ENGLISH

Old Hildebrand

ITALIANO

Il vecchio Ildebrando


Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her. The peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, "Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I'll tell you what; on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing so until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately."
"I will manage it," said the woman promptly. Now therefore on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did everything for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, "I feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end I should like to hear the parson's sermon that he is going to preach to-day." On that the peasant said, "Ah, my child, do not do it -- thou mightest make thyself worse if thou wert to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell thee everything the parson says."

"Well," said the woman, "go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that thou hearest." So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and would make a pilgimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly, and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, "Hurrah! dear wife, it is now almost the same thing as if thou wert well! The parson has preached to-day that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whoever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that thou mayst get well the faster," and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the woman got up, and the parson was there directly.

But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peasant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill, and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. "May you be blessed," said the gossip, "where are you off to so fast?"

"To all eternity, my friend," said the peasant, "my wife is ill, and I have been to-day to hear the parson's sermon, and he preached that if any one had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or any one else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately, and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage." - "But listen, gossip," said the egg-merchant to the peasant, "are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don't you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way."

"My word!" said the peasant. "How I'd like to know if that's true!"

"Come, then," said the gossip, "I'll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself." So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket and carried him home.

When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merry there! The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes, and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and woman asked who was there. "It is I, gossip," said the egg-merchant, "give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already."

"Indeed, my friend," said the woman, "thou comest at a very inconvenient time for me, but as thou art here it can't be helped, come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove." Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parso, however, and the woman, were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, "Listen, my dear friend, thou canst sing beautifully; sing something to me." - "Oh," said the woman, "I cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that's all over now."

"Come," said the parson once more, "do sing some little song."

On that the woman began and sang,

"I've sent my husband away from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy."
Thereupon the parson sang,
"I wish 'twas a year before he came back,
I'd never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack."
Hallelujah.
Then the gossip who was in the background began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,
"What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear,
There on the bench by the stove so near?"

