ENGLISH

Old Hildebrand

ESPAÑOL

El viejo Hildebrando


Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her. The peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, "Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I'll tell you what; on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing so until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately."
"I will manage it," said the woman promptly. Now therefore on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did everything for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, "I feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end I should like to hear the parson's sermon that he is going to preach to-day." On that the peasant said, "Ah, my child, do not do it -- thou mightest make thyself worse if thou wert to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell thee everything the parson says."

"Well," said the woman, "go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that thou hearest." So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and would make a pilgimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly, and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, "Hurrah! dear wife, it is now almost the same thing as if thou wert well! The parson has preached to-day that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whoever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that thou mayst get well the faster," and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the woman got up, and the parson was there directly.

But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peasant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill, and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. "May you be blessed," said the gossip, "where are you off to so fast?"

"To all eternity, my friend," said the peasant, "my wife is ill, and I have been to-day to hear the parson's sermon, and he preached that if any one had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage." - "But listen, gossip," said the egg-merchant to the peasant, "are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don't you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way."

"My word!" said the peasant. "How I'd like to know if that's true!"

"Come, then," said the gossip, "I'll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself." So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket and carried him home.

When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merry there! The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes, and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and woman asked who was there. "It is I, gossip," said the egg-merchant, "give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already."

"Indeed, my friend," said the woman, "thou comest at a very inconvenient time for me, but as thou art here it can't be helped, come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove." Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parso, however, and the woman, were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, "Listen, my dear friend, thou canst sing beautifully; sing something to me." - "Oh," said the woman, "I cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that's all over now."

"Come," said the parson once more, "do sing some little song."

On that the woman began and sang,

"I've sent my husband away from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy."
Thereupon the parson sang,
"I wish 'twas a year before he came back,
I'd never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack."
Hallelujah.
Then the gossip who was in the background began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,
"What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear,
There on the bench by the stove so near?"

