ENGLISH

Fitcher's Bird

ESPAÑOL

El pájaro del brujo


There was once a wizard who used to take the form of a poor man, and went to houses and begged, and caught pretty girls. No one knew whither he carried them, for they were never seen more. One day he appeared before the door of a man who had three pretty daughters; he looked like a poor weak beggar, and carried a basket on his back, as if he meant to collect charitable gifts in it. He begged for a little food, and when the eldest daughter came out and was just reaching him a piece of bread, he did but touch her, and she was forced to jump into his basket. Thereupon he hurried away with long strides, and carried her away into a dark forest to his house, which stood in the midst of it. Everything in the house was magnificent; he gave her whatsoever she could possibly desire, and said: "My darling, thou wilt certainly be happy with me, for thou hast everything thy heart can wish for." This lasted a few days, and then he said: "I must journey forth, and leave thee alone for a short time; there are the keys of the house; thou mayst go everywhere and look at everything except into one room, which this little key here opens, and there I forbid thee to go on pain of death." He likewise gave her an egg and said: "Preserve the egg carefully for me, and carry it continually about with thee, for a great misfortune would arise from the loss of it." She took the keys and the egg, and promised to obey him in everything. When he was gone, she went all round the house from the bottom to the top, and examined everything. The rooms shone with silver and gold, and she thought she had never seen such great splendour. At length she came to the forbidden door; she wished to pass it by, but curiosity let her have no rest. She examined the key, it looked just like any other; she put it in the keyhole and turned it a little, and the door sprang open. But what did she see when she went in? A great bloody basin stood in the middle of the room, and therein lay human beings, dead and hewn to pieces, and hard by was a block of wood, and a gleaming axe lay upon it. She was so terribly alarmed that the egg which she held in her hand fell into the basin. She got it out and washed the blood off, but in vain, it appeared again in a moment. She washed and scrubbed, but she could not get it out.

It was not long before the man came back from his journey, and the first things which he asked for were the key and the egg. She gave them to him, but she trembled as she did so, and he saw at once by the red spots that she had been in the bloody chamber. "Since thou hast gone into the room against my will," said he, "thou shalt go back into it against thine own. Thy life is ended." He threw her down, dragged her thither by her hair, cut her head off on the block, and hewed her in pieces so that her blood ran on the ground. Then he threw her into the basin with the rest.

"Now I will fetch myself the second," said the wizard, and again he went to the house in the shape of a poor man, and begged. Then the second daughter brought him a piece of bread; he caught her like the first, by simply touching her, and carried her away. She did not fare better than her sister. She allowed herself to be led away by her curiosity, opened the door of the bloody chamber, looked in, and had to atone for it with her life on the wizard's return. Then he went and brought the third sister, but she was clever and crafty. When he had given her the keys and the egg, and had left her, she first put the egg away with great care, and then she examined the house, and at last went into the forbidden room. Alas, what did she behold! Both her sisters lay there in the basin, cruelly murdered, and cut in pieces. But she began to gather their limbs together and put them in order, head, body, arms and legs. And when nothing further was wanting the limbs began to move and unite themselves together, and both the maidens opened their eyes and were once more alive. Then they rejoiced and kissed and caressed each other. On his arrival, the man at once demanded the keys and the egg, and as he could perceive no trace of any blood on it, he said: "Thou hast stood the test, thou shalt be my bride." He now had no longer any power over her, and was forced to do whatsoever she desired. "Oh, very well," said she, "thou shalt first take a basketful of gold to my father and mother, and carry it thyself on thy back; in the meantime I will prepare for the wedding." Then she ran to her sisters, whom she had hidden in a little chamber, and said: "The moment has come when I can save you. The wretch shall himself carry you home again, but as soon as you are at home send help to me." She put both of them in a basket and covered them quite over with gold, so that nothing of them was to be seen, then she called in the wizard and said to him: "Now carry the basket away, but I shall look through my little window and watch to see if thou stoppest on the way to stand or to rest."

The wizard raised the basket on his back and went away with it, but it weighed him down so heavily that the perspiration streamed from his face. Then he sat down and wanted to rest awhile, but immediately one of the girls in the basket cried: "I am looking through my little window, and I see that thou art resting. Wilt thou go on at once?" He thought it was his bride who was calling that to him; and got up on his legs again. Once more he was going to sit down, but instantly she cried: "I am looking through my little window, and I see that thou art resting. Wilt thou go on directly?" And whenever he stood still, she cried this, and then he was forced to go onwards, until at last, groaning and out of breath, he took the basket with the gold and the two maidens into their parents' house.