Hallelujah.
And then the peasant sang from his basket,
"All singing I ever shall hate from this day,
And here in this basket no longer I'll stay."
Hallelujah.
And he got out of the basket, and cudgelled the parson out of the house.
C'era una volta un contadino e una contadina; per la contadina il parroco del villaggio aveva un debole e desiderava trascorrere tutta una giornata da solo con lei a spassarsela; e la cosa piaceva anche a lei. Allora un giorno egli le disse: -Mia cara, mi è venuta un'idea, per poter finalmente trascorrere insieme un'intera giornata e divertirci. Sapete? Mercoledì vi mettete a letto e dite a vostro marito che siete ammalata, e vi lamentate e gemete per bene e continuate così fino a domenica, quando io faccio la predica. E io dirò che se qualcuno ha in casa un bambino ammalato, un marito ammalato, una moglie ammalata, un padre ammalato, una madre ammalata, una sorella ammalata, un fratello o chicchessia, e si reca in pellegrinaggio al monte Gallegallicchio, in Italia, dove per un soldo si può comprare una gran quantità di foglie d'alloro, il figlio ammalato, il marito ammalato, la moglie ammalata, il padre ammalato, la madre ammalata, la sorella ammalata, il fratello o chicchessia guarisce all'istante-. -Lo farò- disse la contadina. Così il mercoledì si mise a letto, e si lamentava e gemeva da non dirsi; e suo marito le portava tutto quello che poteva venirgli in mente, ma non serviva a nulla. Quando venne domenica, la contadina disse: -Sto così male, come se dovessi morire, ma desidero ancora una cosa, prima della fine: vorrei sentire la predica che il parroco fa stamane-. -Ah, mia cara!- disse il contadino -non farlo! Potresti star peggio se ti alzi. Guarda, ci andrò io a sentire la predica, farò bene attenzione e ti riferirò tutto quello che dirà il parroco.- -Be'- disse la contadina -allora vai pure, ascolta bene e riferiscimi tutto quello che sentirai.- Così il contadino andò a sentire la predica, e il parroco incominciò a predicare e disse che se qualcuno aveva in casa un bambino ammalato, un marito ammalato, una moglie ammalata, un padre ammalato, una madre ammalata, una sorella ammalata, un fratello o chicchessia, se si recava in pellegrinaggio al monte Gallegallicchio, in Italia, dove una gran quantità di foglie d'alloro costa solo un soldo, il bambino ammalato, il marito ammalato, la moglie ammalata, il padre ammalato, la madre ammalata, la sorella ammalata, il fratello o chicchessia sarebbe guarito all'istante. E chi voleva compiere quel viaggio, doveva andare da lui dopo la messa, ch'egli gli avrebbe dato il sacco per l'alloro e il soldo. Nessuno era più felice del contadino che, dopo la messa, si recò subito dal parroco; e questi gli consegnò il sacco per l'alloro e il soldo. Poi andò a casa e, già sull'uscio, gridò: -Evviva, cara moglie! E' come se tu fossi già guarita. Oggi il parroco ci ha detto che se qualcuno ha in casa un bambino ammalato, un marito ammalato, una moglie ammalata, un padre ammalato, una madre ammalata, una sorella ammalata, un fratello o chicchessia, e si reca in pellegrinaggio al monte Gallegallicchio, in Italia, dove una gran quantità di foglie d'alloro costa un soldo, il bambino ammalato, il marito ammalato, la moglie ammalata, il padre ammalato, la madre ammalata, la sorella ammalata, il fratello o chicchessia guarisce all'istante. Mi sono già fatto dare dal parroco il sacco per l'alloro e il soldo, e mi metterò subito in cammino perché‚ tu possa guarire in fretta-. E se ne andò. E se n'era appena andato che la contadina era già in piedi, e il parroco in casa. Ma per ora lasciamoli stare e seguiamo il contadino. Egli camminava in fretta per arrivare il più in fretta possibile al monte Gallegallicchio, e mentre camminava incontrò il suo compare. Il suo compare vendeva le uova, e stava proprio tornando dal mercato, dove le aveva vendute. -Sia lodato!- disse. -Dove andate, così di fretta, compare?- -Sempre sia lodato!- disse il contadino. -Mia moglie si è ammalata, e oggi ho sentito la predica del parroco. Diceva che se qualcuno ha in casa un bambino ammalato, un marito ammalato, una moglie ammalata, un padre ammalato, una madre ammalata, una sorella ammalata, un fratello o chicchessia, e si reca in pellegrinaggio al monte Gallegallicchio, in Italia, dove una gran quantità di foglie d'alloro costa un soldo, il bambino ammalato, il marito ammalato, la moglie ammalata, il padre ammalato, la madre ammalata, la sorella ammalata, il fratello o chicchessia guarisce all'istante. Così mi sono fatto dare dal parroco il sacco per l'alloro e il soldo e mi sono messo in cammino.- -Ma via, compare!- disse l'altro al contadino. -Siete così sciocco da credere a una cosa simile? Sapete di che si tratta? Il parroco vuole passare un'intera giornata da solo con vostra moglie e spassarsela; perciò hanno inventato questa storia, per non avervi più fra i piedi.- -Oh, Signore!- esclamò il contadino. -Vorrei proprio saper se è vero!- -Be'- disse il compare -è presto fatto: mettetevi nella mia gerla, io vi porto a casa, e là vedrete voi stesso.- Così fecero, e il compare mise il contadino nella gerla e lo portò a casa. Quando arrivarono a casa, c'era una grande allegria: la contadina aveva sgozzato quasi tutti i polli del suo cortile, e aveva fatto le frittelle, e il parroco era già là e aveva portato il suo violino. Il compare bussò alla porta e la contadina domandò chi fosse. -Sono io, comare!- egli rispose. -Vi prego, datemi alloggio per questa notte: non ho venduto le mie uova al mercato, e ora devo riportarmele a casa, ma sono tanto pesanti che non ce la faccio più, ed è già buio.- -Eh, compare!- rispose la contadina. -Arrivate proprio al momento sbagliato! Ma dato che non si può far diversamente, entrate e sedetevi sulla panca della stufa.- Così il compare si sedette sulla panca della stufa con la sua gerla. Ma il parroco e la contadina erano proprio ben allegri. Alla fine il parroco disse: -Sentite, mia cara, voi che sapete cantare così bene, cantatemi qualcosa-. -Ah- disse la contadina -adesso non so più cantare; quand'ero giovane, allora sì, ma adesso è finita.- -Oh- tornò a dire il parroco -cantate solo un pochino!- Allora la contadina si mise a cantare:-A Gallegallicchio ti ho fatto andare, quanto sia lieta non puoi immaginare!-Poi cantò il parroco:-Magari ci stesse un anno, perbacco. Non gli domanderei nemmeno il sacco! Alleluja!-Ora incominciò a cantare il compare (ma prima devo dirvi che il contadino si chiamava Ildebrando); allora cantò il compare:-Ildebrando, sì caro al mio cuore, su questo banco cosa far vuole? Alleluja!-Infine cantò il contadino nella gerla:-Questa canzone non tollero più, e dalla gerla scenderò giù.-Uscì dalla gerla e scacciò di casa il parroco a bastonate.




Compare two languages:













Donations are welcomed & appreciated.


Thank you for your support.