Hallelujah.
And then the peasant sang from his basket,
"All singing I ever shall hate from this day,
And here in this basket no longer I'll stay."
Hallelujah.
And he got out of the basket, and cudgelled the parson out of the house.
Había una vez un campesino y una campesina. Al cura delpueblo le gustaba mucho la campesina y siempre estabadeseando pasar, siquiera una vez, un día entero con ella asolas, divirtiéndose los dos, y a la campesina, bueno, tambiénle hubiese gustado. Así que un día le dijo a ella:
Bien, mi querida campesina, ya he planeado cómo podemos estar juntos todo el día pasándolo bien. Mira, el miércoles te metes en lacama y le dices a tu marido que estás enferma y te pones a lamentarte ya quejarte hasta el domingo, en que yo predicaré que si alguien tiene encasa un hijo enfermo, o un marido enfermo, o una mujer enferma, o unpadre enfermo, o una madre enferma, o una hermana enferma, o unhermano enfermo o quien sea, tiene que hacer una peregrinación a lamontaña de Glóckerli en Suiza, donde por un ducado * se puedecomprar un celemín de hojas de laurel y entonces se sanará en el actoel hijo enfermo, o el marido enfermo, o la mujer enferma, o el padre en-fermo, o la madre enferma, o la hermana enferma o cualquiera que estéenfermo.Así lo haré -dijo la campesina.Así que al miércoles siguiente, la campesina se metió en la cama ycomenzó a lamentarse y a quejarse, y su marido le trajo todo lo que sele ocurrió, pero nada la remedió.Cuando llegó el domingo, dijo la granjera:Me encuentro muy mal, pero antes de morirme, me gustaría oír elsermón que predique hoy el señor cura.Ay, hija mía, no hagas eso -dijo el granjero-; podrías ponerte peor site levantas. Mira, yo iré a oír el sermón, pondré mucha atención a lo quediga el señor cura y te lo contaré todo.Bueno-dijo la campesina-, pues ve y presta mucha atención ycuéntame todo lo que dice.
El campesino se fue a oír el sermón y el señor cura empezó a predicarque, si alguien tenía en su casa un hijo enfermo, o un marido enfermo, ouna mujer enferma, o un padre enfermo, o una madre enferma, o unahermana enferma, o un hermano enfermo, o quien fuera, y hacía unaperegrinación a la montaña de Glóckerli en Suiza, donde se podíacomprar por un ducado un celemín de hojas de laurel, sanaría en el actoel hijo enfermo, o el marido enfermo, o la mujer enferma, o el padreenfermo, o la madre enferma, o la hermana enferma, o el hermano ocualquiera que estuviese enfermo; y si alguien quería emprender elviaje, que fuera a verle después de la misa para que él le proporcionarael ducado y el saco para el laurel.Nadie se puso más contento que el campesino, que, nada más terminarla misa, fue a ver al párroco y éste le dio el ducado y el saco para ellaurel. Entonces se fue a su casa y ya desde el portal empezó a darvoces:¡Eureka! Mujer, estás prácticamente curada. El señor cura ha dicho ensu sermón que si alguien tenía en su casa un hijo enfermo, o un maridoenfermo, o una mujer enferma, o un padre enfermo, o una madreenferma, o una hermana enferma, o un hermano o quien fuera, y se ibaa hacer una peregrinación a la montaña de Glóckerli en Suiza, donde sepuede comprar por un ducado un celemín de hojas de laurel, se lecuraría en el acto el hijo enfermo, o el marido enfermo, o la mujer enferma, o el padre enfermo, o la madre enferma, o la hermanaenferma, o el hermano o cualquiera que estuviese enfermo. Yo ya hecogido el ducado y el saco de laurel que me ha dado el señor cura yempezaré en seguida la peregrinación para que te cures cuanto antes.Y se marchó en seguida.Apenas se había marchado, se levantó la mujer y apareció el cura.Pero vamos a dejar a esta pareja y sigamos con el campesino. Este ibapor el camino, anda que te andarás, para llegar cuanto antes a lamontaña de Glóckerli, y según iba así se encontró con su compadre. Sucompadre era vendedor de huevos y venía en ese momento delmercado, donde había vendido los huevos.Alabado seas -dijo su compadre-. ¿A dónde vas tan deprisa,compadre?Eternamente, compadre -dijo el granjero-. Mi mujer está enferma yhoy he oído decir al cura en el sermón que si alguien tiene en casa unhijo enfermo, o un marido enfermo, o una mujer enferma, o un padreenfermo, o una madre enferma, o una hermana enferma, o un hermanoo quien sea y hace una peregrinación a la montaña de Glóckerli, enSuiza, donde por un ducado se puede comprar un celemín de hojas delaurel, se le curaría en el acto el hijo enfermo, o el marido enfermo, o lamujer enferma, o el padre enfermo, o la madre enferma, o la hermanaenferma, o el hermano enfermo o cualquiera que estuviese enfermo; asíque le he cogido al señor cura el ducado y el saco para el laurel y me hepuesto en camino para hacer la peregrinación.Pero, por Dios, compadre -dijo el compadre al campesino-, ¿cómopuedes ser tan simple y creerte tal cosa? Lo que el cura quiere es estarun día con tu mujer y pasarlo bien, por eso te ha tomado el pelo, paraque le dejes vía libre.
Vaya -dijo el campesino-, me gustaría saber si lo que dices esverdad.Bueno -dijo el compadre-, vamos a hacer una cosa: métete en elcesto de los huevos, que yo te llevaré a casa y lo verás por ti mismo.Y así lo hicieron. El compadre metió al campesino en su cesto y le llevóa casa. Cuando llegaron a la casa estaba ésta en plena fiesta. Lacampesina había matado casi todo lo que había en la granja, habíahecho buñuelos y el cura estaba allí y había traído su violín.Entonces el compadre llamó a la puerta y la campesina preguntó quequién era.Soy yo, comadre -dijo el compadre-. Dame hospedaje por estanoche, que no he podido vender los huevos en el mercado y tengo quevolver a llevarlos a casa, pero pesan tanto, que no puedo con ellos y yaes de noche.Vaya, compadre -dijo la granjera-, no llegas en un momentooportuno, pero si no hay más remedio, pasa y siéntate en el banco de laestufa.Así que el compadre se sentó en el banco de la estufa con su cesto. El cura y la campesina lo estaban pasando alegremente. Al cabo de unrato dijo el cura:Anda, querida campesina, cántame algo, que cantas muy bien:Ay -dijo la campesina-, ya no canto tan bien. En mis añosmozos sí que lo hacía, pero ya no.Venga -dijo el cura-, anda, cántame un poquito. Entonces lacampesina empezó a cantar:He enviado a mi marido al monte Glóckerli en Suiza, y despuésde que él se ha ido sólo me muero de risa.Luego cantó el párroco:Ojalá que un año entero estuviera el hombre en él,porque a ver para qué quiero yo un celemín de laurel.¡Aleluya!Después empezó a cantar el compadre (y aquí tengo que decirque el campesino se llamaba Hildebrando). El compadre cantó:¡Ay, mi querido Hildebrando! O el calorcillo te atufa,o si los oyes cantando,¿qué haces aún en la estufa? ¡Aleluya!Entonces cantó el campesino dentro del cesto:¿Qué he tenido que escuchar? ¡Ya no puedo aguantar esto!Para ayudar a cantar,voy a salir de mi cesto.Y salió del cesto y, dándole una buena paliza al cura, lo echóde la casa.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.