ENGLISH

The robber bridegroom

ITALIANO

Il fidanzato brigante


There was once a miller who had a beautiful daughter, and when she was grown up he became anxious that she should be well married and taken care of; so he thought, "If a decent sort of man comes and asks her in marriage, I will give her to him." Soon after a suitor came forward who seemed very well to do, and as the miller knew nothing to his disadvantage, he promised him his daughter. But the girl did not seem to love him as a bride should love her bridegroom; she had no confidence in him; as often as she saw him or thought about him, she felt a chill at her heart. One day he said to her, "You are to be my bride, and yet you have never been to see me." The girl answered, "I do not know where your house is." Then he said, "My house is a long way in the wood." She began to make excuses, and said she could not find the way to it; but the bridegroom said, "You must come and pay me a visit next Sunday; I have already invited company, and I will strew ashes on the path through the wood, so that you will be sure to find it."

When Sunday came, and the girl set out on her way, she felt very uneasy without knowing exactly why; and she filled both pockets full of peas and lentils. There were ashes strewed on the path through the wood, but, nevertheless, at each step she cast to the right and left a few peas on the ground. So she went on the whole day until she came to the middle of the wood, where it was the darkest, and there stood a lonely house, not pleasant in her eyes, for it was dismal and unhomelike. She walked in, but there was no one there, and the greatest stillness reigned. Suddenly she heard a voice cry,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

The girl glanced round, and perceived that the voice came from a bird who was hanging in a cage by the wall. And again it cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For here do evil things betide."

Then the pretty bride went on from one room into another through the whole house, but it was quite empty, and no soul to be found in it. At last she reached the cellar, and there sat a very old woman nodding her head. "Can you tell me," said the bride, "if my bridegroom lives here?" - "Oh, poor child," answered the old woman, "do you know what has happened to you? You are in a place of cutthroats. You thought you were a bride, and soon to be married, but death will be your spouse. Look here, I have a great kettle of water to set on, and when once they have you in their power they will cut you in pieces without mercy, cook you, and eat you, for they are cannibals. Unless I have pity on you, and save you, all is over with you!"

Then the old woman hid her behind a great cask, where she could not be seen. "Be as still as a mouse," said she; "do not move or go away, or else you are lost. At night, when the robbers are asleep, we will escape. I have been waiting a long time for an opportunity." No sooner was it settled than the wicked gang entered the house. They brought another young woman with them, dragging her along, and they were drunk, and would not listen to her cries and groans. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one of white wine, one of red, and one of yellow, and then they cut her in pieces. The poor bride all the while shaking and trembling when she saw what a fate the robbers had intended for her. One of them noticed on the little finger of their victim a golden ring, and as he could not draw it off easily, he took an axe and chopped it off, but the finger jumped away, and fell behind the cask on the bride's lap. The robber took up a light to look for it, but he could not find it. Then said one of the others, "Have you looked behind the great cask?" But the old woman cried, "Come to supper, and leave off looking till to-morrow; the finger cannot run away."

Then the robbers said the old woman was right, and they left off searching, and sat down to eat, and the old woman dropped some sleeping stuff into their wine, so that before long they stretched themselves on the cellar floor, sleeping and snoring. When the bride heard that, she came from behind the cask, and had to make her way among the sleepers lying all about on the ground, and she felt very much afraid lest she might awaken any of them. But by good luck she passed through, and the old woman with her, and they opened the door, and they made all haste to leave that house of murderers. The wind had carried away the ashes from the path, but the peas and lentils had budded and sprung up, and the moonshine upon them showed the way. And they went on through the night, till in the morning they reached the mill. Then the girl related to her father all that had happened to her.

When the wedding-day came, the friends and neighbours assembled, the miller having invited them, and the bridegroom also appeared. When they were all seated at table, each one had to tell a story. But the bride sat still, and said nothing, till at last the bridegroom said to her, "Now, sweetheart, do you know no story? Tell us something." She answered, "I will tell you my dream. I was going alone through a wood, and I came at last to a house in which there was no living soul, but by the wall was a bird in a cage, who cried,

"Turn back, turn back, thou pretty bride,
Within this house thou must not bide,
For evil things do here betide."

