and the old woman dropped some sleeping stuff into their wine, so that before long they stretched themselves on the cellar floor, sleeping and snoring. When the bride heard that, she came from behind the cask, and had to make her way among the sleepers lying all about on the ground, and she felt very much afraid lest she might awaken any of them. But by good luck she passed through, and the old woman with her, and they opened the door, and they made all haste to leave that house of murderers. The wind had carried away the ashes from the path, but the peas and lentils had budded and sprung up, and the moonshine upon them showed the way. And they went on through the night, till in the morning they reached the mill. Then the girl related to her father all that had happened to her.

When the wedding-day came, the friends and neighbours assembled, the miller having invited them, and the bridegroom also appeared. When they were all seated at table, each one had to tell a story. But the bride sat still, and said nothing, till at last the bridegroom said to her, "Now, sweetheart, do you know no story? Tell us something." She answered, "I will tell you my dream. I was going alone through a wood, and I came at last to a house in which there was no living soul, but by the wall was a bird in a cage, who cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For evil things do here betide."

And then again it said it. Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. Then I went through all the rooms, and they were all empty, and it was so lonely and wretched. At last I went down into the cellar, and there sat an old old woman, nodding her head. I asked her if my bridegroom lived in that house, and she answered, ' Ah, poor child, you have come into a place of cut-throats; your bridegroom does live here, but he will kill you and cut you in pieces, and then cook and eat you.' Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. But the old woman hid me behind a great cask, and no sooner had she done so than the robbers came home, dragging with them a young woman, and they gave her to drink wine thrice, white, red, and yellow. Sweetheart, the dream is not yet ended. And then they killed her, and cut her in pieces. Sweetheart, my dream is not yet ended. And one of the robbers saw a gold ring on the finger of the young woman, and as it was difficult to get off, he took an axe and chopped off the finger, which jumped upwards, and then fell behind the great cask on my lap. And here is the finger with the ring!" At these words she drew it forth, and showed it to the company.

The robber, who during the story had grown deadly white, sprang up, and would have escaped, but the folks held him fast, and delivered him up to justice. And he and his whole gang were, for their evil deeds, condemned and executed.
Es war einmal ein Müller, der hatte eine schöne Tochter, und als sie herangewachsen war, so wünschte er, sie wäre versorgt und gut verheiratet: er dachte "kommt ein ordentlicher Freier und hält um sie an, so will ich sie ihm geben." Nicht lange, so kam ein Freier, der schien sehr reich zu sein, und da der Müller nichts an ihm auszusetzen wußte, so versprach er ihm seine Tochter. Das Mädchen aber hatte ihn nicht so recht lieb, wie eine Braut ihren Bräutigam lieb haben soll, und hatte kein Vertrauen zu ihm: sooft sie ihn ansah oder an ihn dachte, fühlte sie ein Grauen in ihrem Herzen. Einmal sprach er zu ihr "du bist meine Braut und besuchst mich nicht einmal." Das Mädchen antwortete "ich weiß nicht, wo Euer Haus ist." Da sprach der Bräutigam "mein Haus ist draußen im dunkeln Wald." Es suchte Ausreden und meinte, es könnte den Weg dahin nicht finden.

Der Bräutigam sagte "künftigen Sonntag mußt du hinaus zu mir kommen, ich habe die Gäste schon eingeladen, und damit du den Weg durch den Wald findest, so will ich dir Asche streuen." Als der Sonntag kam und das Mädchen sich auf den Weg machen sollte, ward ihm so angst, es wußte selbst nicht recht, warum, und damit es den Weg bezeichnen könnte, steckte es sich beide Taschen voll Erbsen und Linsen. An dem Eingang des Waldes war Asche gestreut, der ging es nach, warf aber bei jedem Schritt rechts und links ein paar Erbsen auf die Erde. Es ging fast den ganzen Tag, bis es mitten in den Wald kam, wo er am dunkelsten war, da stand ein einsames Haus, das gefiel ihm nicht, denn es sah so finster und unheimlich aus. Es trat hinein, aber es war niemand darin und herrschte die größte Stille. Plötzlich rief eine Stimme

"kehr um, kehr um, du junge Braut,
du bist in einem Mörderhaus."

Das Mädchen blickte auf und sah, daß die Stimme von einem Vogel kam, der da in einem Bauer an der Wand hing. Nochmals rief er

"kehr um, kehr um, du junge Braut,
du bist in einem Mörderhaus."

Da ging die schöne Braut weiter aus einer Stube in die andere und ging durch das ganze Haus, aber es war alles leer und keine Menschenseele zu finden. Endlich kam sie auch in den Keller, da saß eine steinalte Frau, die wackelte mit dem Kopfe. "Könnt Ihr mir nicht sagen," sprach das Mädchen, "ob mein Bräutigam hier wohnt?" - "Ach, du armes Kind," antwortete die Alte, "wo bist du hingeraten! du bist in einer Mördergrube. Du meinst, du wärst eine Braut, die bald Hochzeit macht, aber du wirst die Hochzeit mit dem Tode halten. Siehst du, da hab ich einen großen Kessel mit Wasser aufsetzen müssen, wenn sie dich in ihrer Gewalt haben, so zerhacken sie dich ohne Barmherzigkeit, kochen dich und essen dich, denn es sind Menschenfresser. Wenn ich nicht Mitleid mit dir habe und dich rette, so bist du verloren."