At home, however, the bride prepared the marriage-feast, and sent invitations to the friends of the wizard. Then she took a skull with grinning teeth, put some ornaments on it and a wreath of flowers, carried it upstairs to the garret-window, and let it look out from thence. When all was ready, she got into a barrel of honey, and then cut the feather-bed open and rolled herself in it, until she looked like a wondrous bird, and no one could recognize her. Then she went out of the house, and on her way she met some of the wedding-guests, who asked:

"O, Fitcher's bird, how com'st thou here?"
"I come from Fitcher's house quite near."
"And what may the young bride be doing?"
"From cellar to garret she's swept all clean,
And now from the window she's peeping, I ween."

At last she met the bridegroom, who was coming slowly back. He, like the others, asked:

"O, Fitcher's bird, how com'st thou here?"
"I come from Fitcher's house quite near."
"And what may the young bride be doing?
"From cellar to garret she's swept all clean,
And now from the window she's peeping, I ween."

The bridegroom looked up, saw the decked-out skull, thought it was his bride, and nodded to her, greeting her kindly. But when he and his guests had all gone into the house, the brothers and kinsmen of the bride, who had been sent to rescue her, arrived. They locked all the doors of the house, that no one might escape, set fire to it, and the wizard and all his crew had to burn.
Érase una vez un brujo que, adoptando la figura de anciano, iba a mendigar de puerta en puerta y robaba a las muchachas hermosas. Nadie sabía adónde las llevaba, pues desaparecían para siempre. Un día se presentó en la casa de un hombre rico, que tenía tres hijas muy bellas; iba, como de costumbre, en figura de achacoso mendigo, con una cesta a la espalda, como para meter en ella las limosnas que le hicieran. Pidió algo de comer, y al salir la mayor a darle un pedazo de pan, tocóla él con un dedo, y la muchacha se encontró en un instante dentro de la cesta.
Alejóse entonces el brujo a largos pasos, y se llevó a la chica a su casa, que estaba en medio de un tenebroso bosque. Todo era magnífico en la casa; el viejo dio a la joven cuanto ella pudiera apetecer y le dijo:
- Tesoro mío, aquí lo pasarás muy bien; tendrás todo lo que tu corazón pueda apetecer.
Así pasaron unos días, al cabo de los cuales dijo él:
- Debo marcharme y dejarte sola por breve tiempo. Ahí tienes las llaves de la casa: puedes recorrerla toda y ver cuanto hay en ella. Sólo no entrarás en la habitación correspondiente a esta llavecita. Te lo prohibo bajo pena de muerte. - Dióle también un huevo, diciéndole: - Guárdame este huevo cuidadosamente, y llévalo siempre contigo, pues si se perdiese ocurriría una gran desgracia.
Cogió la muchacha las llaves y el huevo, prometiendo cumplirlo todo al pie de la letra. Cuando se hubo marchado el brujo, visitó ella toda la casa, de arriba abajo, y vio que todos los aposentos relucían de oro y plata, como jamás soñara tal magnificencia. Llegó, por fin, ante la puerta prohibida, y su primera intención fue pasar de largo; pero la curiosidad no la dejaba en paz. Miró la llave y vio que era igual a las otras, la metió en la cerradura, y, casi sin hacer ninguna fuerza, la puerta se abrió. Pero, ¿qué es lo que vieron sus ojos? En el centro de la pieza había una gran pila ensangrentada, llena de miembros humanos, y, junto a ella, un tajo y un hacha reluciente. Fue tal su espanto, que se le cayó en la pila el huevo que sostenía en la mano, y, aunque se apresuró a recogerlo y secar la sangre, todo fue inútil; no hubo medio de borrar la mancha, por mucho que la lavó y frotó.
A poco regresaba de su viaje el hombre, y lo primero que hizo fue pedirle las llaves y el huevo. Dióselo todo ella, pero las manos le temblaban, y el brujo comprendió, por la mancha roja, que la muchacha había entrado en la cámara sangrienta:
- Puesto que has entrado en el aposento, contraviniendo mi voluntad - le dijo, - volverás a entrar ahora en contra de la tuya. Tu vida ha terminado.
La derribó al suelo, la arrastró por los cabellos, púsole la cabeza sobre el tajo y se la cortó de un hachazo, haciendo fluir su sangre por el suelo. Luego echó el cuerpo en la pila, con los demás.