And then again it said it. Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. Then I went through all the rooms, and they were all empty, and it was so lonely and wretched. At last I went down into the cellar, and there sat an old old woman, nodding her head. I asked her if my bridegroom lived in that house, and she answered, ' Ah, poor child, you have come into a place of cut-throats; your bridegroom does live here, but he will kill you and cut you in pieces, and then cook and eat you.' Sweetheart, the dream is not ended. But the old woman hid me behind a great cask, and no sooner had she done so than the robbers came home, dragging with them a young woman, and they gave her to drink wine thrice, white, red, and yellow. Sweetheart, the dream is not yet ended. And then they killed her, and cut her in pieces. Sweetheart, my dream is not yet ended. And one of the robbers saw a gold ring on the finger of the young woman, and as it was difficult to get off, he took an axe and chopped off the finger, which jumped upwards, and then fell behind the great cask on my lap. And here is the finger with the ring!" At these words she drew it forth, and showed it to the company.

The robber, who during the story had grown deadly white, sprang up, and would have escaped, but the folks held him fast, and delivered him up to justice. And he and his whole gang were, for their evil deeds, condemned and executed.
C'era una volta un mugnaio che aveva una bella figlia; e quando fu in età da marito pensò: "Se si presenta un pretendente come si deve e me la chiede in moglie, gliela darò, in modo da sistemarla." Ora avvenne che arrivò un pretendente che sembrava molto ricco; e il mugnaio, non trovando nulla da ridire, gli promise sua figlia. Ma la fanciulla non lo amava come si deve amare un fidanzato, e provava orrore in cuor suo ogni volta che lo guardava o che pensava a lui. Un giorno egli le disse: -Sei la mia fidanzata e non vieni mai a trovarmi-. La fanciulla rispose: -Non so dov'è la vostra casa-. -La mia casa è la fuori, nel folto del bosco- rispose il fidanzato. Allora ella cercò delle scuse e disse: -Non riuscirò a trovare la strada-. Ma egli replicò: -Devi venire da me domenica prossima, ho già fatto degli inviti e perché‚ tu possa trovare la strada la cospargerò di cenere-. La domenica, quando la fanciulla stava per mettersi in cammino, le venne una gran paura. Si riempi le tasche di ceci e lenticchie: all'ingresso del bosco era sparsa la cenere, ella la seguì ma a ogni passo gettava qualche cece in terra a destra e a sinistra. Camminò quasi tutto il giorno fino a quando giunse a una casa isolata nel più folto del bosco. Dentro non c'era nessuno; regnava il più profondo silenzio. D'un tratto una voce gridò:-Scappa, sposina, qui abitano tanti feroci e temibili briganti!-. La fanciulla alzò gli occhi e vide che a gridare era stato un uccello rinchiuso in una gabbia. Di nuovo quello gridò:-Scappa, sposina, qui abitano tanti feroci e temibili briganti!-La bella sposa andò da una stanza all'altra e girò per la casa, ma era tutta vuota e non trovò anima viva. Finalmente giunse in cantina; là sedeva una vecchia decrepita. -Potete dirmi se il mio fidanzato abita qui?- domandò la ragazza. -Ah, povera bimba- rispose la vecchia -sei finita in un covo di assassini; le tue nozze saranno anche la tua morte: il brigante ti ucciderà. Vedi, ho dovuto mettere sul fuoco un gran paiolo pieno d'acqua. Se cadi nelle loro mani, ti fanno a pezzi, poi ti fanno bollire e ti mangiano. Se non ti salvo sei perduta!