Darauf führte es die Alte hinter ein großes Faß, wo man es nicht sehen konnte. "Sei wie ein Mäuschen still," sagte sie, "rege dich nicht und bewege dich nicht, sonst ists um dich geschehen. Nachts, wenn die Räuber schlafen, wollen wir entfliehen, ich habe schon lange auf eine Gelegenheit gewartet." Kaum war das geschehen, so kam die gottlose Rotte nach Haus. Sie brachten eine andere Jungfrau mitgeschleppt, waren trunken und hörten nicht auf ihr Schreien und Jammern. Sie gaben ihr Wein zu trinken, drei Gläser voll, ein Glas weißen, ein Glas roten und ein Glas gelben, davon zersprang ihr das Herz. Darauf rissen sie ihr die feinen Kleider ab, legten sie auf einen Tisch, zerhackten ihren schönen Leib in Stücke und streuten Salz darüber. Die arme Braut hinter dem Faß zitterte und bebte, denn sie sah wohl, was für ein Schicksal ihr die Räuber zugedacht hatten. Einer von ihnen bemerkte an dem kleinen Finger der Gemordeten einen goldenen Ring, und als er sich nicht gleich abziehen ließ, so nahm er ein Beil und hackte den Finger ab: aber der Finger sprang in die Höhe über das Faß hinweg und fiel der Braut gerade in den Schoß. Der Räuber nahm ein Licht und wollte ihn suchen, konnte ihn aber nicht finden. Da sprach ein anderer "hast du auch schon hinter dem großen Fasse gesucht?" Aber die Alte rief "kommt und eßt, und laßt das Suchen bis morgen: der Finger läuft euch nicht fort."

Da sprachen die Räuber "die Alte hat recht," ließen vom Suchen ab, setzten sich zum Essen, und die Alte tröpfelte ihnen einen Schlaftrunk in den Wein, daß sie sich bald in den Keller hinlegten, schliefen und schnarchten. Als die Braut das hörte, kam sie hinter dem Faß hervor, und mußte über die Schlafenden wegschreiten, die da reihenweise auf der Erde lagen, und hatte große Angst, sie möchte einen aufwecken. Aber Gott half ihr, daß sie glücklich durchkam, die Alte stieg mit ihr hinauf, öffnete die Türe, und sie eilten, so schnell sie konnten, aus der Mördergrube fort. Die gestreute Asche hatte der Wind weggeweht, aber die Erbsen und Linsen hatten gekeimt und waren aufgegangen, und zeigten im Mondschein den Weg. Sie gingen die ganze Nacht, bis sie morgens in der Mühle ankamen. Da erzählte das Mädchen seinem Vater alles, wie es sich zugetragen hatte.

Als der Tag kam, wo die Hochzeit sollte gehalten werden, erschien der Bräutigam, der Müller aber hatte alle seine Verwandte und Bekannte einladen lassen. Wie sie bei Tische saßen, ward einem jeden aufgegeben, etwas zu erzählen. Die Braut saß still und redete nichts. Da sprach der Bräutigam zur Braut "nun, mein Herz, weißt du nichts? erzähl uns auch etwas." Sie antwortete "so will ich einen Traum erzählen. Ich ging allein durch einen Wald und kam endlich zu einem Haus, da war keine Menschenseele darin, aber an der Wand war ein Vogel in einem Bauer, der rief

"kehr um, kehr um, du junge Braut,
du bist in einem Mörderhaus."

Und rief es noch einmal. Mein Schatz, das träumte mir nur. Da ging ich durch alle Stuben, und alle waren leer, und es war so unheimlich darin; ich stieg endlich hinab in den Keller, da saß eine steinalte Frau darin, die wackelte mit dem Kopfe. Ich fragte sie "wohnt mein Bräutigam in diesem Haus?" Sie antwortete "ach, du armes Kind, du bist in eine Mördergrube geraten, dein Bräutigam wohnt hier, aber er will dich zerhacken und töten, und will dich dann kochen und essen." Mein Schatz, das träumte mir nur. Aber die alte Frau versteckte mich hinter ein großes Faß, und kaum war ich da verborgen, so kamen die Räuber heim und schleppten eine Jungfrau mit sich, der gaben sie dreierlei Wein zu trinken, weißen, roten und gelben, davon zersprang ihr das Herz. Mein Schatz, das träumte mir nur. Darauf zogen sie ihr die feinen Kleider ab, zerhackten ihren schönen Leib auf einem Tisch in Stücke und bestreuten ihn mit Salz. Mein Schatz, das träumte mir nur. Und einer von den Räubern sah, daß an dem Goldfinger noch ein Ring steckte, und weil er schwer abzuziehen war, so nahm er ein Beil und hieb ihn ab, aber der Finger sprang in die Höhe und sprang hinter das große Faß und fiel mir in den Schoß. Und da ist der Finger mit dem Ring." Bei diesen Worten zog sie ihn hervor und zeigte ihn den Anwesenden.

Der Räuber, der bei der Erzählung ganz kreideweiß geworden war, sprang auf und wollte entfliehen, aber die Gäste hielten ihn fest und überlieferten ihn den Gerichten. Da ward er und seine ganze Bande für ihre Schandtaten gerichtet.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.