- Iré ahora por la segunda - se dijo el brujo. Y, adoptando nuevamente la figura de un pordiosero, volvió a llamar a la puerta de aquel hombre para pedir limosna. Dióle la segunda hermana un pedazo de pan, y el hechicero se apoderó de ella con sólo tocarla, como hiciera con la otra, y se la llevó. La muchacha no tuvo mejor suerte que su hermana: cediendo a la curiosidad, abrió la cámara sangrienta y, al regreso de su raptor, hubo de pagar también con la cabeza. El brujo raptó luego la tercera, que era lista y astuta. Una vez hubo recibido las llaves y el huevo, lo primero que hizo en cuanto el hombre partió, fue poner el huevo a buen recaudo; luego registró toda la casa y, en último lugar, abrió el aposento vedado. ¡Dios del cielo, qué espectáculo! Sus dos hermanas queridas, lastimosamente despedazadas, yacían en la pila. La muchacha no perdió tiempo en lamentaciones, sino que se puso en seguida a recoger sus miembros y acoplarlos debidamente: cabeza, tronco, brazos y piernas. Y cuando ya no faltó nada, todos los miembros empezaron a moverse y soldarse, y las dos doncellas abrieron los ojos y recobraron la vida. Con gran alegría, se besaron y abrazaron cariñosamente.
El hombre, a su regreso, pidió en seguida las llaves y el huevo; y al no descubrir en éste ninguna huella de sangre, dijo:
- ¡Tú has pasado la prueba, tú serás mi novia!
Pero desde aquel momento había perdido todo poder sobre ella, y tenía que hacer a la fuerza lo que ella le exigía.
- Pues bien - le dijo la muchacha -, ante todo llevarás a mi padre y a mi madre un cesto lleno de oro, transportándolo sobre tu espalda; entretanto, yo prepararé la boda.
Y, corriendo a ver sus hermanas, que había ocultado en otro aposento, les dijo:
- Éste es el momento en que puedo salvaros; el malvado os llevará a casa él mismo; pero en cuanto estéis allí, enviadme socorro. - Metió a las dos en una gran cesta, las cubrió de oro y, llamando al brujo, le dijo: - Ahora llevarás este cesto a mi casa, y no se te ocurra detenerte en el camino a descansar, que yo te estaré mirando desde mi ventanita.
Cargóse el brujo la cesta a la espalda y emprendió su ruta; mas pesaba tanto, que pronto el sudor empezó a manarle por el rostro. Sentóse para descansar unos minutos; pero, inmediatamente, salió del cesto una voz:
- Estoy mirando por mi ventanita y veo que te paras. ¡Andando, enseguida!
Creyó él que era la voz de su novia y púsose a caminar de nuevo. Quiso repetir la parada al cabo de un rato; pero enseguida se dejó oír la misma voz:
- Estoy mirando por mi ventanita y veo que te paras. ¡Andando, enseguida!. - Y así cada vez que intentaba detenerse, hasta que, finalmente, llegó a la casa de las muchachas, gimiendo y jadeante, y dejó en ella el cesto que contenía las dos doncellas y el oro.
Mientras tanto, la novia disponía en casa la fiesta de la boda, a la que invitó a todos los amigos del brujo. Cogió luego una calavera que regañaba los dientes, púsole un adorno y una corona de flores y, llevándola arriba, la colocó en un tragaluz, como si mirase afuera. Cuando ya lo tuvo todo dispuesto, metióse ella en un barril de miel y luego se revolcó entre las plumas de un colchón, que partió en dos, con lo que las plumas se le pegaron en todo el cuerpo y tomó el aspecto de un ave rarísima; nadie habría sido capaz de reconocerla. Encaminóse entonces a su casa, y durante el camino se cruzó con algunos de los invitados a la boda, los cuales le preguntaron:
" - ¿De dónde vienes, pájaro embrujado?
- De la casa del brujo me han soltado.
- ¿Qué hace, pues, la joven prometida?
- La casa tiene ya toda barrida,
y ella, compuesta y aseada,
mirando está por el tragaluz de la entrada."
Finalmente, encontróse con el novio, que volvía caminando pesadamente y que, como los demás, le preguntó:
" - ¿De dónde vienes, pájaro embrujado?
- De la casa del brujo me han soltado.
- ¿Qué hace, pues, mi joven prometida?
- La casa tiene ya toda barrida,
y ella, compuesta y aseada,
mirando está por el tragaluz de la entrada."
Levantó el novio la vista y, viendo la compuesta calavera, creyó que era su prometida y le dirigió un amable saludo con un gesto de la cabeza. Pero en cuanto hubo entrado en la casa junto con sus invitados, presentáronse los hermanos y parientes de la novia, que habían acudido a socorrerla. Cerraron todas las puertas para que nadie pudiese escapar y prendieron fuego a la casa, haciendo morir abrasado al brujo y a toda aquella chusma.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.