- La vecchia la nascose così dietro una grossa botte e disse: -Sta' cheta e non muoverti o sei spacciata! Fuggiremo quando i briganti dormiranno: da un pezzo ne aspettavo l'occasione-. Aveva appena pronunciato queste parole che i malviventi giunsero a casa trascinando con s‚ un'altra fanciulla; erano ubriachi e non badavano al suo pianto e alle sue grida. Le fecero bere tre bicchieri di vino, uno bianco, uno rosso e uno giallo; e il cuore le si schiantò. Poi le strapparono di dosso le belle vesti, la misero su di una tavola, fecero a pezzi il bel corpo e lo cosparsero di sale. La povera sposa dietro la botte era terrorizzata, temendo di dover subire la stessa sorte. Uno dei malviventi notò che l'uccisa portava un anello d'oro al dito e, non riuscendo subito a sfilarlo, prese una scure e mozzò il dito. Ma questo schizzò in aria e cadde dietro alla botte, proprio in grembo alla sposa. Il brigante prese un lume e si mise a cercarlo, ma non lo pot‚ trovare. Allora un altro disse: -Hai cercato anche dietro la grossa botte?-. Ma la vecchia gridò: -Venite a mangiare, cercherete domani; il dito mica vi scappa!-. I briganti smisero di cercare e si apprestarono a mangiare e a bere; ma la vecchia aveva versato loro un sonnifero nel vino, cosicché‚ si coricarono bell'e in cantina, si addormentarono e si misero a russare. Udendoli, la sposa uscì da dietro la botte, ma dovette scavalcare tutti i dormienti che giacevano in fila per terra e aveva una gran paura di svegliarne qualcuno. Ma con l'aiuto di Dio riuscì a passare, salì con la vecchia, e insieme fuggirono dalla casa degli assassini. Il vento aveva soffiato via la cenere, ma ceci e lenticchie erano germogliati e al chiaro di luna indicavano loro la via. Camminarono tutta la notte e giunsero al mulino la mattina dopo. La fanciulla raccontò al padre tutto quel che era accaduto. Quando venne il giorno delle nozze, comparve lo sposo; e il mugnaio aveva invitato tutti i suoi parenti e amici. A tavola ognuno dovette raccontare una storia. Allora lo sposo le disse: -Non hai niente da raccontare, cuor mio? Narra qualcosa anche tu-. Ella rispose: -Racconterò un sogno. Me ne andavo per un bosco e giunsi a una casa. Non c'era anima viva, ma soltanto un uccello, in una gabbia, che gridò per due volte:"Scappa, sposina, qui abitano tanti feroci e temibili briganti!"--Amor mio, non è che un sogno.- -Attraversai tutte le stanze ma erano vuote. Finalmente giunsi in cantina dove trovai una vecchia decrepita. "Abita qui il mio sposo?" le domandai. Ma lei rispose: "Ah, povera bimba, sei finita in un covo di assassini! Il fidanzato ti ucciderà, ti farà a pezzi e poi ti farà bollire per mangiarti!."- -Amor mio, non è che un sogno.- -Ma la vecchia mi nascose dietro una grossa botte, e non appena fui nascosta tornarono i briganti trascinando con s‚ una fanciulla. Le fecero bere tre qualità di vino: bianco, rosso e giallo; e il cuore le si schiantò.- -Amor mio, non è che un sogno.- -Poi le strapparono di dosso le belle vesti e, sulla tavola, fecero a pezzi il bel corpo e lo cosparsero di sale.- -Amor mio, non è che un sogno.- -Uno dei briganti vide che ella portava al dito un anello d'oro e, siccome non gli riusciva di sfilarlo, prese una scure e tagliò il dito. Ma questo schizzò in aria e cadde dietro la grossa botte, proprio nel mio grembo. Ed eccolo qui.- Così dicendo, lo tirò fuori e lo mostrò ai presenti. Il brigante, che all'udire il racconto era diventato bianco come gesso dallo spavento, vedendo il dito volle fuggire, ma gli ospiti lo fermarono e lo consegnarono al tribunale, dove fu giustiziato con tutta la banda per le sue infamie.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.